It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mike Rowe to College Grads: ‘Don’t Follow Your Passion’

page: 2
13
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 26 2017 @ 08:30 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

Two sentences I know by heart...

It's the thermocouple.
Your blower motor is shot.

Think I just "dated" myself? Thought it'd give you a laugh...




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Caver78

If he meant what you're saying, he could've just said that. But that's not what he said.

I also find it ironic that he's the one saying this, seeing as he's a rich celebrity who's had his own tv show(s), has been an opera singer, and was even a host for QVC (the channel that sells all those random products). It just reeks of hypocrisy. It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.

ETA: He's a concrete example of "monetizing your dreams", so I'd expect him to preach about that, not about the opposite.
edit on 26-5-2017 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:08 PM
link   
I think people should be free to do what they want to do.

Just don't expect or demand that I pay for it.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Caver78

If he meant what you're saying, he could've just said that. But that's not what he said.

I also find it ironic that he's the one saying this, seeing as he's a rich celebrity who's had his own tv show, has been an opera singer, and was even a host for QVC (the channel that sells all those random products). It just reeks of hypocrisy. It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.


Is it hypocrisy if you use life expierence to educate others?
Or is it just ironic because you don't know what irony is?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Caver78

If he meant what you're saying, he could've just said that. But that's not what he said.

I also find it ironic that he's the one saying this, seeing as he's a rich celebrity who's had his own tv show(s), has been an opera singer, and was even a host for QVC (the channel that sells all those random products). It just reeks of hypocrisy. It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.

ETA: He's a concrete example of "monetizing your dreams", so I'd expect him to preach about that, not about the opposite.


Those of us that are able to make a living on "our dreams" when it comes to the entertainment industry recognize how rare it is. That's why we encourage others to pursue other careers besides how we make a living.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:23 PM
link   
a reply to: Caver78

Now it is vac switch and igniter.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:26 PM
link   
a reply to: randomtangentsrme

The point in both of my posts was that we should teach how to monetize our dreams. It shouldn't have to be an "either/or" situation. And ironically, your post seems to reinforce the part where I said this:


It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.

It's like a CEO encouraging people to prefer entry level jobs. Of course a CEO would say that, since it reduces the competition for his/her position. Or a seasoned politician encouraging people not to get into politics. Of course he/she would say that since it would reduce the number of potential candidates vying for his/her position.

ETA: It's not that rare to make a living in the music industry. I've spent considerable time in both Nashville & Atlanta and I know from experience that there are jobs in everything from music studios, publishing companies, cd manufacturing facilities, etc.

Just to get a legit album in stores, you typically have to go through producers, recording studios, mastering studios, graphic designers, and CD manufacturers. And if that CD is shrink wrapped and has a bar code, you then can go through either independent distributors or directly to many music stores to negotiate w/them about getting your product in their stores. Then there are the club DJ's & on-air DJ's you need to kiss up to if oyu want your music played. And then there are the club and bar owners or promoters who will get you shows; the graphic designers for flyers and/or print ads, etc.

All of those companies employ people who have dreams to be in the music biz. And I didn't even mention the stylists, managers, dancers/models, talent agencies, etc. So I'm not sure what you mean when you say that it's rare to make a living in the biz? This is why I keep stressing the "monetize your dreams" angle. There are plenty of ways to make money while still working to fulfill our dreams. It doesn't have to be an "all or nothing" approach.


edit on 26-5-2017 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-5-2017 by enlightenedservant because: formatting was abysmal



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:27 PM
link   
Has anyone watched the Dirty Jobs show and said, "Hey, I have done that." Many get tired of doing crappy jobs that no-one else wants and decide to get out of it by earning a college degree thinking they can better their situation. Some might work in their field of choice for some years but believe me if they don't get into a management role that high salary won't last long. Most Corporations use employees then discard them for the new batch of new grads that will work for the lower salaries. Then the discarded ones find they are back working that crappy job just to survive and have one added bonus, college debt.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:33 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Dreaming is ok, but it damn well better pay.

What would be cool is if alot more people got to work their dream job with great wages. This would force wages to go up for people who clean up sh and make burgers.
Correction no it wouldn't, immigration.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:37 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

That's why I say to focus on ways to monetize those dreams.



What would be cool is if alot more people got to work their dream job with great wages. This would force wages to go up for people who clean up sh and make burgers.

Do you support the "Fight for $15" minimum wage? Because that would solve the dilemma.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: randomtangentsrme

The point in both of my posts was that we should teach how to monetize our dreams. It shouldn't have to be an "either/or" situation. And ironically, your post seems to reinforce the part where I said this:


It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.

It's like a CEO encouraging people to prefer entry level jobs. Of course a CEO would say that, since it reduces the competition for his/her position. Or a seasoned politician encouraging people not to get into politics. Of course he/she would say that since it would reduce the number of potential candidates vying for his/her position.


No offense, but this makes no sense.
It does not work like this.
I don't even know where to begin...

Do you have any real world business experience?

