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Mandela Effect - You Can Dance If You Want To - Or Not?

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posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 02:59 AM
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originally posted by: Finspiracy

originally posted by: consigliere
a reply to: Finspiracy

The fact you question your sanity means your just fine fin.


Thank you for encouragement. I also add that i like your signature.

Two things i would really like to know about Mandela effect:

1. What causes it?
2. Why it doesn't have influence on everyone?

But i am still thankful it is only minor details that change. Stuff in pop culture, maybe a line in song lyrics or something. It can be disturbing and it can haunt me in my head quite a bit if i think about it too much. But it is not like my mom is a completely different person or my social security number has suddenly changed.


Let's examine that a moment. OK if you believe in say parallel universes why is it say only one word changed?? We have two writers on two different worlds create a song but only change one word?? Does that even make sense since a parallel world to make the same song means that the writer had the same influences in both places.

Next if parallel world's exist which I believe they do but the distances involved would be mind boggling. How can someone transport billion's of light years without noticing.

And finally why does this never happen to a scientist were say a new experiment in physics occurred. Or a doctor to notice an anatomy change. Or a pilot as the controls change. Oddly it never effects things people know like there job.




posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 03:09 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

Maybe if there is an infinite number of parallel universes, meaning that all possible outcomes of a situation will happen. Like we here have the song by Queen - We are the champions. Somewhere it is Queen - We are the losers. Somewhere it is King - We are the jellyfish. And so on.

The most reasonable explanation of course is that i have a faulty memory even in such instances that i would guarantee "this is the way this thing is and period". Otherwise, i don't have difficulties admitting that i am wrong about something, i often am and then i try to educate myself a bit to know better in the future.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 05:29 AM
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originally posted by: Pearj
a reply to: Josephus

Not all those that wander are lost.


What?



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 07:57 AM
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Despite what some have said here, I do think millions are Effected. (Consider many naysayers say they remember it the same way we do - but don't believe in themselves.. Others haven't even heard of the ME yet.)

So yeah - millions affected.

How is millions of people remembering the same "incorrect" thing the simplest solution?

Take JFK - I know it was a four seater.. I watched a documentary about the shooting just a month or two before this hit. Tons of other people remember the same thing.. It's not because of the FBI reenactment - the reenactment was an accurate portrayal of that day (including the 4 seater). You don't hear Effected saying it was a 4 seater because all limos are 4 seaters..

So how is "bad memory" the simplest solution when we all remember the same thing wrong?

Bad memory would imply we'd all remember different things.

Why do naysayers keep going down the same road - that doesn't even seem to use their Occam's razor shield?


edit on 12-6-2017 by Pearj because: he replied when he ment to post to all.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 08:16 AM
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originally posted by: Abysha
a reply to: Pearj
It was specifically because it targeted the listener.


The song was an invitation to the listener to join in. The singer is essentially asking someone to dance with them.

Just look at the first verse:


Ah we can dance if we want to, we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don't dance and if they don't dance
Well they're are no friends of mine


Changing "we" to "you" would work to an extent, but "we" makes more sense, especially in the context of the entire song.

Also, remember that it started off as a protest song. The singer is representing those (including himself, which was the origin of the song) who were being told that they couldn't pogo in nightclubs. The song is about "we" (including the singer) having the freedom to do it.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: Pearj

This intrigued me and I happen to have the original 7 inch release so just gave it a spin.....

It's 'we', starting with the first line.

Sorry, it didn't take long did it? I don't know if you have vinyl stores or charity shops where you live but I'm betting it wouldn't take too long to find the original release. If they ever performed it live, swapping 'we' to you, I have no idea. If bands have covered it and got the words wrong, that's their problem, probably bought about by bad memory.
edit on 12-6-2017 by uncommitted because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 09:54 AM
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originally posted by: blackadder01

originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance

I miss the 80's.


The 80s were good weren't they, I miss that era too.


