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Journalism, PR, and Narrative Creation

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posted on May, 26 2017 @ 01:10 PM
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My niece just graduated from college with a BA in Journalism. Only problem is, she didn't study journalism or really take any journalism classes. She was focused on and took classes primarily in public relations (PR). We actually argued about the clear differences between journalism and PR, but apparently the university doesn't see any in the two. As I recently learned even the "art" college I attended and have spoken at in the recent past merged their journalism and PR courses as well.

To me, these are opposite ends of the spectrum. PR and journalism should be competing against each other, not working hand-in-hand. And if other institutions of "higher learning" are also combining the subject matter and teaching them not just as equals, but as the same thing, what's that say about the level of reporting we as citizens/consumers are currently getting and going to get in the near future?

Having worked in the professional media world, I could go on a lengthy rant about what I experienced--both in what I was expected to produce and how certain subjects were basically considered "taboo" by editors--but I'm sure most of you here at ATS don't need examples of how the media controls and manipulates stories. But what I fear is that this merger of PR and journalism (which I don't think is new, but has never been as blatant) will drive the narrative of every "news" story we see/hear/read. And in fact, the lines may become so blurred that figuring out what is news and what is PR-made "news" will be impossible.

While I'm sure most of you will respond by destroying the main-stream media, the so-called "alternative" media isn't much better in these regards. It seems like the "agenda" of a piece is more important than what the actual news/facts of the matter is. And I'm wondering if this situation has been created and is now driven by the influx of PR--something that I know "old school" teachers and newspeople worry about--yet is seemingly becoming the norm.

So what say you, ATS? And how can this tide be turned, if at all?




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: MrParanoid

agree that journalist and PR opposite. a journalist's job is to counter and work through PR.

PR works for company or entity (candidate, cause)

explain to her that Joe Public doesn't have time to research everything and everyone they hear, and its the reporters job to filter the spin and bs and doubletalk so Joe Public will be correctly informed, not propagandized.

hopefully she'll realize she's supposed to question politicians etc, not be a transcript service for.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: MrParanoid

Overton window?

en.wikipedia.org...



Taking it further.

There are rooms full of spooks who make up the news. It's a fairly junior job, you can go further, then when you're considered too much of a risk you're sent on a mission from which you don't return.

The editor of a local brainwashing rag once leapt out of his chair and shouted when he heard my name. Now his rag gets put through my door every week although we've never asked or paid for it. Makes you wonder.

Spooks teach journalism.

Take this half-wit for example.
drdavidclarke.co.uk...

I specialise in teaching media law and investigation skills.


He couldn't investigate his way out of a wet paper bag.

drdavidclarke.co.uk...

Perhaps next time the police receive a sighting of a ‘mystery big cat’ prowling the suburbs of a city or town they might consult a folklorist or a psychologist first before they call out the marksmen or scramble helicopters.


Folklorist or psychologist? The implications are obvious.

It's all mind control.

The most informative video linking Clarke to other cover-up merchants seems to have been removed. Shame.


They teach trash journalism then the most willing students get the best jobs.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: ElGoobero

The weird thing is she does understand the difference. I see that when she talks about what she wants to do job-wise. She has zero interest in actual journalism. Yet, in the same instance, she talks about working somewhere within the media. So, it's like the difference between the two is merely delineated by a job description rather than by a mindset or a principle. I think that has a lot to do with her schooling and teachers which means the merging of the two is intentional and has a greater purpose down the line.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: MrParanoid

They teach trash journalism then the most willing students get the best jobs.



I agree. Those most brainwashed and/or accepting will go the furthest. Question the status quo, and you get the hook. That is frightening because then PR no longer is "PR" but now the "news" without question or commentary.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: MrParanoid

Public Relations of the art of screwing the American people:



This video is really good showing the advanced PR techniques used by the Pentagon:

Psywar



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: MrParanoid

I think that you're absolutely right about PR being wholly opposite to journalism. In many case, PR is used to satiate, sometimes by watering down or otherwise discarding the truth. Journalism is meant to inform, no matter whether that information hurts or feels good.

So as not to inhibit someone's free speech and right to say what they please, one thing I practice is to hold the outlet to its own standards. Usually their ethical guidelines are available, and they can be cross-referenced to their materials. If they hold to their standards, even if those standards stipulate lying or satire or misinformation, they are essentially being honest.



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