It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Resistance to Self- Relience

page: 1
10
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 31 2017 @ 09:53 PM
link   
I have been reading so many articles about governments attack on someone getting off the grid, becoming self reliant.

In a few years, my plan is to do so also. To become free from the electrical grid, from paying for electricity to paying for water.

My question, will I be able to with out being hassled from the government ?

Here, for example is an article about one such instance........


Every aspect of Kris Currie's home in New Dominion was designed to minimize energy usage — from the thickness of the walls, to the position of the windows, to the choice of appliances like a heat pump-powered clothes dryer. Even the paint colour on the interior walls was chosen to reflect natural sunlight, so no lights have to be on during the day. P.E.I.'s underwater electric cable project complete The result is what's known as a "net-zero home," meant to generate all the power it needs over the course of a year from the 35 solar panels on the roof. What Currie didn't know when he built the home is that "net-zero" doesn't apply when it comes to the HST.


www.cbc.ca...

HST is the harmonized sales tax imposed on the citizens of Canada ...


The harmonized sales tax (HST) is a consumption tax in Canada. It is used in provinces where both the federal goods and services tax (GST) and the regional provincial sales tax (PST) have been combined into a single value added sales tax.[1]


en.wikipedia.org...


Always trying to keep us from being self-reliant.


Despite the fact Currie pays nothing to Maritime Electric for his electricity, he's still billed for the HST on every kilowatt hour used, just like any other customer. "It's nonsense really. It should be exempt," Currie said. "We're using it for heat, for one. Oil's exempt. Now that we're producing electricity we're getting charged for it."


www.cbc.ca...

Crazy, I tell you. This just one example among many examples.

Please, share your stories.










posted on May, 31 2017 @ 09:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot


In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. Read more at: www.brainyquote.com...

Some say Ben Franklin, some say older literature. Regardless, not mine.

Some state laws trump feeding back into the system. My life goal is to be completely self-sustaining within my own property but ultimately, you'll still need to fork over tax dollars.

Not sure about the great north however.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:00 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot

OK, a few things.

Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

Now, dig a big ass hole in the ground and build an underground house.

Cover house up, hook up solar, independent water, etc.

You now have a dirt cheap house that you can turn into a mansion if you want and the tax-man and utilities know nothing.

Taxes on a trailer are almost nothing (usually a tax stamp every year of a hundred or two). Taxes on a few cheap acres are nothing (few hundred tops. I had 8 acres in the boonies and taxes were $400 a year).

Nobody will give you crap since they do not know that your main residence is even there.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: Groot


In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. Read more at: www.brainyquote.com...

Some say Ben Franklin, some say older literature. Regardless, not mine.

Some state laws trump feeding back into the system. My life goal is to be completely self-sustaining within my own property but ultimately, you'll still need to fork over tax dollars.

Not sure about the great north however.


Yeah, gone are the pioneer days, welcome to government and corporate greed.

Probably be restrictions on the chicken coop I build for my wife and taxed for every egg laid.




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:06 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot

IIRC is there not a huge swath of Canadian wilderness that no one really goes that is fully habitable? Could you start there?

If anywhere left in the world has the kind of area suited for truly off-the-grid living, it's Canada.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: Groot

OK, a few things.

Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

Now, dig a big ass hole in the ground and build an underground house.

Cover house up, hook up solar, independent water, etc.

You now have a dirt cheap house that you can turn into a mansion if you want and the tax-man and utilities know nothing.

Taxes on a trailer are almost nothing (usually a tax stamp every year of a hundred or two). Taxes on a few cheap acres are nothing (few hundred tops. I had 8 acres in the boonies and taxes were $400 a year).

Nobody will give you crap since they do not know that your main residence is even there.


That IS my plan when I retire in a few years, thing is, can I find a place to do so in like, maybe Tennessee ?




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: Groot

IIRC is there not a huge swath of Canadian wilderness that no one really goes that is fully habitable? Could you start there?

If anywhere left in the world has the kind of area suited for truly off-the-grid living, it's Canada.


Kind of fond of a bit more warmer climate here in the states.




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: infolurker
Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

You could also get up to this point, then get rid of all the useless crap in your life and live in the trailer home.

Just another option.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: Groot

originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: Groot

OK, a few things.

Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

Now, dig a big ass hole in the ground and build an underground house.

Cover house up, hook up solar, independent water, etc.

You now have a dirt cheap house that you can turn into a mansion if you want and the tax-man and utilities know nothing.

Taxes on a trailer are almost nothing (usually a tax stamp every year of a hundred or two). Taxes on a few cheap acres are nothing (few hundred tops. I had 8 acres in the boonies and taxes were $400 a year).

Nobody will give you crap since they do not know that your main residence is even there.


That IS my plan when I retire in a few years, thing is, can I find a place to do so in like, maybe Tennessee ?



Yes, much of TN is cheap and boonies.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: daskakik

originally posted by: infolurker
Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

You could also get up to this point, then get rid of all the useless crap in your life and live in the trailer home.

Just another option.


I got rid of the useless crap. The ex, $200 grand house and all the bills. Well, except for the child support for the next year, but after that , I am debt free !




