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Ticks and Lyme disease 06/10/17

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posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: beachbound

Yes, the itching bite can take months to heal. Some people say they had one for a year. I'm using Tea Tree oil, apple vinegar and a brand new tincture of Amanita and Yew - killer one, 30% peroxide if it's itching. It has to be some kind of virus in their saliva.
I'd like to believe nothing can survive in such a white oxidized hole but sometimes it's just white itching hole. The immune system may be in panic when it sees your mind's reaction.




posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 08:22 AM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

3 members of 1 family are infected. My Emergency Response Team coordinator has Lyme disease and is in an almost unheard of situation. He goes all over the world, but lives out of the city on a farm backed up to woods. Unknown how he got it and when.

His wife has Lyme as well....believed to have acquired it during Hurricane Katrina while relief efforts kept her there for weeks.

Their teenage daughter has 3 of the 5 markers for Lyme Disease so considered "positive". 3 in one family is almost unheard of...but obviously not impossible.

*Folks...if you like me enjoy the woods in any fashion? Inspect your body frequently and any open patches of exposed skin for ant, fleas, ticks and chigger bites of any dug in holding on. Try and remove any you find. Tweezers are effective in quick removal.

Deer dont have to be present for one to come in contact with any of the above. It can be a frequented area by wildlife. Take care all...

MS
EMT/ERT
1st Responder
Michigan
edit on 10-6-2017 by mysterioustranger because: oops



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: jtma508

Oh man, this sounds so unpleasant. You had a peripherally inserted central catheter dosing you antibiotics for a month?
Can you do your business or you must be in bed?
No jokes, this is how it should probably look like but I have not only entonophobia - fear of ticks but fear of needles too.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 09:19 AM
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Back in the 80s my wife and myself visited friends in the US , travelled bottom to top . Anyways we were in Whitefish Montana and after showering went back to the rv where my wife said you didnt shower to well . Seems i had a tick under the skin behind my knee . Went inside the house where our friends were and it was like a well orchestrated drill . One needle i swear was as big as a knitting needle , heat the tip up then shove it in under the ticks date . I swear this thing jumped out like the baby alien in alien the movie , damn thing was fast too . Lyme disease , i think not , i am at the age where most of those symptoms occur naturally .
edit on 10-6-2017 by hutch622 because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-6-2017 by hutch622 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 09:43 AM
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A few years back in Virginia beach,Va.....a lot of people fell mysteriously ill. And a few people died from the illness.....My boss at the time was one of the people mysteriously seriously ill. He had a 104 fever , nausea , headache, body ache, the whole shabang....and it got worse as the days went on. He was hospitalized in Sentara hospital for weeks. ...the first few days he was in the hospital, others died from the illness, and they told his wife to,get his affairs in order. .....here was a man, my boss, who was a navy seal for 30 years, and one of the strongest and most level headed boss's I knew, suddenly crumpled to nothing ....it was really scary ! ....... The CDC was called in and they quickly found the problem in a few days.... All these people had been bitten by "the Lone star tick " on a golf course. ....The Lone star tick carries a disease called " Erlichiosis " ....the toxic protein in its bite if left untreated will shut down your liver ,white blood cells, and kidneys ......the lone star tick is not native to Virginia beach , or normally found in the east coast . So the doctors did not test for it. .....my boss was saved by mass injections of a specific antibiotic. It took him months to get back to normal......the theory from CDC is that through the past years with all the hurricanes and displaced animals ...adoption centers have been shuffling the pets up the east coast and and re-adopting them into other parts of the US . Along with the pets comes the ticks . And the lone star tick has now been integrated into new parts of the US .
edit on 10-6-2017 by Meldionne1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

I'm using my ridiculously sharp knife the sencond I see it. I just shave it off flat asap. I can't stand it inside. Only sometimes there's some black mouthpart left inside so I get it out with a tip of the knife or with a needle.
I believe the worst thing to do is to squeeze it in any way because of the Lyme in its stomach. Maybe some remains could actually start up a proper immune reaction. It's only a feed for thought. I don't practice it.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

Ticks were not around back in my day, I can remember walking through the woods and not getting anything, then there was that so called accident at PLUM ISLAND, (I guess they were developed there) were some of the ticks accidentally got out and according to reports hitched rides on birds, no the darn things are everywhere, wonder if any of this is true, makes one wonder



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ




I'm using my ridiculously sharp knife the sencond I see it.


I had absolutely no idea that it was there . Luckily it was behind my knee and not in the groin somewhere .



