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New images shows something unimaginable HUGE is buried beneath ancient Baalbek

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posted on Jun, 11 2017 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: Blackfinger


Yeh that how they did the small ones, the big ones would just crush the sledge.



My thought too. How could the ancients, with their primitive tools compared to today, have constructed a sledge that would hold 3,000 tons, when to transport a 340 ton boulder back in 2012 they had to use a custom-built 176-wheel transporter for the job.

-MM

No ancient structures contain a stone anywhere near 3,000 tons so the question is beside the point.
800 tons isn't too much for a sledge if the runners are a foot or two square in cross-section, depending of course on the type of wood used (balsa won't work nor will palm trees, for example.)

If it had been acceptable to drag your boulder down the highway, no custom-built transporter would have been required.

Harte


So, according to your logic, the engineers that moved the 340 ton boulder in 2012 obviously should have used a sled? And that a sled would have been cheaper and better than the 176-wheel transporter they had made for the hauling? If so, then you should give them a call, as they'll obviously hire you as a consultant for their next megalithic hauling job
...

-MM

Your straw man argument here is utterly transparent.
Do you believe a transport company can destroy an asphalt highway without repercussions?

In the future, perhaps you might respond to what I actually wrote, instead of whatever you would have preferred that I wrote.

Harte


That is my point; they did not even have asphalt roads back then, and do you claim that a 1,000 ton sled would not dig into the soil or push any stones in a paved road away? It just dosn't add up.

-MM
edit on 11-6-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 09:12 AM
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originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: Harte

Your straw man argument here is utterly transparent.
Do you believe a transport company can destroy an asphalt highway without repercussions?

In the future, perhaps you might respond to what I actually wrote, instead of whatever you would have preferred that I wrote.

Harte

That is my point; they did not even have asphalt roads back then, and do you claim that a 1,000 ton sled would not dig into the soil or push any stones in a paved road away? It just dosn't add up.
prefer
-MM

It adds up perfectly well, unless you prefer that it didn't, which appears to be the case here.
There's quite a difference between a permanent road meant for anyone to use and a road specifically built to move megaliths over.
Just one small example - asphalt trucks don't line the shoulders of highways, repairing the road after each vehicle passes.

Harte



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: norhoc

Tower of Babel was on the "plains of Shinar"; Babylon. Modern day Iraq.



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: bloodymarvelous

Anti Gravity reminds me of Coral Castle in Florida. Supposedly built single-handedly Two supposed witnesses of its construction said they saw the stones "floating like hydrogen balloons".



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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It would be difficult but with enough determination and the right motivations there isn't much that's impossible. Aren't some of the Obelisks that made it to Rome quite large? One is over 400 tons for sure. It could be done.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:20 AM
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Dumb question. Could GRAVITY have been LESS back then? We now know that the only constant in the universe is "change". Right?



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

The mass of the planet hasn't changed so I don't think current models of physics would allow for a change in gravity without a change in mass.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:38 PM
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originally posted by: Josephus
a reply to: bloodymarvelous

Anti Gravity reminds me of Coral Castle in Florida. Supposedly built single-handedly Two supposed witnesses of its construction said they saw the stones "floating like hydrogen balloons".



We visited there recently and I bought two books written by the people who lived there and knew Ed... and nobody made that claim. He had a friend's truck help him move some objects and he invited local shop classes to his workshop.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
Dumb question. Could GRAVITY have been LESS back then? We now know that the only constant in the universe is "change". Right?


No.

However, people aren't taking physics into account.

You can move very large things on sleds (particularly if you have horses or oxen (as the Romans did.) The weight does not crush the sled because it's distributed over a large area. Have you ever seen the feat where someone lies on a bed of nails? They couldn't STAND on that bed because their weight would drive the nails through their feet. But they can safely lie down because their weight is distributed over a large surface.



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 12:52 PM
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Advanced technology, yet they still used giant stones.


Hrmmm....



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:19 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: Harte

Your straw man argument here is utterly transparent.
Do you believe a transport company can destroy an asphalt highway without repercussions?

In the future, perhaps you might respond to what I actually wrote, instead of whatever you would have preferred that I wrote.

Harte

That is my point; they did not even have asphalt roads back then, and do you claim that a 1,000 ton sled would not dig into the soil or push any stones in a paved road away? It just dosn't add up.
prefer
-MM

It adds up perfectly well, unless you prefer that it didn't, which appears to be the case here.
There's quite a difference between a permanent road meant for anyone to use and a road specifically built to move megaliths over.
Just one small example - asphalt trucks don't line the shoulders of highways, repairing the road after each vehicle passes.

