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Mike Rowe to College Grads: ‘Don’t Follow Your Passion’

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posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:08 PM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Caver78

If he meant what you're saying, he could've just said that. But that's not what he said.

I also find it ironic that he's the one saying this, seeing as he's a rich celebrity who's had his own tv show(s), has been an opera singer, and was even a host for QVC (the channel that sells all those random products). It just reeks of hypocrisy. It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.

ETA: He's a concrete example of "monetizing your dreams", so I'd expect him to preach about that, not about the opposite.


He used a method to grab the audience's attention and pull them into the speech, kind of a reverse psychology to make the reader scratch their head and figure out what the heck he's talking about.




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:11 PM
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His point is you can't always get what you want.

People who may be less than attractrive... f it, lets call them ugly.

Ugly person goes to modeling school.
Modeling school teaches ugly person to pose and walk like a model.
Ugly person graduates from modeling school and expects to get a modeling job.
Ugly person does not get modeling job because they are ugly.

Real world has real results.




edit on 2017-05-26T23:15:11-05:002201726America/Chicago5 by c2oden because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: c2oden


I agree, if you enjoy working on small engines, like in the garden tractors. You are in luck, no one works on these. You can make a sh load of $$$ and love what you do.

On the other hand, you love singing but suck. If you follow your little dream, have fun living on peoples couches and wondering why the world is so unfair.

You can do the hobby dream thing on off hours as well. If you are good, it will become obvious when the world starts to demand more of your time than you can give. That is decision time.
edit on 26-5-2017 by seasonal because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:19 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

Yes.
That's better my than my ugly model analogy.

edit on 2017-05-26T23:24:41-05:002201726America/Chicago5 by c2oden because: better



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: c2oden

Why ask a question if you won't accept the answer? That just seems weird. But since Ramadan finally started & I'm feeling generous, I'll leave this as a small touch of "proof".

In case you don't know, those are:

1. my MCP card (Microsoft Certified Professional certificate old as dirt)
2. my A+ certification card
3. my Network + certification card
4. my ASCAP card as a publisher
5. my crescent moon chain that's also in my avy, and
6. my note of victory over you.

I needed 1, 2, and 3 for both my former server tech jobs and for my outsourcing contract. And ASCAP is something you should know or something you can google and then apologize for lol. I covered my name and ID info for obvious reasons. Now that's enough show-and-tell for now, especially since I'm starting to doubt your own words. Put up or shut up time, bro?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: c2oden

The world can be a heartless place if you do not have both feet on the ground. I have a feeling that a good percentage of these college students have not yet been acquainted with it.

It is truly disservice to tell a student they can make a good living with a liberal arts degree. Or tell your son he is good at custom fabricating if he can't use a measuring tape or run a clean weld.
edit on 27-5-2017 by seasonal because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

I'd like you better if you quit calling me bro.

I wish you happy Ramadan.
May the crecsent-shaped moon brighten your path towards enlightenment.
edit on 2017-05-26T23:46:44-05:002201726America/Chicago5 by c2oden because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

I can agree with what you're saying. I just don't think we should encourage people not to follow those passions in the first place, or to simply follow them as "hobbies". Too many people seem scared of failure. When following my dreams, I've failed more times than I can count. But I also had some amazing successes and wouldn't trade those memories for anything.

Well, there are a few that I'd trade like almost getting stuck at an airport in another country with no one I know being there & without knowing the main language. Or having an empty tank of gas while being stuck in another State with my credit card declined and no cash on me (and missing a gig in the process). Or having police raid a club while we were performing onstage; or police raid one of our 4 studios, etc.

a reply to: randomtangentsrme

If you pursue a degree that you don't care about, that implies that you were already doing it strictly for the potential job opportunities instead of for personal passions. So how would this apply to you or to your hypothetical example?

And you mention "equal standing in gaining employment", as if people can't or don't start their own businesses. I keep mentioning monetizing your dreams, which is a fancy way of saying "find ways to make money doing the things you love". There are more than a million millionaires in the US and something like 80% got that way from starting their own businesses (those are old stats now so it's probably more).

