It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Could we soon REVERSE death? US company to start trials in Latin America

page: 2
16
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 05:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: burdman30ott6
Can't yet cure the common cold, but by God we're gonna reanimate the dead.

...and people wonder why there is an ever growing number of Americans who distrust and have disdain for secular humanists and their science preachers.

You do know there's several hundred different strains of the common cold, right? They tend to mutate to survive, they're highly adaptable viruses.




posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 06:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Nyiah

I do realize that.

Here's my issue: Prion disease is one of the very few "scientifically accepted" zombie-like ailments science fiction has brought us. Unless I am misunderstanding things, diseases like Mad Cow disease and CJD are caused by prions created when stray peptides mutate brain and spinal tissue. These diseases act like seeds when the healthy are exposed, creating the same illness in healthy populations. This process involves actively injecting peptides into spines and brains and then exposing the tissue to mutagenic accelerators like lasers and radiation. This is the type of madness that could end up as a mass extinction event if it goes wrong.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 06:31 PM
link   
a reply to: TobyFlenderson



Erm, maybe? ...



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 06:35 PM
link   

originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: neoholographic


These are good news for brain-dead libtards.


Only if "news" is plural. Really, what this does in ensure more than one possibility of Spinal Tap reunion gigs.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 06:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: 4003fireglo

originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: neoholographic


These are good news for brain-dead libtards.


Only if "news" is plural. Really, what this does in ensure more than one possibility of Spinal Tap reunion gigs.


You bring up an excellent point!

Now, the Grateful Dead really can be and they can have that reunion tour.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 06:50 PM
link   
From the article:


Could we soon REVERSE death? US company to start trials 'reawakening the dead' in Latin America 'in a few months' - and this is how they'll do it

Speaking to MailOnline last year, Pastor said: 'The mission of the ReAnima Project is to focus on clinical research in the state of brain death, or irreversible coma, in subjects who have recently met the Uniform Determination of Death Act criteria, but who are still on cardio-pulmonary or trophic support - a classification in many countries around the world known as a "living cadaver".'

As tempting and inevitable as it may be to crack jokes and invoke dramatic analogies, this experimental therapy aims to treat comatic states currently -- and perhaps incorrectly -- thought to be irreversible.

This is about saving lives, not raising the dead.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Majic

The initial zombie joke was only mostly a joke.

Start messing with a brain that is out of activity and who knows what or how you might revive it. It is a bit suspect that they are absconding to a third world country in order to carry out trials.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: olaru12
Zombie's right, that's all we need....

I'll pay extra to leave my mother in law alone...may she rest in peace.


They're not trying to reanimate people lol...they're talking about brain death. Neuro patients can be completely brain dead and still breathe...and even respond to pain stimuli, which is extremely disturbing to witness. No zombies or reanimated corpses...if the heart is not beating, the body will start to decompose, and nothing can reverse that.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mizzijr
Do you know how much trouble the Clintons would be in if this went live?


Ha...I am sure it would have the appropriate success rate to keep them safe.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:11 PM
link   
The first one they bring back might just scare them right out of the ICU room


The person might say some things that scare the doctors to death.
edit on 5-6-2017 by NoCorruptionAllowed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:13 PM
link   
a reply to: tigertatzen

Technically, there are fungi that for all practical intents and purposes hijack a host, turning it into a zombie.

Additionally, you have voodoo zombies who aren't and never have been dead.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:15 PM
link   
a reply to: neoholographic



The team said they planned to examine individuals aged 15-65 declared brain dead from a traumatic brain injury using MRI scans, in order to look for possible signs of brain death reversal.


I wish younger children would be included because they probably have the greatest chance of recovery.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mizzijr
Do you know how much trouble the Clintons would be in if this went live?


Best post award of 2017 goes to you



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 07:56 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Majic

The initial zombie joke was only mostly a joke.

Start messing with a brain that is out of activity and who knows what or how you might revive it. It is a bit suspect that they are absconding to a third world country in order to carry out trials.

I'm not knocking anyone for cracking jokes. After all, the Daily Mail couldn't resist sensationalizing the story -- not that the Daily Mail is any stranger to sensationalism.


There's no doubt that the nature of the experimentation is a magnet for controversy, whether successful or not. Given the social, legal, ethical, economic and theological issues involved, it's not surprising Bioquark would have to look outside the U.S. for test subjects, despite being a U.S. company.

To this day, "stem cell" is a loaded political term, and the current legal labyrinth surrounding notions of "death" and "experimenting on the dead" can render this type of research impossible in the U.S. That's also apparently true of India, given the decision of the Indian Council of Medical Research.

In light of that, it's really not surprising Bioquark would have to shop around for a country progressive or permissive enough to allow this sort of experimentation.

Of course, maybe this is all a scam of some kind, but it seems to me that if someone is truly "dead" and potentially destined to wilt away on life support or be chopped up to become an involuntary organ donor, then there's no practical harm in at least trying to give that person a chance to recover, however slight that chance may be.

It wasn't that long ago -- and in many places it's still the case -- that people were considered "dead" when they stopped breathing. Thanks to CPR, we now know that's not always true.

Maybe this is similar, maybe not.

Only one way to find out...



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 08:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: TobyFlenderson
a reply to: neoholographic
Second, what happens if the person comes back and is in extreme pain? Is severely mentally or physically handicapped? What if the person comes back and has no memory and is basically a giant infant?


Well, if they're operating in a 3rd world country, I'd imagine they'd just kill the person (again), send the family some money, and tell the public they never succeeded in reviving them in the first place.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 08:42 PM
link   
a reply to: trollz

Hence my ethical problem. I don't think medical research should kill people. That seems unethical to me. And probably illegal too.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 10:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: TobyFlenderson
a reply to: trollz

Hence my ethical problem. I don't think medical research should kill people. That seems unethical to me. And probably illegal too.

The only people eligible for this procedure are those already "dead" and beyond current medical aid. The researchers aren't proposing to kill anyone. If anything, their research has the potential to save people who aren't actually dead from being killed unnecessarily.

Is it ethical to condemn people for crimes they haven't committed and have no intention of committing?



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 10:09 PM
link   
a reply to: Majic

If you look at the question my post was responsive too, it posed that if something horrible happened to the patient, now living after being tested upon, they would simply kill it. The poster seemed to infer that it's okay because it's in the third world. That is the context of my statement.



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 10:24 PM
link   
a reply to: TobyFlenderson

Certainly, all of that is speculative, including the research itself. All of the "what ifs" apply to people who are already legally dead. And therein lies the rub.

What if these people aren't unrecoverably dead? Is experimenting on them any worse than chopping them up for parts, or tossing them in a casket and burying them?



posted on Jun, 5 2017 @ 10:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Majic

I think yes. In my original response I addressed this issue. There needs to be informed consent before death. The person may not want to be raised. Particularly if it results in extreme pain. If the person is revived and is in agony, what then? What if they are a raving lunatic? What if there memory is completely wiped and basically come back a giant infant?

That's why medical ethics are supposed to exist. These questions need to be answered, and morally, before the testing begins.



new topics

top topics



 
16
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join