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Satellites orbiting Earth are facing grave threat

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posted on May, 31 2017 @ 07:15 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
Sounds like we need a real life version of a 1970's tv sitcom.
Quark was set on a space sanitation cruiser.... picking up space trash.


That show was pure greatness. And yeah, it looks like we need a space junk cleanup crew. Just charge one dollar per piece and the venture will pay for itself. Might even break even. How do you write government grants again?




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: firefromabove
How come satellites never crash into each other?

How come satellites are never destroyed by meteors that are allegedly entering earth very frequently?

Soo many questions...
Shhhhhhh.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 07:22 PM
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double post.
edit on 31-5-2017 by omniEther because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: trollz
We should build a gigantic solar panel with a laser attatched, in a high orbit aiming at earth to vaporize these pieces of junk.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: trollz
We should build a gigantic solar panel with a laser attatched, in a high orbit aiming at earth to vaporize these pieces of junk.


Till space junk hits it and points it at earth....



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 08:24 PM
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There's potential for private enterprise to make some money here! Get some mobile recycling platforms set up out in orbit and charge the rich with all the expendable income to "go on a space adventure!" Once they get up there, get 'em suited up and start them on trash retrieval.

I personally nominate Bieber.


Builds character!



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 08:58 PM
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3 or 4 satellites a year? First I've heard of that. That seems like an unacceptable number..I'm not sure I believe that.

Of course I COULD research it, but I'm about to fall asleep typing this...I'll rejoin thread in the morning



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 09:32 PM
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originally posted by: MarkOfTheV
No but I am questioning the head of Australia's Space Environment Research Centre, Ben Greene. He is the one who came up with the 170 million pieces of junk number.

That just sounds outrageous when Nasa.Gov says they are tracking only about 500,000.
It might sound inconsistent to the uninformed but when you learn that NASA doesn't track the smallest objects the discrepancies in count start to make sense. In fact someone at NASA said the biggest risk to space missions comes from the millions of pieces of debris they don't track. This article from NASA just says "many millions" for the total count, but nobody knows the exact count since the smallest objects can't be tracked.

www.nasa.gov...

There are more than 20,000 pieces of debris larger than a softball orbiting the Earth. They travel at speeds up to 17,500 mph, fast enough for a relatively small piece of orbital debris to damage a satellite or a spacecraft. There are 500,000 pieces of debris the size of a marble or larger. There are many millions of pieces of debris that are so small they can’t be tracked.

Even tiny paint flecks can damage a spacecraft when traveling at these velocities. In fact a number of space shuttle windows have been replaced because of damage caused by material that was analyzed and shown to be paint flecks.

“The greatest risk to space missions comes from non-trackable debris,” said Nicholas Johnson, NASA chief scientist for orbital debris.


Since each destroyed satellite can produce thousands of pieces of debris and those pieces can destroy other satellites each of which in turn can produce thousands of pieces of debris it's not hard to see how a domino effect could occur with the debris problem. Sure most of those many millions of pieces smaller than a marble aren't very big but they might be going 20 times the speed of a bullet so they can still cause damage at those speeds.


originally posted by: Antipathy17
a reply to: trollz

Could you not shotgun micro pellets into sections of space and change a lof of the debris orbit? Either pushing the debris out or even in?
No, that would just add the micro pellets to the debris problem, and possibly damage or destroy some satellites, which is what they want to avoid.

edit on 2017531 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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We need the space maid from space ball's with the giant vacuum to just clean it all up, if someone could post a pic of her that would be great.



posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 01:06 AM
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originally posted by: firefromabove
How come satellites never crash into each other?

They have

WASHINGTON - Iridium Satellite LLC confirmed today that one of its satellites was destroyed Tuesday in an unprecedented collision with a spent Russian satellite and that the incident could result in limited disruptions of service.

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How come satellites are never destroyed by meteors that are allegedly entering earth very frequently?

One actually has been

Of the roughly 8000 satellites that have been launched, which would seem to result in a veritable shooting ground for meteors, only one has ever been hit and subsequently destroyed by such a force. The European Space Agency's communications satellite, Olympus, suffered that fate in 1993. Satellites are programmed to avoid events like the Perseid showers, but that year, the Perseids shifted.

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posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 03:41 AM
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a reply to: trollz I understand now what was the reason of the darkened sky in "The Matrix". Space junk.



posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 04:37 AM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

It´s already pointing towards earth. "oh we were blasting space junk, I´m sorry we sunk your carrier fleet with that missing shot."

wrong post edited
edit on 1-6-2017 by verschickter because: (no reason given)







 
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