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Found this on a joke site, wow

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posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 02:35 PM
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I cant imagine having this window seat and watching this unfold:




I dont know any other details at all. I dont know the aircraft type, if it crashed or anything. Crazy pic huh?




posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 03:14 PM
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Most likely photoshopped.


jra

posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by XB70
Most likely photoshopped.


I don't know about that. I'm not saying it would be impossible, but to get it all looking right, with the right lighting and all would be damn hard to do. It looks pretty real to me. Would be interesting to find out more though, if it is indeed for real.



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 03:23 PM
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Its real. The site had a whole section dedicated to crashed airplanes. Maybe 30 pics.

One thing I am certain of, is its real.



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 04:11 PM
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yea thats one flight I would NOT want the window seat!!!!

skippytjc what website is this on?

opps DUH just noticed it on the photo


[edit on 4-2-2005 by b777pilot]



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 04:19 PM
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That reminds me of the time I didn't latch my hood down properly and it flew up as I was driving down the road.

Ouch.



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by HowardRoark
That reminds me of the time I didn't latch my hood down properly and it flew up as I was driving down the road.

Ouch.


LOL!!!



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 05:36 PM
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THere was a show on Discovery Wings a while back which had 'Reasons why aircraft crash'. They showed video footage of something like this on a 767 where the engine had been struck by a flock of seaguls while climbing to altitude, causing the engine cover to come open. Its actually not threatening at all to the aircraft, the cover is purely there for aerodynamics and its too light to cause any damage when coming off.



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 05:55 PM
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Dam that would be scary as hell. Im a little afraid of flying and if I saw that I would need a change of pants.



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by Croat56
Dam that would be scary as hell. Im a little afraid of flying and if I saw that I would need a change of pants.


You have more to worry about when sat in that particular seat such as the thouight of 15 or so heavy titanium/carbon composite blades being spun around at 70,000rpm not 3 metres from you than if the engine cover comes off. Think the thin aluminium skin of the aircraft is going to keep those blades out if the engine decides to shed one?


Seriously tho, engines are encased in kevlar skins, designed to keep blades and anything whirry that could enter the cabin within the engine incase of a blade being shed, the most that will happen is it gets ejected backward, which is safe. Anything outside this kevlar skin will only fail in a non destructive way, and thus is perfectly safe to run with the cover off.




posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 07:32 PM
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First off, those cowls are extremely heavy, and lets not forget the horizontal stab is right where that cowling is headed for. Certainly not safe. A 2 pound bird destroys those all the time, nevermind a 100 pound cowl.



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 07:34 PM
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Whats a person got to do, to get a link to where the pics are. Share the wealth.

It seems the tear would cause huge drag.

[edit on 4-2-2005 by SpittinCobra]



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 07:55 PM
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If you look at the top "bracket" thing that seems to have peeled back a bit you can see a half dozen multi colored hoses. these MUST be either fuel or hydrolics of somr sort. You can see that they have already been pulled up a bit. That piece folds back any more and one of those hoses could disconnect. This plane, assuming it landed OK, is one very lucky plane!!!



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by skippytjc
If you look at the top "bracket" thing that seems to have peeled back a bit you can see a half dozen multi colored hoses. these MUST be either fuel or hydrolics of somr sort. You can see that they have already been pulled up a bit. That piece folds back any more and one of those hoses could disconnect. This plane, assuming it landed OK, is one very lucky plane!!!


thats what I was wondering did it land safe....i know engine covers have come off and thats not major but that top bracket is the concern in that photo



posted on Feb, 4 2005 @ 11:32 PM
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Originally posted by b777pilot

Originally posted by skippytjc
If you look at the top "bracket" thing that seems to have peeled back a bit you can see a half dozen multi colored hoses. these MUST be either fuel or hydrolics of somr sort. You can see that they have already been pulled up a bit. That piece folds back any more and one of those hoses could disconnect. This plane, assuming it landed OK, is one very lucky plane!!!


thats what I was wondering did it land safe....i know engine covers have come off and thats not major but that top bracket is the concern in that photo


Okay, I will rant here a bit, but aircraft are a lot safer than people make them sound.

The whole engine could probably have fallen off and the plane would've most likely been fine. Modern jetliners are very complex machines. They are very, very, very redundant. They have to be, since they fly hard all the time, year round. Try driving your car like that, and it'll fall apart on you after a month.

There are backup systems to the backup systems to the backup systems to the backup systems on jetliners. The hydraulics, fuel pumps, avionics, electronics, even the engines are all redundant. Aircraft are very, very safe, that is the stupid media that makes out like if one thing goes wrong on an aircraft, it is bound to crash.

