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Role of Education and Learning

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posted on May, 29 2017 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: Involutionist

Brilliant video -- thank you.

There is an educational system (world wide) that does address the whole child and it is the Waldorf or Steiner School system. I was able to raise my daughter in such a school from kindergarten through high school graduation. Throughout her time there not only was there academic work to a high standard but also near daily music, art, dance, hand crafts, sport, and other subjects of important to whole child development. Many Waldorf schools have the motto: "Education from the inside out".

While you will find many critics of Waldorf education, I have seen the benefits both personal and social of these well-rounded and grounded individuals (the first school was opened in 1919). I truly believe they are well educated to meet the needs of the future - whatever that may be - because of their flexibility, curiosity and self-possession.

One of their 'prime directives', if you will, is that the students do not watch TV or videos or use technology before high school. That's the ideal - it doesn't work out for numerous reasons.

Again thank you for the video.

The arts are an important part of a well lived life.




posted on May, 29 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: Michet

Interesting...

Don't you find it hard to communicate your ideas because of your path? How do you check your work?



posted on May, 29 2017 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd



You sound much like my daughter who 'learns something new everyday' no matter what and I applaud you for it.


Thank you, my friend. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree—your daughter is reflection of your guidance and nurturing. I admire her open mind you describe.



The question I would ask is how do you find and fill in your blank spots.


I learn from others as well as I pay attention to my intuition. I find it humbling when I entertain the thought that most people I encounter in life are very smart (smarter than me) and can teach me a lot about myself and the world around me. I seek certain people out I admire and pick their brain. I also do a lot of research on my own. For instance, I learned in my first year of business that a fundamental understanding of accounting and business law was necessary. So I took an accounting course and sought out mentors who were highly respected in that field to learn even more in order to protect myself. As far as law was concerned—I delved deeply into certain aspects of business law and would pick the brain of certain lawyers who I had come to know. I also spent much time learning about how to invest money from friends who made a living in the banking sector and from fellow entrepreneurs.

I acknowledge where I'm ignorant concerning certain things I need to know and find ways to educate myself out of that ignorance. I acknowledge one cannot know it all, and therefore this inspires me to continuously seek educating myself—in my own way.



This, I have found as an adult, is the real help that formal instruction and/or education has been for me. It not only fills in the gaps but also forces me to argue my point of view to teachers that have made a subject their life's work.


I feel you. It's important for me to keep in mind that we each have our own personal life philosophies. This is why I was conscious in my first comment to state "IMO" or "I believe" a few times in order to demonstrate that what I was sharing was strictly my own personal perspective concerning the topic. My first comment was based on empirical evidence. Some people find great value and *success* through formal education—I personally do not. However, from what I have observed from those who have pursued formal education—most do not either.

I respect teachers who have made it their life work to educate and nurture others. Not everyone seeks material gains from one's work. Not all success is measured in such terms. I personally value *freedom* on my short time here on Earth and refused to spend my days as a daily commuter. My personal goal for working is to achieve freedom in order to live life according to my own terms in order to pursue my interest. That to me is success. My gf is a nurse. She finds value in what she does everyday for a living. She is successful according to her own values as well.

Again, I personally see no value in formal education unless one wants to become a daily commuting employee. That is my personal take. Some people LOVE to work and keep busy. Not me.



I, too have found from experience, that nothing is so important to self-development, then travel and exposure, immersion into other cultures - that too helps me see my blind spots and hone my arguments.


As the old saying goes: travel is the only thing in life we spend money on that makes us truly richer.

Btw, I like your vibe. You're engaging and kind with how you communicate with others here on this site. It is refreshing. I can learn a lot from you as well.

Have a great week.



posted on May, 29 2017 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

I just saw this comment of yours after replying above.



Brilliant video -- thank you.

There is an educational system (world wide) that does address the whole child and it is the Waldorf or Steiner School system. I was able to raise my daughter in such a school from kindergarten through high school graduation. Throughout her time there not only was there academic work to a high standard but also near daily music, art, dance, hand crafts, sport, and other subjects of important to whole child development. Many Waldorf schools have the motto: "Education from the inside out".

While you will find many critics of Waldorf education, I have seen the benefits both personal and social of these well-rounded and grounded individuals (the first school was opened in 1919). I truly believe they are well educated to meet the needs of the future - whatever that may be - because of their flexibility, curiosity and self-possession.

One of their 'prime directives', if you will, is that the students do not watch TV or videos or use technology before high school. That's the ideal - it doesn't work out for numerous reasons.

Again thank you for the video.



You're most welcome. I'm glad you appreciated the video of Sir Ken Robinson's TedTalk. I believe you will find many thought provoking ideas and similar ideas you hold if you delve more deeply into his work and mission. In fact, his work compliments your thread and will add much substance to the topic.



The arts are an important part of a well lived life.


I agree. However, I believe IMAGINATION is the most important aspect of well lived life. It is the MASTER KEY that opens all doors...

IMO, based on my personal life experiences and metaphysical philosophy, Ken Robinson makes the most important and key statement of his talk @18:46:

"What TED celebrates is the gift of the human imagination. We have to be careful now that we use this gift wisely and that we advert some of the scenarios we've talked about. And the only way we'll do it is by seeing our creative capacities for the richness that they are and seeing our children for the hope that they are. And or task is to educate their whole being so they can face this future."



It's very *magikal* world for those who understand. For those who do not understand—education will suffice.




 
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