It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What does the Polynesian star compass and the Horoscope have in common.

page: 2
16
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 30 2017 @ 02:09 PM
link   
a reply to: Byrd

Yes we can see Pleiades from Aotearoa New zealand, in fact we celebrate the rise of the Pleiades which we call Matariki the Maori new year which is very soon. So there nah nah nah nah nah.




posted on May, 30 2017 @ 04:54 PM
link   
a reply to: Cloudbuster


Yeh Byrd get your facts right, if you had a voyaging canoe, then everyday at a certain time of the year the Pleiades star cluster would rise at the same place on the horizon, if you set a course for it, and made course corrections every day you would be sailing a reasonably straight course to where it led you. At night the Islanders of the Marquesas could get into shallow lagoons no more than a quarter of a mile between dangerous reefs. Better than GPS, because their were no electronics to go wrong.



posted on May, 30 2017 @ 07:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: Cloudbuster
a reply to: Byrd

Yes we can see Pleiades from Aotearoa New zealand, in fact we celebrate the rise of the Pleiades which we call Matariki the Maori new year which is very soon. So there nah nah nah nah nah.


Interesting. I thought that you couldn't see the constellation of Taurus from there. I stand corrected.



posted on May, 30 2017 @ 07:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: Cloudbuster


Yeh Byrd get your facts right, if you had a voyaging canoe, then everyday at a certain time of the year the Pleiades star cluster would rise at the same place on the horizon, if you set a course for it, and made course corrections every day you would be sailing a reasonably straight course to where it led you. At night the Islanders of the Marquesas could get into shallow lagoons no more than a quarter of a mile between dangerous reefs. Better than GPS, because their were no electronics to go wrong.


Actually, the Pleaides are only visible during Janary-ish and it appears they do not really rise on the horizon but would "appear" in the north. Almost (but not quite) due north.

In addition, they're fairly faint compared to the stars of the Southern Cross.



posted on May, 30 2017 @ 07:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: punkinworks10

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: punkinworks10
a reply to: Byrd

The pleides do figure into the mythos of tribes from the west coast of NA.

A paper was published in the last couple of weeks that shows aboriginal australians and ancient greeks did share imagery im some constelations.
I'm thinkin it was on sciencedaily, ill look for it.


North America, yes. Not South Polynesia.


Yes it can be seen

The Pleiades star cluster – also known as the Seven Sisters or M45 – is visible from virtually every place that humanity inhabits Earth’s globe. It can be seen from as far north as the north pole, and farther south than the southernmost tip of South America


pleides


Besides polynesians have cultural roots in the northern hemisphere, no matter how you look at it.


So I see.



posted on May, 30 2017 @ 08:52 PM
link   
a reply to: Byrd


Lol, Byrd none of us perfect, but your closer than many.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:01 AM
link   

originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: Byrd


Lol, Byrd none of us perfect, but your closer than many.


Heh.

However, the point still stands that you can see the Pleaides only in January-ish and only in the North. They would not have been using the constellations that make up the "horoscope" for navigation.

You linked a wonderful page on how they navigated - they were paying more attention to the waves. I thought that was fascinating.



posted on May, 31 2017 @ 11:10 AM
link   
a reply to: Byrd

waves and birds for the most part




top topics



 
16
<< 1   >>

log in

join