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UK Election , Oh How We Laughed

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posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: gortex

originally posted by: DaveEngland
a reply to: gortex

I never give a # about my wounds if ive won the fight claiming the cigar lol

Won the fight ?
LOL indeed.


Not one single member of The Tory Party who has appeared on The TV today has had a smile on his or her face.

Strange that.





posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 04:55 PM
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a reply to: DaveEngland





you are gutted your man jezza cant form a government in the uk.


Do i sound gutted?

I am anything but. In fact i can't stop laughing about the shambles that is The Tory Party.




posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 04:55 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Not one single smiling labour, libdem or snp member can form a government over the UK as prime minister lol
Id rather be a frowning leader holding the trophy after a cup of tea with the queen than being all happy as opposition parties lol
you lost, winning is forming a govt, your boy jezza cant lmao



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong
the shambles ruling you because your boy jezza lost lol, yeh i get that, must hurt bad



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: DaveEngland

You and i have a major difference here.

As a life long Labour Party supporter i never expected to win. In fact i feared it would finish far worse than it did,

However you did expect The Tories to win and with a much larger majority than the last parliament.


How disappointed you must be.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 05:20 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: gortex

Please explain UK politics to me, because I'm struggling with how this is working as an American.
1. Your system allows your PM to call for unscheduled elections at their whim?
2. May's party ended up with 318 seats against 261 held by the opposition... in the US Congress this would be a massive advantage for the 318 side. What is it in the UK system that makes this a bad thing for May's party?
3. If May's party already held the majority, why in the blue hell did the dummy call for a special election in the first place?
4. All the talk in the US media of her stepping down from PM to be replaced by her rival is confusing. Do UK voters vote for the PM, or is the PM selected in some other fashion?


1. It used to be at the discretion of the PM but was changed only a few years ago. Now, a motion can be brought to Parliament, but it requires 2/3rds of the House of Commons to vote in favour before an unscheduled election can be held.

2. Because if all the smalller parties teamed up with the opposition, they would have more votes that the Conservatives. The Tories have the most seats (compared to the other parties) but do not have more than half of the total seats available. This is why the Tories are now talking about a special agreement with one of the smaller parties - if that smaller party agrees to vote the same way as the Tories, the Tories will now know that they can count on enough votes to pass legislation (assuming everybody votes as directed, which they are not obliged to do).

3. It was a small majority. All it would take is a small handful of people refusing to vote along party lines and the Tories would be unable to push through legislation. This is probably more important now than ever, as Brexit is going to be a very difficult time with lots of painful decisions to make. May was hoping that recent splits and problems in the Labour party had weakened them enough for the Tories to pick up some more seats.

There are other possible longer-term tactical implications as well - if not for this election, the next election would have fallen as Brexit went nuclear and the government of the day would be most unpopular and guarantee a Labour landslide. Calling it now pushes the next election date out by 2 more years, which gives the government the chance to get past the most dangerous point and hopefully start to demonstrate some recovery and growth.

4. You actually vote for your local MP, choosing the person that you feel best able to protect your individual and regional interests in Parliament. In theory, the party is irrelevant. In practice, people have no idea who their MP is so they just vote for parties.

The "PM" (which historically was never actually a position, it's a title born out of customs and convention) is simply the person that the Queen feels commands the "confidence" of the House of Commons. By custom - and logic - it's generally considered that the leader of whichever party holds the most seats will command the confidence of the House. This leader can, and does, change. Theresa May, in fact, was not originally elected. The previous PM resigned and, as May was nominated as the new Tory party leader, she became the new PM.

However, it also depends on what you mean by "rival". The above refers to a rival Tory MP taking over leadership of the party. If you mean the rival party's leader (Corbyn) then it's a little different. If Corbyn could convincingly demonstrate that HE has the confidence of the House - for example, if he formed a coalition that included all the other smaller parties and thereby had control over the most seats - then he should be the PM. I don't think he is going exactly down this road, however. I think he is just claiming that the smaller parties are very unlikely to vote in line with the Tories but quite likely to vote in line with Labour, therefore he holds the confidence of the House. So, not forming coalitions, but pointing out that the end result is likely to be the same.

This is why The Conservatives have been forced to enter into this arrangement with the Westboro Baptist Church... err... I mean DUP... sorry, easy mistake to make. It gives them the ability to say they hold sway over enough seats to reach a majority in the House.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: DaveEngland

You and i have a major difference here.

As a life long Labour Party supporter i never expected to win. In fact i feared it would finish far worse than it did,

However you did expect The Tories to win and with a much larger majority than the last parliament.


How disappointed you must be.


no not at all, the tories are forming the next government in totally legal mannor, but your man jezza is not, because even if he calls all his mates he cant get a 50% majority of mp's in parliament, but May can with a phonecall to the DUP party female leader and 9 other mp's lmfao.

And again you come out with rubbish about what you perceive me to feel emotionally, how would anyone be disappointed about winning more votes than any other UK party and forming the new government as prime minister. No emotions here, just pointing out that your man jezza can do nothing to stop it lol.
edit on 9-6-2017 by DaveEngland because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-6-2017 by DaveEngland because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 05:44 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: DaveEngland





sinn fein (republicans former ira)


You know bugger all about politics.

Sinn Fein was founded in 1905. The IRA 1919.