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:37 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot

I was just pointing out that if you can fit in a trailer home then you can forego everything else in that post.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 10:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: daskakik
a reply to: Groot

I was just pointing out that if you can fit in a trailer home then you can forego everything else in that post.


Well, if you want to live in a cheap trailer as a primary residence sure. When I say cheap trailer or RV, I mean cheap for low taxes.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: daskakik
a reply to: Groot

I was just pointing out that if you can fit in a trailer home then you can forego everything else in that post.


Sorry, when someone brings up useless crap, thats the first thing that pops into mind.

LOL !




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:06 PM
link   
In order to put my home on my property, I had to have utilities. I would not have been able to put in my home without an electrical hook up, a water well and a septic system, period. Concerning the electrical: I had to have the hook-up, and if I get off grid, I'd still have to be connected to the grid and by law have to sell them my surplus electricity.

However, if I happen to use less than like $35 in electricity per month, I still have to pay for the hook-up for $35 a month, even if no electricity is used. Therefore, if I should get off grid someday and I didn't want to be forced to share my electricity and not have to pay for the $30 something grid hook up fee each month, I would be forced to owe for a month or two and allow them to shut-off my electricity with their smart digital meter, then never pay them.

I'd be forced to be in debt and have bad credit to keep the electric company from buying my electricity or to have to pay them a monthly hook-up fee, while never actually using their electricity. I paid them already when I hooked up anyway, double dipping jerks wads.

They always have the laws on their side, so you would have to be an outlaw or really slick to get out of their clutches. Get a lawyer before you go off grid, that is my advice.

I'm not sure if the county or township could then declare my property condemned if I don't use the local energy service, but I'm pretty sure they could.
edit on 31-5-2017 by MichiganSwampBuck because: typo



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Groot

I just figured she kept everything that was in the house as well.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:51 PM
link   
a reply to: infolurker

I didn't mean that there was anything wrong with the rest of the post. It's just that it is a larger investment and/or more work.

I'm seeing that a single wide mobile home can have over 1,000 sq ft of floor space. That is fancy living compared to living in a van down by the river.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: Groot

OK, a few things.

Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

Now, dig a big ass hole in the ground and build an underground house.

Cover house up, hook up solar, independent water, etc.

You now have a dirt cheap house that you can turn into a mansion if you want and the tax-man and utilities know nothing.

Taxes on a trailer are almost nothing (usually a tax stamp every year of a hundred or two). Taxes on a few cheap acres are nothing (few hundred tops. I had 8 acres in the boonies and taxes were $400 a year).

Nobody will give you crap since they do not know that your main residence is even there.


Build a tiny home built into a hillside. The government doesn't really need to know how big your bunker part is. That part could be the most luxurious part of your house, make sure your chicken coop above the house on the hill has some nice windows in it and the greenhouse off to the side can be connected to the bunker by a secret passage.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:57 PM
link   
a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

What happens if you sell them enough to cover the $35 connection fee?



posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 12:32 AM
link   
a reply to: Groot

Hi Groot.
Looks like you live in a little bit of potato-paradise there eh?

Seems like it's the same in most parts of Canada, and USA.
Even tho there is plenty of free land, just planning to live there will require you set-aside $20-$40 grand just to bring-in the water/septic, electricity, earth-tests, plan approvals, permits, etc...

Can this explain why more and more people live in city condos, with absolutely no idea what to do if/when society stumbles, and there's no more food at their grocery store, and their meds are unavailable at the pharmacy?

Condos going-up everywhere we look, in every city we visit.



posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 12:47 AM
link   

originally posted by: infolurker
a reply to: Groot

OK, a few things.

Buy a piece of land with a water source out in the boonies that isn't worth that much so your taxes are almost nothing.

Build a concrete pad for a trailer home or RV.

Buy cheap trailer home and hook up water / electric that you will almost never use.

Now, dig a big ass hole in the ground and build an underground house.

Cover house up, hook up solar, independent water, etc.

You now have a dirt cheap house that you can turn into a mansion if you want and the tax-man and utilities know nothing.

Taxes on a trailer are almost nothing (usually a tax stamp every year of a hundred or two). Taxes on a few cheap acres are nothing (few hundred tops. I had 8 acres in the boonies and taxes were $400 a year).

Nobody will give you crap since they do not know that your main residence is even there.


Hi IL. Also would love to execute a plan like that, but not sure that people don't give a crap.

A friend was inquiring into a small piece of land in sale, and called the responsible municipality. (County).
He asked the receptionist about the rules, and what were the safeguards to ensure that everyone was staying within the rules. (Inspectors?)
The receptionist told him that there was a non-stop, constant flow of local community members, calling-in to complain, and stool-out their neighbors. To the point that it required a full-time clerk in the inspections/complaints dept.
Deduce from that: that the folks are policing themselves, and that it would be very difficult to do any serious unseen work.
(Yeah: that is a totally third-hand, anecdotal example. Just one example.)

Maybe out there, beyond the boonies?




top topics



 
10
<<   2 >>

log in

join