Harte


Then just how do you explain the ancients lifting these 1,000 ton++ blocks upwards and placing them in walls etc?



-MM

edit on 17-6-2017 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:22 AM
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originally posted by: Tempter
Advanced technology, yet they still used giant stones.


Hrmmm....


The 2nd Law of Thermodynamics dictates that even a solid block of gold (which is one of the least reactive elements) would disintegrate/become gold dust given enough time.

So, these places may be so old that everything has "rotted" away except the stones.

-MM



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 03:54 PM
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There is the view that humanity moves in a cycle: where we develop language and communities, become civilised, start fighting over territory then ultimately use weapons that wipe out everything we've ever done which plunges us into an Ice Age that turns civilised humans back into animals just fighting for survival.

The Greeks called the cycle of humanity the "Great Year".

This would explain all the advanced objects we find today. They are left over from previous civilisations such as ours.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:56 PM
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originally posted by: rottensociety
There is the view that humanity moves in a cycle: where we develop language and communities, become civilised, start fighting over territory then ultimately use weapons that wipe out everything we've ever done which plunges us into an Ice Age that turns civilised humans back into animals just fighting for survival.

The Greeks called the cycle of humanity the "Great Year".

This would explain all the advanced objects we find today. They are left over from previous civilisations such as ours.


Sure, I made a thread on just that earlier, see www.abovetopsecret.com...

-MM



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: Tempter


They built to last.It makes logical sense to make a building out of the stuff that's around where you want to build.You need a water source, if their are no stones around you use what's available.If you weave a frame out of saplings and then push clay into it, you have a house that doesn't cost a fortune.Or push the clay into a weaved structure then light a fire inside and voila you have a ceramic house.Mud brick lasts thousands of years but only stone says you are here to stay.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:49 AM
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it would be amusing if one of these sites turned out to be a tomb or prison of one of the Grigori, Alhazrad's Monsters of Death, or Greek Titans of yore.


and they bare great giants, whose height was three thousand ells


An ell is just over half a meter, making these mythical giants about 1.5 kilometers tall. I'm immediately reminded of Lovecraft stories, and finding something akin to a tomb made of numerous 1000-3000 ton stones seems fitting.

If we found the bones of something a mile long, would we know it was bones?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 02:52 AM
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White mans magic...?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 08:42 AM
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originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: Harte

Your straw man argument here is utterly transparent.
Do you believe a transport company can destroy an asphalt highway without repercussions?

In the future, perhaps you might respond to what I actually wrote, instead of whatever you would have preferred that I wrote.

Harte

That is my point; they did not even have asphalt roads back then, and do you claim that a 1,000 ton sled would not dig into the soil or push any stones in a paved road away? It just dosn't add up.
prefer
-MM

It adds up perfectly well, unless you prefer that it didn't, which appears to be the case here.
There's quite a difference between a permanent road meant for anyone to use and a road specifically built to move megaliths over.
Just one small example - asphalt trucks don't line the shoulders of highways, repairing the road after each vehicle passes.

Harte


Then just how do you explain the ancients lifting these 1,000 ton++ blocks upwards and placing them in walls etc?



-MM

Wasn't this already explained in this thread?
The largest stone btw is "only" around 800 tons.
Those stones were quarried uphill from the site. The were dragged into place over fill that was built up (behind the view in your pic) for exactly that purpose - to drag the stones into place.

There are some really big stones that have been lifted there, column drums that are oversized, cornices, etc. that had to be raised into place.

But we know the Romans were able to do this by looking at other Roman sites. Like, well, Rome for example.

Harte



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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originally posted by: MerkabaMeditation

originally posted by: Tempter
Advanced technology, yet they still used giant stones.


Hrmmm....


The 2nd Law of Thermodynamics dictates that even a solid block of gold (which is one of the least reactive elements) would disintegrate/become gold dust given enough time.

So, these places may be so old that everything has "rotted" away except the stones.

-MM

The second law says no such thing.

With quantum theory, there is a small probability that, given enough time, the atoms in your gold block will simply all fly off in different directions.

But the length of time involved is on the order of a thousand times the estimated lifetime of our universe.


Harte



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: Tempter


They built to last.It makes logical sense to make a building out of the stuff that's around where you want to build.You need a water source, if their are no stones around you use what's available.If you weave a frame out of saplings and then push clay into it, you have a house that doesn't cost a fortune.Or push the clay into a weaved structure then light a fire inside and voila you have a ceramic house.

Why not?
Yoda did it.

Harte




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