If your only idea of "making income" is to work for someone else, then who's fault is that? Ironically, I was always told that the American Dream was something completely different from working a 9 to 5 doing crap I don't care for. Hence why I keep repeating that we need to focus on teaching students how to monetize their dreams/passions.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: c2oden

As condescending as your posts have been, I shouldn't be surprised that you'd change the subject once your assumptions were proven wrong. But since I only call strangers "bro" or "bruh" when I still have a positive view towards them, I'll gladly stop calling you that.

ETA: No fair. You edited your post after I replied. Happy Ramadan/Ramadan Mubarak to you too.

edit on 26-5-2017 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-5-2017 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 12:07 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: seasonal

I can agree with what you're saying. I just don't think we should encourage people not to follow those passions in the first place, or to simply follow them as "hobbies". Too many people seem scared of failure. When following my dreams, I've failed more times than I can count. But I also had some amazing successes and wouldn't trade those memories for anything.

Well, there are a few that I'd trade like almost getting stuck at an airport in another country with no one I know being there & without knowing the main language. Or having an empty tank of gas while being stuck in another State with my credit card declined and no cash on me (and missing a gig in the process). Or having police raid a club while we were performing onstage; or police raid one of our 4 studios, etc.

a reply to: randomtangentsrme

If you pursue a degree that you don't care about, that implies that you were already doing it strictly for the potential job opportunities instead of for personal passions. So how would this apply to you or to your hypothetical example?

And you mention "equal standing in gaining employment", as if people can't or don't start their own businesses. I keep mentioning monetizing your dreams, which is a fancy way of saying "find ways to make money doing the things you love". There are more than a million millionaires in the US and something like 80% got that way from starting their own businesses (those are old stats now so it's probably more).

If your only idea of "making income" is to work for someone else, then who's fault is that? Ironically, I was always told that the American Dream was something completely different from working a 9 to 5 doing crap I don't care for. Hence why I keep repeating that we need to focus on teaching students how to monetize their dreams/passions.


You are an idealist. I appreciate that. But most individuals cannot or will not start their own business. Or the market will not allow for one to start up at this time. I've spent most of my years as an independent contractor in the arts. If that is such a successful way, why have you suggested (with your skill in music) that you have a job not related to it?

The plain and simple is there are to many people for the jobs out there. Not everyone can follow their dream, and to many people have not realized that.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

I have a college degree and an associates degree from a trade school. I honestly have to say my trade school training opened more doors for me than my college degree. I learned a hell of a lot more and the hands-on training is what local employers wanted. In fact the trade school associates degree combined with my work background as a Technical Illustrator/Graphic Designer, helped me land my career as a vocational CAD instructor. (I never used my college degree, but relied mostly on my natural drawing abilities and some of my classes I took for my Marketing and Advertising minor).

I worked with two computer instructors at our vocational high school. One instructor had a computer degree from a university, the other had a computer certification from a trade school. The trade school instructor easily ran circles around the instructor with the college degree. Every teacher at our school knew who to go to when we had computer issues. You just can't compare the advantage of hands-on experience from a trade school vs academic lecturing and book work with the occasional hands-on labs at a university.

University enrollment at 3 local colleges in my area are on the decline. Colleges and Universities everywhere are pricing themselves out of the education market with their outrageous tuition costs. Universities have simply become big business. They use a lot of student tuition money to spruce up their campuses and build classroom buildings just to attract and increase their enrollments. The high cost of maintaining buildings, facilities and attractive campuses doesn't increase the skills needed that will improve a person's chance of landing a job in their chosen field.

Universities also offer many dead-end degrees. Some of the degrees they offer aren't worth being strapped with an enormous student loan to pay back. The salaries one can expect from these degrees are even less than some of the wages earned by trades people.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

Trade school maybe the way to go for more students than may even be considering it.

It does open doors. Plus there are very few robots that can identify where the water leaking and then crawl into a sub basement and replace a leaky pipe.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:30 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: c2oden

As condescending as your posts have been, I shouldn't be surprised that you'd change the subject once your assumptions were proven wrong. But since I only call strangers "bro" or "bruh" when I still have a positive view towards them, I'll gladly stop calling you that.

ETA: No fair. You edited your post after I replied. Happy Ramadan/Ramadan Mubarak to you too.


Let me put it to you this way:

In my time teaching in the inner cities, just about every single one of my classroom students had passions for either basketball or rap.

You tell me how realistic it was for them all to pursue those passions as realistic career goals.

