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Any practicing Buddhists about?

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posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 10:57 AM
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So, I've become very interested in Buddhism over the last year but because of school, I haven't had a lot of time to spend on it. I have read a few books, some new, some old and have milled around on Buddhist websites reading but I haven't had the chance to actually talk to any practicing buddhist.

What led you to your choice to become Buddhist? I am interested in hearing your stories. Also, what branch of Buddhism do you practice? And what are the major differences between these branches. I've kinda read some about the difference but am just starting to really explore them now that my school is out for the summer.

I have been so far been drawn more towards Mahayana Buddhism but I'd like to hear from anyone.
edit on 13-6-2017 by GAOTU789 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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a reply to: GAOTU789

Here's a thread I posted on Taoism:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Taoism is somewhat philosophical basis for Buddhism.



Chung-ying Cheng, a Chinese philosopher, views Taoism as a religion that has been embedded into Chinese history and tradition. "Whether Confucianism, Daoism, or later Chinese Buddhism, they all fall into this pattern of thinking and organizing and in this sense remain religious, even though individually and intellectually they also assume forms of philosophy and practical wisdom."[21] Chung-ying Cheng also noted that the Daoist view of heaven flows mainly from "observation and meditation, [though] the teaching of the way (dao) can also include the way of heaven independently of human nature".[21] In Chinese history, the three religions of Buddhism, Daoism and Confucianism stand on their own independent views, and yet are "involved in a process of attempting to find harmonization and convergence among themselves, so that we can speak of a 'unity of three religious teaching' (sanjiao heyi)".[22]


Chinese culture and people are not as belligerent as Americans. The Chinese have practically invented everything. It's a good culture to study.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015


"Chinese culture and people are not as belligerent as Americans. The Chinese have practically invented everything. It's a good culture to study."

You should have stopped with the quoted material from the other source. You do realize that the Chinese people these days want nothing to do with any religion? In particular, they have been brutally savage with Mongolia?



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: GAOTU789

I am not a Buddhist but I identified for a long time with Buddhist teachings.
I should warn you, although at first it may appear different, Buddhism is like any other religion.

The reason I stopped identifying with being a Buddhist was because I realized the things I liked about it could be found in any poetic expression of truth or wisdom throughout the ages. The beautiful thing about Buddhist wisdom is that it is very common. In other words you don't need Buddhism to practice Buddhism, and it doesn't have a monopoly on truth.

It is very interesting to study though. You will find a lot in there. It's full of interesting and beautiful stories. Buddha was a lion king.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:43 AM
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Thank you.

Interesting thread. I've thought about reading the Tao Te Ching as well, as I have read in a few places that it is embedded within the philosophy of Buddhism. And it just looks like a really interesting read to me.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: 0racle

Thank you.

I have gotten that feeling from what I have studied so far( although that amount is minuscule to be honest ) and thank you for the warning. I am not interested in belonging to a religion per se but in learning about myself. From what I have read so far, Buddhism closely mirrors my own world view more closely than anything else I have encountered, so exploring it seemed prudent.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: GAOTU789

I will be following this thread!

I have always been drawn to Buddhism, the teachings and the way of life they talk about. It seems to resonate most with me. I recently found out there was a Buddhist center about 30 mins from my house. I went this past Sunday and it was amazing! They had meditation for two hours then a lesson at the end. After that everyone was invited to lunch, it was soooo good too! It was a soup with veggies and potatoes, salad, homemade bread and fruit with some tea. Everyone I met was so friendly and willing to help. I am new to it so I didn't know what to really do. I mediate on my own and only recently at home but I use crystals with my meditation, where Buddhism doesn't. I dont need the crystals for meditation but they help me with grounding.

The center itself is small but it's beautiful. They have 3 huge buddha states that are the largest in the state! It was so pleasant and quiet. I spent almost 4 hours there. I read and wrote in my journal while sitting on various benches that had Buddhist sayings. It was quite nice! Here is a picture of me with one of the massive Buddha statues.




posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: dfnj2015


"Chinese culture and people are not as belligerent as Americans. The Chinese have practically invented everything. It's a good culture to study."

You should have stopped with the quoted material from the other source. You do realize that the Chinese people these days want nothing to do with any religion? In particular, they have been brutally savage with Mongolia?


That's a pretty broad brush you are a painting with. Not exactly my experiences.

But overall, the Chinese do not have this list to be proud of:

Timeline of United States military operations

When I was in Beijing I found the people to be very nice. So of the parks and gardens we went to were breathtaking. I get the Chinese government doesn't always have the best record when it comes to human rights. There are 1.3 billion people in China so they must be doing something right.

I would almost all the Chinese people I have dealt with in business have been very nice people. I really like China and Chinese people.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: GAOTU789
Thank you.

Interesting thread. I've thought about reading the Tao Te Ching as well, as I have read in a few places that it is embedded within the philosophy of Buddhism. And it just looks like a really interesting read to me.


Not all the translations are good. The one I referenced is a good one:

u.osu.edu...