Edit- I just saw your edit.


edit on 2017-05-26T22:47:45-05:002201726America/Chicago5 by c2oden because: edit



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:46 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant
A living wage is important, so is benefits.
I would love people to be professional nintendo players, news bloggers and summer jam DJ's? If you can make a living at it do it.
The more people that leave the traditional work force the better it is for people who can hack the traditional crap fest.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:48 PM
link   
a reply to: c2oden

Let's see... On one end of the spectrum, I've been an entrepreneur, got my first business license when I was 18, and ran my own record label until I was in my mid 20s. And on the other end of the spectrum, I've been employed in the corporate world, have been everything from a temporary worker to a server technician to a supervisor, and have being blessed enough to work overseas on an outsourcing contract.

Do those count, bro?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: c2oden

Let's see... On one end of the spectrum, I've been an entrepreneur, got my first business license when I was 18, and ran my own record label until I was in my mid 20s. And on the other end of the spectrum, I've been employed in the corporate world, have been everything from a temporary worker to a server technician to a supervisor, and have being blessed enough to work overseas on an outsourcing contract.

Do those count, bro?


No. Because you do not seem to have a basic understanding of how things work.

I'm sorry, but I don't believe you.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: randomtangentsrme

The point in both of my posts was that we should teach how to monetize our dreams. It shouldn't have to be an "either/or" situation. And ironically, your post seems to reinforce the part where I said this:


It reminds me of the people who "warn" kids not to try something simply so they can keep that thing to themselves.

It's like a CEO encouraging people to prefer entry level jobs. Of course a CEO would say that, since it reduces the competition for his/her position. Or a seasoned politician encouraging people not to get into politics. Of course he/she would say that since it would reduce the number of potential candidates vying for his/her position.

ETA: It's not that rare to make a living in the music industry. I've spent considerable time in both Nashville & Atlanta and I know from experience that there are jobs in everything from music studios, publishing companies, cd manufacturing facilities, etc.

Just to get a legit album in stores, you typically have to go through producers, recording studios, mastering studios, graphic designers, and CD manufacturers. And if that CD is shrink wrapped and has a bar code, you then can go through either independent distributors or directly to many music stores to negotiate w/them about getting your product in their stores. Then there are the club DJ's & on-air DJ's you need to kiss up to if oyu want your music played. And then there are the club and bar owners or promoters who will get you shows; the graphic designers for flyers and/or print ads, etc.

All of those companies employ people who have dreams to be in the music biz. And I didn't even mention the stylists, managers, dancers/models, talent agencies, etc. So I'm not sure what you mean when you say that it's rare to make a living in the biz? This is why I keep stressing the "monetize your dreams" angle. There are plenty of ways to make money while still working to fulfill our dreams. It doesn't have to be an "all or nothing" approach.



Yes all the companies do. But it still is a fraction of those with degrees in music, or other related trades.
Its interesting you make the post you do but will not agree with what I stated.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:59 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

Then what's the problem??? College isn't for everyone, but neither is trade work. Construction isn't for everyone, but neither is boxing, teaching, fishing (professional fishing), graphic design, etc. Every single profession on the planet has some people that love what they do; as in, every single profession on the planet has some people are fulfilling their dreams by following that career path.

I just don't see the logic in encouraging graduates to not follow their passions. I think one reason so many agencies and organizations suck is simply because some of their workers don't like their jobs. What good is a veterinarian that hates animals but is only doing it to pay the bills? It would make much more sense for someone who loves being around animals to be steered towards being a veterinarian. And wouldn't it be better for someone who likes working with kids to work at a daycare center than to have someone who hates kids do it?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: c2oden

Let's see... On one end of the spectrum, I've been an entrepreneur, got my first business license when I was 18, and ran my own record label until I was in my mid 20s. And on the other end of the spectrum, I've been employed in the corporate world, have been everything from a temporary worker to a server technician to a supervisor, and have being blessed enough to work overseas on an outsourcing contract.

Do those count, bro?


Those count for you. You are not everyone.
Your post shows that sometimes you need to work outside of you chosen vocation. Right now the recent college grads I interact with are not willing to do so.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:01 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I think Mike is talking about the youngsters that have grand plans and no talent to do what ever they think they are good at.

Perhaps there is a gap between reality and dreams. In society there is truths, and sure some people do have what it takes to run a record label. The market will tell you if you are good or not.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: seasonal

Then what's the problem??? College isn't for everyone, but neither is trade work. Construction isn't for everyone, but neither is boxing, teaching, fishing (professional fishing), graphic design, etc. Every single profession on the planet has some people that love what they do; as in, every single profession on the planet has some people are fulfilling their dreams by following that career path.

I just don't see the logic in encouraging graduates to not follow their passions. I think one reason so many agencies and organizations suck is simply because some of their workers don't like their jobs. What good is a veterinarian that hates animals but is only doing it to pay the bills? It would make much more sense for someone who loves being around animals to be steered towards being a veterinarian. And wouldn't it be better for someone who likes working with kids to work at a daycare center than to have someone who hates kids do it?


It seems you are under the delusion that every graduate is passionate about their degrees, or that every degree has an equal standing in gaining employment?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:06 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Lets take your day care center job.

Of course it would be best for someone who loves kids to work a day care. There is only $$ in owning the day care center. Workers get paid beans.

Vet
If you love animals you had better #1 have the $$$$ for college and #2 be an excellent student. Love of a dream or your bliss does NOT = a productive career.

In theory I 100% agree with you. But in practice it falls short. The world has a way of pushing people into directions that make us compromise.
edit on 26-5-2017 by seasonal because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
13
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join