This is what people are trying to tell you. It is no problem at all for all of those kids to pursue either basketball or rap as hobbies, but the reality is that only a very, very few of all the kids with those passions are going to be able to make a real living with them as a primary income.

You appear to be lucky and have a passion that matches a real income potential area. Good for you and it is awesome when that happens.

The trick in life is realize when your passion is limited in its opportunities and you need to come up with a realistic backup plan that can make bacon for you while you pursue your passion on the side. No one says you have to hate the backup because you aren't passionate about it; it doesn't have to be zero-sum like that: either you are passionate or you will hate yourself and life. But you can't expect if your passion is theater, or sports, or art, or some other highly selective type discipline that you will have what it takes to make it a steady income, so you better prepare for that reality.

And you might discover that something else isn't all that bad along the way.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I also don't think doing a job you don't like is the end of the world.

I have done jobs I did not like, but in the end I was making an hourly wage so who cares.

If the world only ran when people loved what they did for a living, nothing would get done.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: ketsuko

I also don't think doing a job you don't like is the end of the world.

I have done jobs I did not like, but in the end I was making an hourly wage so who cares.

If the world only ran when people loved what they did for a living, nothing would get done.


What? You mean the guys who dredge out sewers or dump porta potties for a living don't actually have a passion for it?


Color me shocked.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 07:20 PM
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Mike rowe for president.2020.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:05 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: Caver78

Working skilled trades for most of my career, there are few that want to get into the mess and hard physical work that skilled trades can be.


Why should they? I'm a damn intern... my contract for the internship is $60/hour, 40 hours/week, unlimited PTO, an extra stipend after the internship to cover my remaining year of school. I work in an air conditioned office, have unlimited break time, on site free cafeteria, can bring my dog to work, get one of the fanciest/most comfortable office chairs around, adjustable sitting/standing desk, and great working conditions with an easy going boss.

After graduation around this time next year, should I choose to stay with the company, that jumps to $110/hour (or more, depending on negotiation), 401k matching, 8 weeks PTO per year, company car, etc...

Why on earth would I give that up to work in the trades, where I have to rely on physical labor, and my ability to earn a living is directly related to maintaining physical strength in a job that beats my body up?

The aging process is directly opposed to making a career out of trades. Your main asset is your body, which depreciates over time. On the other hand, in white collar work your main asset is your mind, which gains experience and appreciates over time.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:19 PM
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originally posted by: opethPA
I saw Mike Rowe giving the closing keynote at CIsco Live 2 years ago and he was one of the better speakers I have seen.

He was really focused on the idea that people who say "work smarter not harder" are destined to never win while those that "work harder and smarter" are the ones to succeed..

Couldnt agree more..

I can tell you that when I meet folks coming out of college at my place of employment it is amazing what they expect having not earned anything yet. I think part of that comes from the belief of "I have a specialized college degree so Im something special even though I haven't done anything yet professionally" which is sort of in line with what the OP is saying.


Here's the issue with jobs that need a college degree as a requirement to work them: You may feel special for having gotten one, but literally every person around you on your team, and every person who interviewed for your position has one too.

It's great you've gotten a degree, and across an average population sample it can be something interesting to talk about. But in specialized labor, it's a baseline for the work you want to do. You need something besides a degree in order to stand out.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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originally posted by: eManym
Has anyone watched the Dirty Jobs show and said, "Hey, I have done that." Many get tired of doing crappy jobs that no-one else wants and decide to get out of it by earning a college degree thinking they can better their situation. Some might work in their field of choice for some years but believe me if they don't get into a management role that high salary won't last long. Most Corporations use employees then discard them for the new batch of new grads that will work for the lower salaries. Then the discarded ones find they are back working that crappy job just to survive and have one added bonus, college debt.


I see it as the same up or out mentality the military has. You're given new roles, and expected to grow into them. When you stop growing, you're out of the company. You can either study and grow all career, or just go to college in the first place and get the education out of the way early. One way or another you'll have to learn.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:28 PM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I think Mike is talking about the youngsters that have grand plans and no talent to do what ever they think they are good at.

Perhaps there is a gap between reality and dreams. In society there is truths, and sure some people do have what it takes to run a record label. The market will tell you if you are good or not.


There's no such thing in life as talent. There are things you can learn.




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