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Alberta surgeon pioneers transplant for diabetics

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posted on Feb, 5 2005 @ 01:29 AM
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Dr. James Shapiro, who led the University of Alberta team that developed the 'Edmonton Protocol' which transplants islet cells from donated pancreases, performed the world's first transplant of islet cells from a live donor. This is a huge step forward as previously they could only use cells from the pancreas of deceased donors, sometimes meaning a wait of up to three years.

Of the 72 of patients who have had the inslet transfusions from organ donation, almost all started producing insulin and the majority were able to stop using injections.



Dr. James Shapiro and Japanese surgeons removed part of the pancreas from a 56-year-old woman and took out insulin-producing cells called islets. Then they successfully transplanted them in the woman's 27-year-old daughter.

cbc


This is great news for people with diabetes.




posted on Feb, 5 2005 @ 01:36 AM
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Sounds like great news! I have seen the effects, first hand, of what this disease can do to the body over time. Things are looking promising for diabetics today, especially children. Good info.



posted on Feb, 5 2005 @ 01:46 AM
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Thats excellent news! my neices husband died last year of pancreatic cancer, he was only 36. This may lead to the possibility of a [pancreas transplant and save lives.



posted on Feb, 5 2005 @ 06:47 PM
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Here some links to more information about the Edmonton Protocol, for those who are not familiar with the procedure.

Diabetes breakthrough has patients off insulin injections
Child diabetics could undergo islet cell transplants
Islet Graft Assessment in the Edmonton Protocol

[edit on 5-2-2005 by Duzey]



posted on Feb, 5 2005 @ 06:57 PM
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Originally posted by instar
Thats excellent news! my neices husband died last year of pancreatic cancer, he was only 36. This may lead to the possibility of a [pancreas transplant and save lives.



Instar - I am sorry your niece lost her husband. ...But you need to know doctors have been performing pancreas transplants for a long time - like with other organs, there are long waiting lists. ...which is why cell transplants and stem cell therapies are so important.

Still, you might want to find out why their doctor didn't tell them about the possibility of a transplant. Sometimes, insurance companies put a gag order on doctors so they don't have to pay for expensive procedures - these tricks have to be stopped! She may have grounds for legal action...


International Pancreas Transplant Registry

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[edit on 5-2-2005 by soficrow]



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