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The human brain sees the world as an 11-dimensional multiverse

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posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

I'd say it is already common just not utilized by us humans enough. Animals utilizing, of course, may be another story.




posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 05:02 AM
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My brain is processing 23 dimensions.
This machine has been modified.
It has a cam.

edit on 14-6-2017 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: and14263

I dont think we can perceive a 4 dimensional object , but the brain can interpret those objects and information from those dimensions and filter it into what works for us , there is obviously far more going on under the surface of our grey matter than we can even begin to comprehend.

Our brains are just receiving consciousness antennas , and once it comes in we break it down into whatever chunks if data make sense in the 3rd dimension, maybe all the other data we dont know what it does yet, but maybe it feeds into our subconscious mind for later, or gets used in rewriting our DNA

I think our DNA is like a harddisk, or SSD , and the Brain is basically the processor and WIFI connection to the super hub called consciousness.

Or something like that hahaah

cool video



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: slapjacks

This just makes me think that we will never create an AI as advanced as our brain, the more we look the greater the human brain appears

fascinating



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: slapjacks

I've been wanting to talk about this subject for a while. For some time now, I've been taking medication for PTSD. I have noticed that sometimes I almost faint or get the "holy crap I'm about to pass out" feeling.

When this happens, I fight it. I never fully pass out.

During this time, I've learned to focus. When I do that, it seems I go to an "alternate universe".

Everything looks the same, but there is a vibration running through my body the whole time. And my visuals look a little brighter. I also get a metallic taste on my tongue.

Once and only once I felt like I shrunk in hight about 3 inches.

It lasts about 15 seconds.

Then I'm back to normal.

I think some drugs can alter something in ones brain and you can somehow travel from one reality to others.
edit on 14-6-2017 by galaga because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 08:43 AM
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The writers of this article are guilty of a mathematical confusion. Trying to generalise causal connections between objects in the brain beyond 3-d space would be legitimate only if these higher dimensions are macroscopic. But superstring theory predicts that the six higher dimensions are microscopic, as does its generalisation to M-theory, except that now there are seven curled-up dimensions. So it is totally wrong to conceive of higher-dimensional structures in the brain because superstrings extend only in six such dimensions, whilst M-theory requires E8xE8 heterotic superstrings to be confined to two 10-dimensional space-time sheets separated by a narrow gap that extends along the tenth spatial dimension. Superstrings do not move along this dimension; only gravity acts across this gap. It is only meaningful to regard brain structures existing in 4-d space-time, even though they are composed of superstrings that exist in ten dimensions.

It is also wrong to use the term "multiverse" in this context. It applies only to a version of inflation theory, in which our universe is merely one among many universes created by bubbles of different phases of the Higgs field inflating at the time of the Big Bang. Incorrect use of this term indicates that the article has NOT been written by professional scientists who understand properly concepts of cosmology and theoretical physics.



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: galaga

I would have to agree with your last sentence :0



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 06:51 PM
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Simply wow. Makes you really think about the saying that we only use a portion of our brains. a reply to: slapjacks



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: micpsi



A review and update of a controversial 20-year-old theory of consciousness published in Physics of Life Reviews claims that consciousness derives from deeper level, finer scale activities inside brain neurons. The recent discovery of quantum vibrations in "microtubules" inside brain neurons corroborates this theory, according to review authors Stuart Hameroff and Sir Roger Penrose. They suggest that EEG rhythms (brain waves) also derive from deeper level microtubule vibrations, and that from a practical standpoint, treating brain microtubule vibrations could benefit a host of mental, neurological, and cognitive conditions.

The theory, called "orchestrated objective reduction" ('Orch OR'), was first put forward in the mid-1990s by eminent mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose, FRS, Mathematical Institute and Wadham College, University of Oxford, and prominent anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff, MD, Anesthesiology, Psychology and Center for Consciousness Studies, The University of Arizona, Tucson. They suggested that quantum vibrational computations in microtubules were "orchestrated" ("Orch") by synaptic inputs and memory stored in microtubules, and terminated by Penrose "objective reduction" ('OR'), hence "Orch OR." Microtubules are major components of the cell structural skeleton
.


Read more at: phys.org...

Your discussing a level 2 multiverse as if this is the only way to comprehend it.

That would be incorrect...

en.wikipedia.org...

To what extent are you familiar with algebraic topology?



posted on Jun, 15 2017 @ 05:50 PM
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originally posted by: galaga
a reply to: slapjacks

I've been wanting to talk about this subject for a while. For some time now, I've been taking medication for PTSD. I have noticed that sometimes I almost faint or get the "holy crap I'm about to pass out" feeling.

When this happens, I fight it. I never fully pass out.

During this time, I've learned to focus. When I do that, it seems I go to an "alternate universe".

Everything looks the same, but there is a vibration running through my body the whole time. And my visuals look a little brighter. I also get a metallic taste on my tongue.

Once and only once I felt like I shrunk in hight about 3 inches.

It lasts about 15 seconds.

Then I'm back to normal.

I think some drugs can alter something in ones brain and you can somehow travel from one reality to others.


That sounds like your blood pressure is too low. I was on medication for high blood pressure, and the doc prescribed medication that was a tad too strong. I could go along all morning until about 11am until I started getting the "shimmers" - people and anything moving would leave sparkling trails of color behind them. Went to the doc to get my blood pressure measured and they said they were amazed I was still conscious.

Here is one of the latest diffusion MRI images of the wiring of the brain:

www.itnonline.com...