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: mblahnikluver

I seen a couple of the pics you posted. Unfortunately, I don't have anything like a temple near here to go to ask questions so I thought I'd start here since we have such a wide demographic of people from all over the world on ATS. I'm looking for other outlets as well to have discussions on the subject too.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015 My full respects to your nice thread, friend... however Buddhism and Taoism are very very different things. Even they have been at "conflict" on quite some occasions through history, as their core principle differs as meat from vegetables. Tao is philosophy, Buddhism is organized religion. You can practice Buddhism in any of its variants, but you can only "follow" the Tao. The different sects of Buddhism all have goals, the Tao does not.


Just clarifying things, so less knowledgeable people don't get confused with your quick proposition here, dfnj2015. And one last point, I am aware the there are recent movements(last 200 years) which mix taoist and buddhist principles. The funny thing is that this movements are more followed in the Western Word, than their homeland.


For the OP: Friend, there is more Buddhist sects existing, than kung-Fu fighting styles out there. You are jumping into a great exploration field. Whatever choice you make be prepared for long long ride with sudden psychological triple axels.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
Chinese culture and people are not as belligerent as Americans. The Chinese have practically invented everything. It's a good culture to study.

Yeah, but they are still reeling from the lost generation.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: Argentbenign

Thank you.

I have realized that there are a great many different sects from the little research I have done so far. And I appreciate the heads up. Is it reasonable to say that the farther south you go in Asia, the more diversity in practice happens? That doesn't really include the Western world, mostly because I have spent no time looking at Buddhism in the West as of yet and how it differs from the Eastern Religion.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: Argentbenign

I thought they were the same thing. Thanks for correctly my ignorance.

I was hoping to avoid your kind of post which is why I included the quote which was really my point in talking Taoism at all:



Chung-ying Cheng, a Chinese philosopher, views Taoism as a religion that has been embedded into Chinese history and tradition. "Whether Confucianism, Daoism, or later Chinese Buddhism, they all fall into this pattern of thinking and organizing and in this sense remain religious, even though individually and intellectually they also assume forms of philosophy and practical wisdom."[21] Chung-ying Cheng also noted that the Daoist view of heaven flows mainly from "observation and meditation, [though] the teaching of the way (dao) can also include the way of heaven independently of human nature".[21] In Chinese history, the three religions of Buddhism, Daoism and Confucianism stand on their own independent views, and yet are "involved in a process of attempting to find harmonization and convergence among themselves, so that we can speak of a 'unity of three religious teaching' (sanjiao heyi)".[22]



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: dfnj2015


"Chinese culture and people are not as belligerent as Americans. The Chinese have practically invented everything. It's a good culture to study."

You should have stopped with the quoted material from the other source. You do realize that the Chinese people these days want nothing to do with any religion? In particular, they have been brutally savage with Mongolia?


That's a pretty broad brush you are a painting with. Not exactly my experiences.

But overall, the Chinese do not have this list to be proud of:

Timeline of United States military operations

When I was in Beijing I found the people to be very nice. So of the parks and gardens we went to were breathtaking. I get the Chinese government doesn't always have the best record when it comes to human rights. There are 1.3 billion people in China so they must be doing something right.

I would almost all the Chinese people I have dealt with in business have been very nice people. I really like China and Chinese people.


You ignore the obvious point of my response to your poorly contrived support of the Chinese across the board. Do you not see where your jumping from Buddhism to supporting the Chinese is, really, off topic?



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: GAOTU789

Yeah, and the further back in time you go, the more Buddhist sects there were.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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Buddhism just came naturally to me, at a certain point in my life (around the end of high school and in college). Fortunately I was also good enough at languages and philosophy to study it deeply, with scholarships, academically for many years and also as yogi-meditator. I strongly recommend taking a college course, and also, reading Buddhist scriptures or sutras -- and not merely popular introductory manuals, which are often helpful but also, sometimes incomplete or watered-down. Seek out people with reputations as knowledgeable scholars or meditators, and examine those people and their message carefully. Be a bit skeptical, and don't take the appearance of robes or holiness too seriously. Buddhism is an organized religion, and the more organized and big-time it is, the more corruption generally. So as with anything else, caveat emptor.
edit on 13-6-2017 by Namdru because: spelling



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:56 PM
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Buddhism (like any spiritual discipline) isn't something that can be understood through study and reason.

They call their meditation their "practice", and for good reason--you have to practice at it every day to be any good at it, like playing a musical instrument. It is fundamental to their worship and spiritual growth.

You will have more success "learning Buddhism" if you put the books down and focus on your practice. You will gain more spiritual knowledge that way than by any other means.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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Yes Im Buddhist. As another poster said, it came naturally to me. Im not super religious. Buddhism just makes sense to me and gives me some helpful guidelines.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: GAOTU789

You're welcome. 0racle and NthOther seemed to answered already your question. I would add only one thing: Consider spending reading some time as well in Hinduism, as this being the Mother of Buddhism, it is a must to understand.



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