In the late 1970s, I believe an aircraft that was brand new, poised for mass production, was taking off with a full load of passengers and one of the engines fell off. The plane then crashed. Thus, the public panicked, the plane was crap, and it was never mass-made. The truth of the matter was really the engine fell off because the ground crew didn't attach it right (which was the airport's fault, not the aircraft manufacturer's). When the engine fell off, the plane could still have continued flying, but the engine's detaching caused something to go off in the pilot's cabin that made the pilot react in a way he should not have, thus causing the plane to crash. Had the pilot continued flying as if nothing had happened, the plane would've stayed airborn, and could have landed somewhere safely.

But no one wanted to hear it. All the news camera's showed to the uneducated public was the aircraft take off, the engine fall off, and then CRASH!! So even though this was a modern, very well-designed aircraft, since the engine fell off, it must be a deathtrap. When really it was the airport's fault and the pilot simply reacted wrong, and it was actually a testament to the aircraft's engineering that the thing could have stayed airborn with the engine literally falling off.

The media is still this way. You still here them tell of the "black box" recorder in the aircraft, when really jetliners have 20 or more of these boxes placed throughout the aircraft; there is no single "black box" that records all the data. A few weeks back, I was reading a story about a helicopter that crashed, and the journalist who wrote the article referred to the rotor on top of the helicopter as "the helicopter's propeller on top." (!?!). A helicopter's propeller, riiiight......go tell a helo pilot about how helos have big propellers on top. They have ROTORS dammit!!

The Los Angelos Times ran a four-part article on how the Harrier jet is so dangerous and they said that despite the fact of this jet having the most crashes of any jet, the Marines are pursuing after the V-22 Osprey, also a VTOL aircraft, which has also had crashes (i.e. the public should hate the Osprey, it is a dangeous aircraft, the Marines are stupid, blah blah blah).

What they fail to mention is that ALL early aircraft had crashes at their starts. The military lost god-knows how many pilots with the F-14 Tomcat in its early days. Before it had computerized flight-control systems, it was truly a hallmark of the "dangers to naval aviation," because since the engines are so far apart on the F-14, if one flames out, the aircraft goes into a spin unless you basically turn the rudder in the direction of the active engine. If an engine flames out right as you're taking off from an aircraft carrier, if you aren't careful, the F-14 could go off into the air like a frisby. F-14 pilot Cara Haltgreene (I think that's her name, I could be wrong) died from this while landing on an aircraft carrier. An engine flamed out on her and her plane went out of control. Her navigation officer (if that was the backseat guy) ejected okay, but she ejected when the plane turned upside down, thus smacking the water and dying on impact.

The Huey helicopter, made famous in Vietnam, had a problem with the main rotor (yes the main rotor, not the tail rotor) DETACHING on pilots and this problem wasn't fixed until they realized what was causing it. The AH-64 Apache had problems flying until they remedied them, and it is truly one of the greatest, if not the greatest, attack helicopter of all time. The Blackhawk helo, the workhorse helicopter of the Army, was a true Crashhawk helo, until they fixed a problem it had. Now it is truly one of the greatest helicopters of all time as well.

The V-22, as these other aircraft, also had problems. Like they now know not to take it into a certain type of dive or it can crash (and thus if you begin taking it into said dive now, a warning indicator comes on). The aircraft was grounded and they have fixed the problems since then and now it flies pretty flawless.

So I mean my point is, if you are on a modern jetliner, if black smoke starts coming from the engine, don't panick, as modern aircraft are very well taken care of and very redundant. Also, the black smoke could oftentimes not even be an engine problem, but say a hose spewing out a special liquid that really is harmless, but makes it look like there's a big problem.

If I was on an aircraft and I looked out the window and saw the outside of the engine peeling off, I'd get up, walk to a flight attendant and QUIETLY say to her, "Just in case the pilot doesn't know, the engine on the 's outside covering just peeled off."

Aircraft bodies are built pretty tough too, oftentimes to withstand shrapnel in case of a crash, so I wouldn't worry about parts of the engine flying off.

Not that I might not get a little scared, as that is only natural, but aircraft are very safe these days. I'd be more concerned about the stupid 10 year-old kid or the stupid ignorant business woman who also happens to see the engine and decides the entire cabin of people should be aware of this.



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 04:46 AM
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Hey guys,

Yeah i once saw this before and my dad is an engineer and told me what probably happened he said he's seen it before. he said that someone was probably working on it before take off and didnt secure the engine cowl and it flung off. the plane would've carsh and the cowl wouldve fallen off at take of so i suppose its all gud



posted on Feb, 9 2005 @ 04:47 AM
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Would not have* sorry



posted on Feb, 10 2005 @ 07:38 AM
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just goes to show you that when you have a handfull of nuts and bolts left at the end of building something, convincing your self that they are probably 'spare?' is not always the right train of thought?!!



posted on Feb, 14 2005 @ 04:35 AM
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WOW thats amazing!

[edit on 14-2-2005 by JimmyCarterIsSmarter]



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