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Any UK members have personal experiences with Muslim no go zones?

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posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.




posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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As everyone else has said, there are none, they don't exist. Even the roughest areas plagued by gang violence would barely get a mention in the US.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky




It's a culture thing. We don't have the death penalty and we don't have an armed police force. It's a serious event when an officer is allowed to discharge their firearm and that's the way we like it.

It works for us like your culture works for you.


In the attack on the British parliament a couple months ago, where a Muslim terrorist mowed down tourists with his car, there was a police officer stabbed to death on parliament grounds. Was the idea of an armed police force debated after that attack?

I don't know if there has been a survey recently but historicaly the police themselves have been strongly against being routinely armed.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky



It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.


I guess that's the British way of answering questions.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky



It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.

I guess that's the British way of answering questions.
Yes, it's called civility and understatement.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky



It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.


I guess that's the British way of answering questions.


As opposed to what???



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope



there was a police officer stabbed to death on parliament grounds. Was the idea of an armed police force debated after that attack?

And thats my point exactly. The family of that officer would not have to be dealing with that matter if there was enough respect to give the men and women whos job it is to confront the most severe risks to the public on a daily basis. I feel like not arming the routine visible police is just disrespectful and like spitting in the face of their families.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky



It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.

I guess that's the British way of answering questions.
Yes, it's called civility and understatement.


It's also called avoiding the question and obfuscation.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

I see this brought up every couple of months and talked about in other threads. I have yet to see an actual list of these supposed "no go zones" that stands up to scrutiny.

Parts of Dover supposedly have "no go zones". Yet, when I go back down to visit friends and family, there are none. Same goes with London, Aberdeen and Newcastle.

Quite bluntly, they don't exist outside of peoples imaginations on the internet.
edit on 3152017 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: LesMisanthrope



there was a police officer stabbed to death on parliament grounds. Was the idea of an armed police force debated after that attack?

And thats my point exactly. The family of that officer would not have to be dealing with that matter if there was enough respect to give the men and women whos job it is to confront the most severe risks to the public on a daily basis. I feel like not arming the routine visible police is just disrespectful and like spitting in the face of their families.


Don't the police themselves have any say. The majority don't want to be armed.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:49 PM
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The next time I read a member raving about the no go areas of the UK then I am linking to this thread!



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:51 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: LesMisanthrope



there was a police officer stabbed to death on parliament grounds. Was the idea of an armed police force debated after that attack?

And thats my point exactly. The family of that officer would not have to be dealing with that matter if there was enough respect to give the men and women whos job it is to confront the most severe risks to the public on a daily basis. I feel like not arming the routine visible police is just disrespectful and like spitting in the face of their families.


And then there adds the risk of the weapon getting taken from said police officer and used on him/her and possibly bystanders.

Just look at the controversy in America with cops shooting innocents and their weapons being stolen and used on them.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky


It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.

I guess that's the British way of answering questions.

As opposed to what???

I've recently become acquainted with the term 'mansplain'. In a subsequent conversation with an Anishnaabe pal of mine, I used the phrase 'whitesplain', and he seemed ok with it. Now, I think we have to accept an action we might call 'Amerisplain', in which we are expected to sit back and absorb the wonders of all that which is American (whether we like it or not).
edit on 31-5-2017 by JohnnyCanuck because: ie different culture - different policing



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

If there were such places? Im in the largest Muslim center of the United States-Dearborn Michigan...and 1 or 2 things would be true.

1. Either they cant go everywhere (and they are, can and do)
2. Or I cant go anywhere they are (everywhere I drive, live, shop and visit)..yet I can and do

This is what happens when one gets their info from what they read, watch hear and talk about. Try living in an area and experiencing reality 1st.*

*There are no "No-go" zones. I dont see any isolated places and Im everywhere here from Mosques and Morgues to Arab American Museum to Henry Ford Greenfield Village, hospitals and markets.

MS
EMT
edit on 31-5-2017 by mysterioustranger because: err



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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Not a no go zone, but my Mrs absolutely will not walk up Eastgate street in Glos due to the predatory freaks that hang around and work the kebab shops up there.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: mclarenmp4
I have to say, the most intimidated I've felt in any culture in the world was in the U.S.

My friend took me downtown Detroit and that place was the worst poverty I've seen anywhere and I've been in some rough places in the world.


Good friend of mine installs cable for a company that's nationwide in the States.

Detroit is "split," into zones. Some better than others.

He was in zone four, for six weeks, by himself.

Needless to say he sent back multiple snap chats (a picture app), as well as videos.

One instance I remember was him sending a short video of him in a basement in what's referred to as a "trap house."

I'm not exaggerating when I say this. There was no furniture. No electricity. No running water. No gas. No garbage disposal. There were chairs (cinderblocks and pallets), and that was literally everything in the home. No doors, no windows, the roof was caving in.

He was shot at, nearly robbed, and was called multiple racial slurs (he's Mexican) throughout his entire stay.

Whereas the "Muslim no-go zone," is a myth, entirely fabricated, absolutely false - there actually does exist places (in the States) that no one in their right mind would visit.

But they aren't scary brown terrorists, so it's swept under the rug.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: RomeByFire

The dodgy places in most towns and cities. They're not "no go zones", but more "do you really have to go there? zones".
edit on 3152017 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky


It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.

I guess that's the British way of answering questions.

As opposed to what???

I've recently become acquainted with the term 'mansplain'. In a subsequent conversation with an Anishnaabe pal of mine, I used the phrase 'whitesplain', and he seemed ok with it. Now, I think we have to accept an action we might call 'Amerisplain', in which we are expected to sit back and absorb the wonders of all that which is American (whether we like it or not).


I'm not American.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: Kandinsky


It's always debatable and people always have the conversation after serious incidents.

I guess that's the British way of answering questions.

As opposed to what???

I've recently become acquainted with the term 'mansplain'. In a subsequent conversation with an Anishnaabe pal of mine, I used the phrase 'whitesplain', and he seemed ok with it. Now, I think we have to accept an action we might call 'Amerisplain', in which we are expected to sit back and absorb the wonders of all that which is American (whether we like it or not).


I'm not American.


Bless.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

yes. in most if not all large conurbations there are places one might avoid or be disinclined to visit. but could, without hindrance, go to if you so wished.



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