70's and 80's were the best times to be a kid. Everyone still played outside and technology was starting to come around like the arcade and portable music players. Computers were still for scientists and accountants.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: wickd_waze

They were good times despite a select few crappy songs



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: uncommitted

What needs to be understood about Mandela effect, is that the changed things would be changed universally and through times. Therefore, in case of say Berenstein vs Berenstain, finding an old book from grandpa's garage is nothing.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Finspiracy
a reply to: uncommitted

What needs to be understood about Mandela effect, is that the changed things would be changed universally and through times. Therefore, in case of say Berenstein vs Berenstain, finding an old book from grandpa's garage is nothing.


That's if you believe the Mandela effect is a real thing, not someone's recollection being faulty.

Of course if you believe it as fact then that's your prerogative, but I know that isn't how you thought yesterday.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: uncommitted

The concept of Mandela effect remains the same no matter what i think about it on a given day.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:29 PM
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originally posted by: Pearj

How is millions of people remembering the same "incorrect" thing the simplest solution?

Bad memory would imply we'd all remember different things.



You are only counting the people who do remember it the same way. The people who remember it differently, or the correct way, don't get caught up in this fad. So selection bias is making you see a pattern that doesn't exist. It's not like you've done a scientific survey. Bottom line is you have no way of knowing whether the data you are seeing is unusual or not. For all we know the number of cases we see in which people tend to remember the same wrong thing is to be totally expected by random chance.
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posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: Finspiracy
a reply to: uncommitted

The concept of Mandela effect remains the same no matter what i think about it on a given day.


That's not what you wrote yesterday. Anyway, to describe it as a concept is giving a fad more credit than it deserves.

Having said that, I'm convinced that How deep is your love by the Bee Gees had a line that went 'and you come to me on a submarine', but some people nowadays swear blind it's 'and you come to me on a summer breeze', ha, like that even makes sense.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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originally posted by: uncommitted
That's not what you wrote yesterday. Anyway, to describe it as a concept is giving a fad more credit than it deserves.


Fair enough.

English is not my native language. What i was trying to say that mandela effect as a "thing" is what it is regardless of believing or disbelieving it. The changes happen without leaving residue behind. Although some claims have been made of residue on some ME cases.

Edit: Above i made no claims of ME being true or untrue. It just would be cool if the participants of the conversation understood the topic they are talking about.
edit on 12-6-2017 by Finspiracy because: clarification



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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I always thought Yoda told Luke in Empire Strikes Back that "always emotion is the future". The actual line is "always in motion is the future". Why isn't this the mandela effect? Simply because I haven't used the power of the internet to gather into one place the people who remember the line in this way.
edit on 12-6-2017 by Tearman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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While a lot of the ME resonate with me (dilemna, Caldwell, C3POs leg, bracers, etc..), this is not one of them. I purchased that tape (man I feel old now) when I was a kid. It was we can dance as far back as I can recall, and if I sang it "you can dance," it would sound really odd to me.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:54 PM
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One more of a million songs where people got words wrong.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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I still think there are a number of ME that are probably just faulty memories. They are just getting tossed onto the ME pile with anything that is legitimate. Depend vs. Depends for example.

But some ME stand out more than others, like Caldwell and dilemna. There are discussions about dilemna that have nothing to do with ME, where people (including English teachers), can't figure out how educators and public across the world got a word so wrong in a weird way. Teachers who taught it spelled as dilemna, and seem confused how it is spelled now. Or the lion and the lamb being the wolf and the lamb.. where a priest of 20 + years says it's changed from what it once was. Or Coldwell where TV ads, newspaper ads and supposedly people WORKING for the company call it Caldwell. Even the spellchecker on this site thinks it's Caldwell! Why would so many people remember what would be a common spelling such a wrong way? Coldwell would be much easier to remember. Caldwell is harder to say and pronounce. Yet of all the ways people could get Coldwell, they all get it wrong in that particularly weird and hard to say wrong way?
edit on 12-6-2017 by fleabit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 01:13 PM
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originally posted by: fleabit Depend vs. Depends for example.

What's the controversy here?



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: fleabit Depend vs. Depends for example.

What's the controversy here?


For that one in particular? Many say they recall it as Depends, but it just Depend. But honestly aside from jokes about adult diapers, how often do people actually interact with the word? So that is almost certainly just a mistake, not an ME.

Dilemna (dillema) and Caldwell (Coldwell) however.. are very strange to me.




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