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How "humane" are so-called humane animal movies? Something to roar about!

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posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 03:21 PM
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I recently watched the following interesting clip on YouTube: Four things you're not supposed to know. Most of the material was not entirely new or surprising - CIA stuff and what happens to genetic testing results (best to keep your blood to yourself). The fact that our food (even widely regarded vegetarian food) is full of aphids, caterpillars, maggots, sand, parasite cysts, rodent droppings and how legislation allows for this. A bit of an old hat to myself.

But what surprised me was movies that The American Humane Society (and similar organizations) called "humane" to animals that were anything but humane.
The tiger in The Life of Pi almost drowned, but because the observer from the Humane Society was bonking one of the producers, it kept its "humane" status.

Another smeared up animal catastrophe occurred during Peter Jackson's filming of The Hobbit, when 27 farm animals (mostly sheep and goats) died from dehydration when the crew took a break of several days, and simply abandoned the poor livestock! Wow, I'm sure Frodo would have looked perturbed about that cruelty.

During the filming of The Pirates of the Caribbean: The Black Pearl hundreds of fish and squid were blown up, and left to wash up and rot on surrounding shores. Never-mind the giraffe that was killed in Zookeeper, a husky being repeatedly punched in the diaphragm in Disney's Eight Below, and a chipmunk crushed to death in Failure to Launch. Humane - what a crock!

OK, animal cruelty is par for the course in factory farming, and millions support it (I mean common, surely everybody must have had a glimpse by now of what goes on in factory farms and slaughterhouses). I mean not to judge, I understand people have different views on animal rights. I'm just wondering why movies specifically should be "humane"?

Similarly, it is long known that animals were often abused in "wildlife documentaries", such as the lemmings that were thrown off cliffs to create the myth of the lemming suicides. en.wikipedia.org...

But why cover this up for movies, or at least why have we never widely heard about this, and non of the elitist (many with so-called "social conscious" images) actors and actresses are openly confronted about it?

Are there more shocking examples, and would you boycott a movie if you knew animals were indeed abused and killed?
Does a humane moniker make any difference as to the enjoyment of the movie, or is it as indifferent to most as having a cow at a burger joint?

The claims and shots of the sources are in this clip:


edit on 14-6-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Very cool thread. I'm listening to the video now.

The animals? What animals. Don't all those movies state no animals were hurt during the making of this film?

(/sarcasm)

peace



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Wow. Thanks for bringing this up...you know every so often I have scratched my head as the words: " no animals were harmed during the production of this film." Often times in regards horses during films like Gladiator etc...it always seemes impossible amongst all the fighting and running that not a single accident in a single film has caused harm to a single animal.
edit on 14-6-2017 by BlueJacket because: sp



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

a reply to: silo13


Not that I am saying it didn't happen. But this video is not a source. I would need an actual source.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

To answer some of your questions...I boycott buyin non USDA Organic wherever I can for just such reasons, along with some additional reasons too numerous to not clog up your thread.

I would certainly not purchase or go to a movie with knowledge of animal abuse.

I raise organic chickens and produce with my wife and daughter in order to avoid purchasing from as many conventional producers as possible because of these very themes. I hunt over populated deer for our table to minimize our consumption of conventionally raised animals and to cull the over populated throngs decimating the flora and getting and spreading diseases.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:30 PM
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First, I'll link an old thread of mine. You will see some of the animals behaviors...

Link to old thread

With that "said", I don't want to see animals abused, hurt or killed for any reasons, but life happens.

I guess I could say if I knew the animals used had the personality and willingness to do the stunts, then I'm good with it.
Anyone who has been close to animals knows they all have different personalities. Some are shy, others aggressive, others playful, etc.

Or, there is always CGI and animatronics that can be used. Surely, the time for animal robots to be used in movies is near when we see robotics current advancements.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

If it's an accident did they harm the animal or did it just happen?



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Well semantics dont really change the actual harm which otherwise wouldnt of occured does it?