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 10:17 AM
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Here on the farm we use vaseline or grease. Seems the little critters breathe out of their ass when their head is buried in your skin. Sometimes it takes up to 30 minutes, but they let go and release their mouth parts to back out so they can breathe. They don't seem to release any stomach contents when backing out. Make sure you use a pair of slip joint pliers to squeeze the little suckers to death once they are out. The reason we squeeze them to death is because we have a septic tank system and they will find a way out if you flush them still alive.

Every weekend I go over my two Labs to remove their ticks. I take an old hammer and pop them on the driveway concrete.

Ticks and fleas are one of the reasons I quit hunting. I have nothing against hunters or guns, BTW, just hate the all the little blood suckers that cover an animal, seems like more than ever these years. I don't remember an animal having so many fleas and ticks on it when I was younger. When the animal assumes room temperature these things jump everywhere. So if you hunt, be careful. I believe they make bags, now, that can be used to put animals in when you transport them to your house or the slaughter house.

I remember several years ago, the drought was so bad, every catfish I caught had at least two ticks on it...



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

No wonder. You have to feel it before it bites.

...the ticks emit saliva, which makes sucking blood easier. Normally hosts do not feel this happening because tick saliva contains several bio-active molecules (analgesics, anticoagulants, anticomplementary blood factors and immunosuppressive agents) that act to prevent the bite area from being painful. Saliva of Ixodes ricinus-European tick contains proteins capable of inhibiting a host organism’s immune response


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posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: 19KTankCommander
a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

Ticks were not around back in my day, I can remember walking through the woods and not getting anything, then there was that so called accident at PLUM ISLAND, (I guess they were developed there) were some of the ticks accidentally got out and according to reports hitched rides on birds, no the darn things are everywhere, wonder if any of this is true, makes one wonder


I don't think anyone will be able to develop anything so complex anytime soon if ever. You probably mean they modified Lyme bacteria from syphilis. Yea, I've read that too.

Edit: HOWEVER, I can imagine it came from some cursed King Kong island. It would be interresting to look into some history books
edit on 10/6/2017 by PapagiorgioCZ because: a little improvement



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 10:25 AM
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Tons more in my part of the world too, Highland Scotland. Can barely go outside into grass without getting one or two of the little sods now.

Partly it's climate change, we're not getting long cold winters like we used to.

Partly it's increased deer numbers.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Painterz

Exactly, deers need to die. ) The places where wild fire burns the land can have 5 fold more ticks few years later because of deers. They need wolves to keep moving and dying. They found out this in Yosemite or Yellowstone back then. Without wolves there were no trees because of these punks so they imported a pack or two.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ

The very best way to avoid them is to place mothballs around the perimeter of your lawn...or your flat or whatever. They hate the scent, and so do ants, spiders, crickets, mayflies and just about every other insect out there. And they don't lose their potency over time either, but I recommend replacing them once a month.

However, something bothers me...particularly the joints, chronic fatigue...that doesn't sound like Lyme. I thought I had the same thing, only it went on for years, and every test was negative. It turned out to be systemic lupus. Lyme disease is not a chronic condition, and there would be circular lesions on your skin. That's why I thought I had Lyme, actually. Turned out it was enormous hives caused by my immune system attacking itself and perceiving ordinary things as allergens.

One medicinal piece of advice from me is, detox your body by consuming organic apple cider vinegar mixed with distilled water at least once a day, and get some black cumin seed oil. Take one to two teaspoons twice a day...it tastes like oregano...and stick to the regimen even if you don't see immediate results. That little seed put my lupus, which I've suffered with for going on twenty years, into complete remission. And it happened in less than two weeks. It's one of the most powerful anti-inflammatory substances on the planet, and I promise you it works. I don't make promises lightly, by the way.




posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 11:16 AM
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Doctor Says Cannabidiol Paste Could Be A Potential Cure for Lyme Disease
I have personally seen people get relief from Lyme disease with the use of cannabis. Nothing to constitute a cure per say. But certainly worth looking into.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

Thank you for a great advice. Autoimmune disorder is my next guess too. The atopic dermatitis looks to be a clear sign but do you know what can cause autoimmune disorders? I thought it's vaccination or even tooth decay and nothing else but Lyme is messing with the immune system like this. There has to be a cause.
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How much of the apple cider vinegar worked for you? I'll give it a try.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 11:30 AM
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If a tick carries lyme disease it usually takes 24 and often 48 hours for it to infect you. So, if you are in an area where ticks are prevalent make sure you check yourself regularly and if you find a tick, remove it carefully using a proper tick remover (only cost a few £ and readily available from outdoor equipment shops in the UK and, presumably, elsewhere).

