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ATS-Did you forget today's D-DAY?

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posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: Tardacus

Sometime, just sometimes, people have to stand when others can't, or won't.

That may be something that we're forgetting in this day and age of ten second attention spans, and two minute sound bites.




posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 10:18 PM
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My late father in law was there. He never spoke about it. He still carried shrapnel in his body from it. Once a year he would go to a reunion with his surviving buddies. My mother in law would stay at home. There were always fewer and fewer guys.

I love you, Poppy! Wherever you are, I hope you're at peace.





posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 11:04 PM
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For some reason I have never forgotten what happened on this day. I was not there, I was born 11 years after it happened, but as a child I had this set of history books and I was always drawn to this period in history and never understood why. In later years as I've thought about this day, learned about the details and imagined what it must have been like, what has amazed me the most is that so many of those that played a roll were really just kids at the time.

What scares me is that I see so little of what it took to be part of operation,in so many of the screen zombies around us today. As long as beer is cheap, sports are on TV and food is available, no one pays attention anymore. At some point we will need people like us to break the binds we have been enslaved in.This was such a pivotal day in history and had to be done at the time. My hat's off to all of those with the balls needed for that day.. Thank you!



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: WhatsaFripp

Oh, it's there. Maybe not in the vast quantity of that particular generation, but then again, it's not been needed, either.

Sometimes you have to squint to see it, but as an example, when hurricanes hit in the the Gulf Coast, or Atlantic coast, people come together to help each other, because that's what people do. Not for reward, or fame, but because it's the right thing to do.

Other instances of the same sort of spirit are evident if you look hard enough, and ignore, as best you're able, the 24 hr bad news cycle...



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 11:53 PM
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Color me confused, didn't we do this one in November or December already? o.O



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Pearl Harbor Attack is Dec 7th 1941.



posted on Jun, 6 2017 @ 11:57 PM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
a reply to: Nyiah

Pearl Harbor Attack is Dec 7th 1941.

It is? I could have sworn D Day was in the winter, PH in the summer...



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 12:02 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Would it make sense to launch the largest amphibious invasion ever in history in winter?

Hawaii on the other hand is like in the high 70s during "winter".



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 12:06 AM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
a reply to: Nyiah

Would it make sense to launch the largest amphibious invasion ever in history in winter?

Hawaii on the other hand is like in the high 70s during "winter".

I honestly couldn't tell ya there. Thanks for clarifying the dates, though.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Here's hoping it doesn't spawn a new ME.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: seagull

I don't understand how everyone commenting seem to be speaking from the heart for the most part yet, I'm the first one to come along and give you a star for that beautiful poem?
That just doesn't seem right too me.

That poem was the epitome of all wars past present and probably future as we still have the same jerk politicians just with different names, playing the same games that get in into these wars over and over.

I wish just once the soldiers on both sides would lay down their guns and say if you want to fight, come do it yourself. I have a family at home and a life to live.

Anyhow, that poem was beautiful seagull.




posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 06:42 AM
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Written by Juno Veteran Cyril Crain:

Come and stand in memory
Of men who fought and died
They gave their lives in Normandy
Remember them with pride.

Soldiers, Airman, sailors
Airborne and marines
Who in civvy life were tailors
and men who worked machines.

British and Canadian
And men from USA
Forces from the Commonwealth
They all were there that day

To Juno, Sword and Utah
Beaches of renown
Also Gold and Omaha
That’s where the ramps went down.

The battle raged in Normandy
Many lives were lost
The war must end in victory
And this must be the cost

When my life is over
And I reach the other side
I’ll meet my friends from Normandy
And shake their hands with pride.


edit on 7/6/2017 by UKTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 06:51 AM
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My dad and a few friends of his recently took their Harley Davidsons on a tour of France from the UK. My dad visited the d-day beaches. He said to be even though you still have the odd bunker or two left for tourists, when he actually stood there and thought about what actually happened on those beaches 70 odd years ago you still get a chill down your spine and you can picture what happened on those beaches and that you got some sort of aura and odd feeling about the place



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: ThePeaceMaker

Any place where so many people died must surely have a "feel" about it. Call it ghosts, spirits, or auras. The same can be said for other battlefields, and also the concentration camps.




posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 07:35 PM
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The Horror of war



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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Y'know, I'm sitting here thinking about this, and I came to a realization that I'm old enough to have been the majority of those boys (men by any other measure other than age...) father, even grandfather...

I'm 53 years old, and at the moment, feeling every bit of those years...

That's a revelation that I'm just not quite sure what to think. I think of my nieces, and nephews, all of whom would have been of around those ages, and sending them off to a war not knowing if I'd ever see them again, this side of Heaven...

Imagine, the only source of news parents, wives, siblings, and children was sitting around the radio. Letters could be months in making the trip home. Or the knock on the door with a telegram from the War Dept.

I sent my youngest brother off to war, two tours in Iraq...and I distinctly remember when I watched the news and reports came in from areas he was in...watching for a familiar face, to know that he was, at least for the moment, safe and sound. ...and I had access to forms of information that were barely dreamed of, much less a reality... How much worse for my Mom who watched all three of her brothers go off to war? Never knowing. Always dreading that knock... My grandmother? Two of her boys, my Dad was one (though he went to the Pacific, not Europe...not 'til much later anyway.), went off to war as well.

Those soldiers were without a doubt a brave, brave lot--my respect is boundless. But so too is my respect for what the folks at home did, never knowing if their boy came through OK.

Spare a moment for the fighters in the Resistance, too. How much courage would it take to defy the Gestapo, knowing capture would result in a prolonged death in their loving embrace, or an even longer death at a camp?

I think about this, and I'm in awe. So many men and women, whether volunteer or draftee, American, British, Canadian, French, and dozens of others, all standing to against an evil the likes of which few of us can even begin to fathom.

My deepest, most humble respect to those brave ones who've gone before, and those who are still with us.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: seagull

Such a beautiful, incredible beautiful post.

Thank you.

peace



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: introvert

The Germans had ran out of money. In fact they had to resort to abandon tanks in the fields, as well as ships and u-boats because they did not have the resources to repair them, or because they ran out of oil.

BTW, long before the war the Germans had also been able to store oil "for the future" bought from the Soviet Union and Romania for years. So we could also say that thanks to the Soviet Union and Romania the Germans were able to wage the war far longer than they would have without the help from the Soviet Union and Romania.



posted on Jun, 8 2017 @ 04:04 AM
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a reply to: silo13
Your sentiment is appreciated.
Cheers to you good sir...



posted on Jun, 9 2017 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

I dunno why everyone thinks I'm a man child but nope, I'm a chick.

But I do apprecaite your thanks, though all thanks should go to those who served and are serving!



peace



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