It's really like the wiring of a supercomputer with all those nerve bundles allowing fast communication.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 05:40 AM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
wired.com - The Mind-Boggling Math That (Maybe) Mapped the Brain in 11 Dimensions.
I was wondering how they know the simulated brain in the computer is behaving anything like a real brain, and I think I found my answer in that link...I'm not sure they do:


Two years before, the European Union had awarded Markram $1.3 billion to spend the next decade building a computerized human brain. But not long after, hundreds of EU scientists revolted against that initiative, the Human Brain Project. In the summer of 2015, they penned an open letter questioning the scientific value of the project and threatening to boycott unless it was reformed. Two independent reviews agreed with the critics, and the Human Brain Project downgraded Markram’s involvement. It was into this turbulent atmosphere that Blue Brain announced its modest progress on its bit of simulated rat cortex.

While some saw potential for the in silico brain slice to open up novel analysis pipelines, many others viewed the paper as proof that the idea was a colossal waste of money. Moritz, Helmstaedter, director of the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, said at the time that the paper confirmed his worst suspicions about the project: “There are no real findings. Putting together lots and lots of data does not create new science.”
I have no way of knowing if this study is complete garbage, it might be for all I know, but as that excerpt indicates, I'm not the only one with concerns. Also concerned are many other scientists and two independent review agencies.

The director of the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research who is quoted above seems to think this line of "research" is not helpful.

edit on 2017616 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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Interestingly enough Blue Brain project was given 1.3 billion dollars towards its research.


www.wired.com...



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

There's a slight hesitation on my part because the guy who runs the experiment also published the article. Which of course is confirmation bias by default.

The other part is the brain is not just electrical signals being passed around but is also hormones, amino acids (as in, DNA modification), timing signals (alpha, beta, delta, waves synchronizing activity), and what ever chemicals it may be under the influence of, including imbalances.

I'm not certain that A) There is a "normal" to compare to; or, B) That like you said, they have really modeled the brain.

That is why I actually gave up on AI... the brain is extremely complex and you need to study neuroscience to know what is happening.

After reading Scientific America's book about neuroscience, I came to the conclusion that we still don't know.

Cool about the 11-dimensions of brain activity as a math structure but too bad the NY Post muffed the punt because the topic is now split or completely wrong which we've already pointed out.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 10:58 PM
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if the brain sees the world in 11 dimensions then why cant i imagine a 5D cube?



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: TzarChasm

I think I can, I think I can, I know I can...



The article used advanced math and equated it theoretical physics. Uh, epic fail on their part.

I bet you could imagine a 5-D object if you wanted to! You just have to choose the 5th one!!

Tell us what you find!!




posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


Why, because theoretical physics doe not apply advanced math to form conclusions???

In 5D location in so far as we commonly relate to would be irrelevant.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

There's no agreement on what order the other dimensions should be in!!

The first, what, 4 dimensions seem to be the same but after that you have to choose a theory to defend. In math, the order is arbitrary so to align with physics they have to be the same. And that was NY Post's problem.

Q: What order of "dimensions" are you talking about?

A: "I don't know. Uh, this one goes to 11?"
edit on 17-6-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: Tap into America'



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF


Which does not mean that the math does not apply to something physical???

This is kind of weird, you do understand space-time is curved?

You do understand that mass as something to do with that?

Perhaps you could elaborate upon what exactly IYH opinion are the results?

As far as what you think is going on?

In relation to how you think you know?

the way your left toe feels when you think about such an idea, that does not count.


Truthfully this is an interesting topic to discuss.

Any thoughts?

edit on 17-6-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 01:37 AM
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Its his day job.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:29 AM
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originally posted by: Kashai
a reply to: micpsi



A review and update of a controversial 20-year-old theory of consciousness published in Physics of Life Reviews claims that consciousness derives from deeper level, finer scale activities inside brain neurons. The recent discovery of quantum vibrations in "microtubules" inside brain neurons corroborates this theory, according to review authors Stuart Hameroff and Sir Roger Penrose. They suggest that EEG rhythms (brain waves) also derive from deeper level microtubule vibrations, and that from a practical standpoint, treating brain microtubule vibrations could benefit a host of mental, neurological, and cognitive conditions.

The theory, called "orchestrated objective reduction" ('Orch OR'), was first put forward in the mid-1990s by eminent mathematical physicist Sir Roger Penrose, FRS, Mathematical Institute and Wadham College, University of Oxford, and prominent anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff, MD, Anesthesiology, Psychology and Center for Consciousness Studies, The University of Arizona, Tucson. They suggested that quantum vibrational computations in microtubules were "orchestrated" ("Orch") by synaptic inputs and memory stored in microtubules, and terminated by Penrose "objective reduction" ('OR'), hence "Orch OR." Microtubules are major components of the cell structural skeleton
.


Read more at: phys.org...

Your discussing a level 2 multiverse as if this is the only way to comprehend it.

That would be incorrect...

No, it wouldn't. I was pointing out the incontrovertible fact that the term "multiverse" ORIGINALLY comes from a version of inflation theory in cosmology proposed by Andre Lande and others (see here). It is THAT sense (Max Tegmark's Level 2 multiverse) in which the word is normally used and certainly meant in the article. It is entirely inappropriate in the context of this quantum theory of consciousness, being introduced merely to make the theory sound scientific, whereas it is not. Ask most physicists and they will tell you that they have no time for Penrose's theory that quantum gravity causes collapse of the wavepacket as the mechanism for the generation of consciousness. Penrose also does not believe in the multiverse concept, so he would dissociate himself from this article with that word in its title.

originally posted by: Kashai
To what extent are you familiar with algebraic topology?



I am very familiar with it.



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