The O Tom tick remover is the best known one in the UK and works well

More info:

www.lymediseaseaction.org.uk...

Some insect repellents - such as Smidge (in the UK) should help repel ticks as well as midges. But dont rely on them! Marigold oil is also supposedly effective and, whether or not coincidence, when I have used it Ive not (knowingly) picked up a tick.
edit on 10-6-2017 by AndyMayhew because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: 19KTankCommander

Interesting theory concerning Plum Island. My paranoid buddy down the street believes that there couldn't possibly be enough host animals to create such a large population of ticks, so he came up with a CT he calls "Operation Tick Drop" where helicopters fly over and dump them on the land below. He thinks that this is a way to help the NWO in their human population control agenda by spreading diseases. Considering how long it took for the medical community to admit that Lyme disease exists and that doctors are generally reluctant to test for it, I can give his idea some merit I suppose, but it seems way too far out for me to believe.

Personally I believe that around the late 1800s, after deforestation and over hunting of game animals, the tick population experienced a population crash until conservation efforts in the early 20th century started to bring back the forests and game animals. Back in the late 1970s, there was a huge deer population in Michigan that began to be thinned out by the late 1980s due to the increase in hunting permits for does.

Now, even though the deer population is considerably lower, the habitat for all fur bearing animals is greater. Certainly the predator population has increased since the 1980s. Coyotes, wolves, cougars and bears are doing pretty well in Michigan these days, with smaller game animals doing pretty well too. I think that this rebound of wild animals has allowed the ticks to thrive and over populate.

Ticks can survive without host blood for a couple of years and as far as the winter is concerned, I haven't read that has any effect on their population. I would think that they are cozy warm living on their hosts through the winter. They do need a certain amount of moisture to survive, so a drought would probably reduce their numbers. They tend to avoid full direct sunlight, but prefer tall grasses and low growing brush when "questing" for a host, so they will endure the sun to catch their next meal.

Although the wood tick is by far the most common tick in Michigan, I had picked up one or two Lone Star ticks when I worked at a park near the river. They never got attached to me, but they have unique markings, are rather large and easy to spot. Squeezing the body and forcing a back flow into your skin can get you infected, but I normally find them soon enough to simply pluck them off with my fingers.

Also, to correct my late statements, the wood tick can transmit spotted tick fever and a couple of other diseases, but I imagine that only happens after they have started feeding, something that will take a few hours up to a day after settling in on your body somewhere.

I'm almost glad that others are noticing the up-tick in the tick population as I can at least consider myself not overly paranoid about the increase I've seen on my property. I'm fairly certain that with the logging I've done in the past 6 years that the wild animal population on the property has increased as have the tall grasses and low growing brush.

The post about finding catfish with ticks is amazing and most likely would be thought to be impossible by the so-called experts who swear they don't jump down from the trees, something I know to be fact. I guess that the experts don't realize that raccoons, opossums, porcupines and squirrels live in trees and ticks occasionally feed on birds even though they prefer mammals.

I've joked for years that I was a chick magnet in my younger days, but now that I'm so old, I'm just a tick magnet. So true as it seems that I can be in the same area as other people and be the only one who picks up a tick.



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: AndyMayhew

I'm afraid this 24 - 48 hours time to infect is not true. Wait if I can find the paper

There we go:

"Patmas and Remora reported on a case of Lyme disease that was transmitted after only 6 hours of attachment by a deer tick. The authors concluded that, “The current recommendation against treatment of shortduration tick bites may need reconsideration.”(1994)"



A literature review has determined that in animal models, transmission can occur in less than 16 hours, and the minimum attachment time for transmission of infection has never been established. Mechanisms for early transmission of spirochetes have been proposed based on their presence in different organs of the tick. Studies have found systemic infection and the presence of spirochetes in the tick salivary glands prior to feeding, which could result in cases of rapid transmission. Also, there is evidence that spirochete transmission times and virulence depend upon the tick and Borrelia species. These factors support anecdotal evidence that Borrelia infection can occur in humans within a short time after tick attachment.


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edit on 10/6/2017 by PapagiorgioCZ because: yeah

edit on 10/6/2017 by PapagiorgioCZ because: filled out



posted on Jun, 10 2017 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: PapagiorgioCZ



Where are you located ?



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