I mean an accidental harm in the field, is different than one derived from the production of a film.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

No just whether they can legally make a claim.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:38 PM
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You should see all the animals PETA kills in the course of a year. It's way more than any omnivore would be responsible for. Quite shocking really but the world is full of hypocrites.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: MagnaCarta2015

Using logic I can demonstrate PETA believes in killing the homeless (people that is), even children.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Yeah good question



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: MagnaCarta2015

I think one can argue killing for culling an over population in a given area due to a lack of wild predation isnt the same thing. Not that Im a supporter of PETA by any means...but for what reason are they killing animals?



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

As far as I saw there were screen-shots to all sources in the clip, but for several of the cases in written reference see: www.telegraph.co.uk...

Of course people can add or even debunk individual arguments, articles or claims (since there could quite a lot).
However there was no way I could include that all as an OP simply starting a thread, and I did mention my source.
Many of these countdown clips have been taken down for plagiarism if they don't show their sources, and one can pause them.
This one does show sources for what I've mentioned, and as such is a viable, published source.
Yeah, maybe its credentials can be checked, like any published text, but accredited sources are given in the clip.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 05:09 PM
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There are many animal rights issues one could bring into this, but what makes me wonder is why markets specifically want movies or film to be "humane" (whatever that means anyway).

Aren't movies the ultimate illusion?

Why expect a spurious claim to be realistic?

Isn't it a bit like going to the circus (which have in recent years increasingly been targeted and boycotted for animal performances)?

And then the notion of "accidents".
Falling off your bicycle is an accident.
Putting an animal in harm's way for entertainment is no accident ever; it's a Roman circus.
The animal has no choice in being there.
It is only there because people put it there.

And people who are paying for this all probably don't even know or think about it.
That's no accident in any ethical sense.
It is exploitation.
edit on 14-6-2017 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 05:14 PM
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ALL animals in movies should be depicted using CGI or puppets!

One scene in The Abyss is particularly disturbing to me, yes, the rat survived, but it was clearly a traumatic experience for her. There were no special-effects in the following scene, what you see actually happened.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

I wanted to be clear I was not disputing it happened, I just won't go on the say so of Youtube.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 05:55 PM
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...Don't watch the Documentary with Joaquin Phoenix, titled 'Earthlings'. you'll never buy meat from the supermarket again.

seriously watch it, it's on youtube

DONT WATCH IT!!!
edit on 14-6-2017 by rexsblues because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

No worries. Although I do think the ATS community needs to have a debate eventually about what should be, or not be "published sources".

Strictly speaking anything, even social media like Twitter or Facebook are published sources.

But that's a whole different can of worms.

I mentioned my source, it is and remains published with further references, and members can take it further from there.
If it turns out to be false the relevant webmasters should deal with it.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 11:15 PM
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Good for sharing, brings up a topic not often talked about or known of.

Here's a fair article on it:

"27 animals died during filming of Hollywood blockbuster The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, says report"

In 2011, unfortunately 27 animals did perish on the set of the Hobbit. While the Humane aspect of animals in movies has improved greatly over the years, it's not full proof against being 100 percent humane. Accidents happen anywhere with people and animals, that is a given, though of course the carelessness claims is more of an issue. With that it should be addressed.



Writing to condemn the animal deaths during production on The Hobbit last year, Dr Robin Ganzert, the chief executive of the AHA, said: “We do not have either the jurisdiction or funding to extend oversight to activities or conditions off-set or before animals come under our protection. “There are too many incidents off the set and this must stop. It is vital that we work with the industry to bring the kind of protection we have for animals during filming to all phases of production.”


The article discusses other movies, the AHA and more.



A number of animals were injured or killed during the production of some of last year’s biggest blockbusters, including Life of Pi and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, while the HBO horse-racing drama Luck was cancelled after four horses died during filming.

The report by The Hollywood Reporter accuses the American Humane Association (AHA) – the issuer of the familiar “no animals were harmed” credit – of not only failing to protect animals on set, but also of covering up those lapses.

Source



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