It's a surprisingly good assessment, actually. Sinn Fein was traditionally seen as the "political" arm of the IRA. Since gaining more acceptance in both the North and South of Ireland, SF have gradually drifted away from the paramilitaries and have become a more traditional republicanist party. Their traditional stance of not sitting (ie winning positions but not actually turning up) has loosened over the years as they became more "mainstream", and SF now have representatives in all sorts of places that would never have happened at the height of the Troubles.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: EvillerBob

They could disband the DUP/comnservative govt in a heartbeat by bull#ting the queen at the oath for political reasons and attending parliament.
Easier than killing people to stop a con/dup govt, but ego comes into it, can't be seen to bull# the authority system, just shoot or kneecap people insted. scum.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:03 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong

originally posted by: DaveEngland
a reply to: alldaylong

you saying sinn fein are not hand in hand with ira now? you are getting desperate and delusional lmao, nobody in the real world denies that, really desperate rubbish argument
typical jezza supporter denying links with terrorists, at least I dont deny DUP dirty links of there own unionist terroriist past. maybe read more?


Let me educate you.

The IRA where a group formed during The Easter Uprising in the island of Ireland.

You are mistaking them for The Provisional IRA who are not the same thing.


You might want to do some educatin' of your own. You said earlier that the IRA was formed in 1919. The Easter Rebellion was in 1916. The IRA was actually formed in 1917, so you're wrong either way.

It's actually a bit of a trick question as the term "IRA" has been in use for hundreds of years. 1917 was the birth of what we now call the "Old IRA", it's first formal incarnation, and was born out of the IV who had fought (along with other groups) in the Rebellion under the direction of the IRB.

If I was in a kind mood, I'd grant you that the basis for what was to become the IRA was laid during the Rebellion, but it's late and I'm cranky, so no.

They certainly loved their snappily-titled groups. The IRB, ICA, and IV fought HMAF in D during the ER. Clear as mud!



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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Here`s a vidio about May and her choice of an ally, (DUP) to keep her in power. desperate? lol


www.facebook.com...



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
a reply to: DaveEngland

However you did expect The Tories to win and with a much larger majority than the last parliament.

The Tories won. Do you think holding the position of prime minmister and forming a government through deals given the royal assent of the queen is losing?
I think being leader of the opposition in parliament, not in government is losing.
Which bit of that is delusional as you like to claim?
Please do explain like an adult who can discuss stuff we disagree about. Lame photo's and gifs of newspaper frontpages dont add support to your arguments.
Your boy Jezza lost, and I'd say he won if he was forming a government, he isn't, May is, and the queen is totally cool with it as she signed the deal off lol



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: illuminnaughty

who cares, jezza lost, he isn't forming a govt, but woulod have tried with multiple political parties if he could.
He couldn't lol, that is why he is the loser.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: DaveEngland
a reply to: illuminnaughty

who cares, jezza lost, he isn't forming a govt, but woulod have tried with multiple political parties if he could.


I'm not sure if he would, actually. The next few years are going to be trouble. The party in the driving seat is going to get heavily scarred.

He might be happy that he's got enough seats to cause trouble, but can let the Tories catch all the bullets from Brexit. It's tactically quite a good position to be in, possibly better than winning outright at this stage.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:25 PM
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originally posted by: [post=22335311]seagull
Plus I love watching the House of Commons in action--only thing missing sometimes are mp's calling each other out...



Not to forget that in the wake of the Panama Papers scandal, Speaker Bercow the Cuckold kicked Dennis Skinner out of Parliament for calling the then Prime Minister, 'Dodgy Dave'.



Not the first Speaker to eject the man for speaking out. Trouble is, establishment media in this country always portray Skinner as a joke, not to be taken seriously.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: EvillerBob
He lost though, that is pretty much all ive been defending here.
He is not forming the next government as PM, that is obviously the prize of the game.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: DaveEngland

..shes won striking a deal with the DUP,


I agree with Cambell's take on this coalition.


www.independent.co.uk...


There has been no government in Stormont since January when Sinn Fein withdrew from the power sharing agreement agreed in 2007 after current DUP First Minister Arlene Foster refused to resign over a financial scandal.




jezza is leader of the OPPOSITION in parliament


Good thing that; at times like these, we need as many principled MP's in opposition as we can get. They may have their work cut out for them.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: teapot

Lol he flip flops on policies and would sell the UK out to keep the peace. He is weak.
Theresa May is weak, but not as weak as lame jezza, he's a 70's socialist prick lol

HE IS NOT FORMING ANY GOVERNMENT, HE LOST THE ELECTION TO BE LEADER OF THE UK
LMFAO

May is forming a government, she won, just lost more tackles in the match

edit on 9-6-2017 by DaveEngland because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: yorkshirelad

Then there is the young whose voting numbers have gone from 7% to 70% and they are predominantly Remain Labour and they are p.ssed off with brexiters who will be dead in 20 years and they have seen that voting does make a difference.


From the NME


‘The youth-quake happened’ – Music and entertainment world react to UK general election result

www.nme.com...



www.nme.com...

Mike Williams, NME editor-in-chief, says: “A lot of talk during this election has been about whether young people would bother to get out and vote. They did, in huge numbers, and on a scale not seen in the UK in recent years. We at NME are incredibly proud to see this, and it’s further proof that young people in the UK are massively engaged with politics in 2017.”


Williams goes on to say he thinks there is still too much political apathy amongst the youth. I think that with publications such as NME investing in political research and reporting on political issues along with ease of access to the net and other forms of meta-media (that May wants to curb), political awareness will continue to grow in the UK and we may yet see the first truly politically astute generation.



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: teapot

Yorkshirelad is just an angry northern bloke who cries about anything reasonable from what I see, never friendly, just aggressive socialist northern anger.
lame as #



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