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Mandela Effect - You Can Dance If You Want To - Or Not?

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posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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ahh i knew the proper one before i clicked thread #debunked




posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: UnBreakable

firstly, I remember it we can dance also. Secondly, I did nothing of the sort as far as proving your point goes. You may have either logical evaluation skills deficiency or something if you think I did.

Look at what the Mandela effect is and try to understand it, then get back to me.

Hint: You or I remembering it one way, does not negate how many others may remember it and does not dispel the possibility of it being a mandela effect that has nothing to do with bad memory...

Jaden



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 10:16 AM
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originally posted by: eisegesis

Does anyone else remember the lyrics starting "You can dance if you want to"?

NO.


Does anyone else remember when ATS catered to intellectuals?


NO I DON'T... BUT I REMEMBER WHEN WE ALL KEPT A OPEN MIND ABOUT STUFF!!!

Please STFU or GTFO. i'm on the fence about this crap myself, leaning heavilty towards it being B/S. but bozo's like you who come here to make themselves feel superior by shouting it down aren't help a damn thing.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Crumbles

So this all powerful time altering perception entities can change time, but not a few memes on the internet?

Do you realise how absolutely absurd that is?



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 10:54 AM
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Well I don't know anything anymore because;
Spicoli in Fast Times at Ridgemont High
says after crashing his friends car
"Don't worry my Dad has an ULTIMATE set of tools"
and not 'AWESOME set of tools', and NO ONE remembers
that.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:23 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar

originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
I mean what else could explain it .. faulty memory?


It's not "faulty" memory.
ME's are a result of our amazing memory that gets tricked occasionally.

Calling it "faulty" memory is equivalent to saying 3D movies work because of "faulty" vision.

The two are not alike at all. One is due to an error, the other is not.


They are exactly the same, our brains fill in the blanks and create an illusion.
Whether it's remembering Berenstein because no other names end in stain or remembering 2 rows of seats in the JFK car because no other cars have 3 rows. It's still (much like a 3D movie) our brains doing work we are unaware of resulting in us distorting our own perception of reality.

ME's are a symptom of our memory and not a flaw in it.

People claiming it's just "faulty" memory are clouding the issue and giving the soon to be tax exempt ME'ers ammunition.

If you are completely unaffected by any ME's then you have the faulty memory.
Everyone who experiences ME's on the other hand have a perfectly working memory.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar
ME's are a symptom of our memory and not a flaw in it.

Except they are not alike, because when you recall a memory you then record it again. At this point you can record a false memory. So for 20 years you can think it was one thing .. then you get a faulty memory where it changes, and you think it was the new thing all 20 years and will swear it never changed that is what it always was. Except it's due to an error. It is not supposed to work that way, something went wrong. With your vision that is how it's supposed to work.

www.psychologytoday.com...

So someone may recall very vividly where they were when JFK was assassinated. They can describe it in great detail including the red coffee cup they held. It is and always was red. Except 10 years ago they said it was blue.

No one has a perfectly working memory. EVERYONE has faults in their memory. Everyone. Then there is the issue of hearing the lyrics wrong and getting it wrong the first time and hearing it wrong every time after that because of the initial error.
edit on 13-6-2017 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So what part of that link actually relates to what you are saying?

Your argument seems to depend on me not looking at your link and that everyone remembering Berenstein instead of Berenstain is just a coincidence.

Memories are created each time we remember, they are not stored and played back with a cumulative degradation.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

No, it only takes one time. You can think for 20 years it was We can dance .. then there is a transcription error making you remember You can dance .. and you will think you thought it was You can dance your whole life when in fact you thought it was We can dance until recently.

Or you can hear it wrong, they say we you hear you .. and for the rest of your life the lyrics were you can dance every time you hear it. It's amazing when a song comes on and I know the lyrics and I hear every word perfect even with the volume lowered and the window down. Then a song I don't know comes on and the volume is too low and the wind too loud and I cant for the life of me hear anything they are saying. It's not my ears, it's my mind telling me what was being sung and me hearing it more from my memory than from my ears.

There is no ME, only people who are mistaken.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
No one has a perfectly working memory. EVERYONE has faults in their memory. Everyone. Then there is the issue of hearing the lyrics wrong and getting it wrong the first time and hearing it wrong every time after that because of the initial error.


Perfect was probably a strong word.
Mistakes such as the Berenstein thing are what should be expected in a perfectly healthy brain.

The idea that memory is a movie we play back is the core of your misunderstanding here I think.

It's more like a movie we write, cast and direct.
We spellcheck the cast names and end up with Berenstein because that makes sense.
We get a JFK car with 2 rows of seats because that makes sense.
We write Looney Toons because they're toons and that makes sense.(Provided you ignore the whole Merrie Melodies part)
etc. etc.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

There is no misunderstanding for me.

Everything you just posted is support for ME not existing, I agree.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

There is no misunderstanding for me.

Everything you just posted is support for ME not existing, I agree.


No it isn't.

Everything I posted supports that what is perceived as ME is a real phenomena caused by how we process and recall information.

It's not evil nerds, or alternate dimensions. We definitely agree on that, however the simplistic answer of faulty memory is incorrect and only empowers those who want to believe in ghosts and goblins.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

Of course it's a real phenomena, it's well documented. I linked a source showing one way in which it occurs.

Faulty memory is not incorrect, but it's simplistic.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Some people definitely have better memory than others.

Do you think someone with a bad memory would be more susceptible to ME's?



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: Pearj

I remember it as "we", though I can see why people would say that it's "you" with so many examples of it.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

Not necessarily. They may recognize they have a bad memory and chalk it up to that since it is so common. If you have a good memory you can usually rely on and then something is off you will be more likely to look for the problem outside of yourself. My opinion only.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: Pearj

Please don't misconstrue Occam's Razor. It doesn't mean that the simplest explanation is the correct one. Instead, it's a technique that can be used to imagine theoretical outcomes, not to divine laws of the universe. Some of the simplest explanations will be correct, while others, upon testing, will be proven wrong.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I'll try and reword the question, who would be more likely to remember Berenstein instead of Berenstain.
Mr good memory or Mr bad memory?

My position is that it's irrelevant which is why I'm so frustrated by the "faulty memory" answer.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

Faulty memory is ONE explanation, but I agree it is not the whole explanation. There's a lot of reasons people come up with the wrong spelling etc. It could be incorrect initial learning.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So do you believe Mr good memory has an advantage over Mr bad memory in regards to the spelling of Berenstain?

It's not a trick question, I'm just trying to understand your position.
Culture and learning can play a part for sure, Ukranian Jews are less likely to get it wrong.

But sticking to the question do you have an answer?



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