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Live LENR reactor test

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posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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Looks like Martin Fleischmann Memorial Project guys have got access to a reactor from an independent researcher.

The unit is claimed to have an output of over 10kW. The input is said to be single phase 230V, so about 3kW max.

You can follow the test live here:
www.lenr-forum.com...

It seems that they are also live streaming on youtube.

I don't really have the time to watch it myself, but will be checking for updates.




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: moebius

LENR demo from NIWEEK 2012! Holy moly time flies!




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Yeah... there is a german proverb which is quite fitting I think, "Hope is the last to die"




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: moebius

I don't understand what is going on

The live video is just a guy swirling a stick in a bucket of water with some science stuff scattered about the table ?




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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So the first test run failed. The claim seems to be that the water pump pushed to much water through the system inhibiting the reaction.

They will continue tomorrow. Although I am not expecting much.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: moebius

I don't understand what is going on

The live video is just a guy swirling a stick in a bucket of water with some science stuff scattered about the table ?



I did not watch the stream. From my understanding they have an input water bucket at some temperature and an outlet bucket they sparge steam(or hot water) into, measuring mass and temperature over time.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 05:08 PM
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Looks jimmy rigged.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: moebius

Yes but what are they trying to achieve ?

I'm no scientist but I would have thought it you were trying to make cold fusion viable, it would take more than steam and a few buckets of water ?

That isn't meant to be sarcastic I'm genuinely curious as to what this experiment is supposed to be



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 07:11 PM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: moebius

Yes but what are they trying to achieve ?



A COP greater than 1.



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Which means ?



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: Discotech
I wouldn't explain it that way, I'd explain it this way.

LENR experiments are typically looking for "anomalous heat production" not explained by other known sources such as chemical reactions, which would then lead researchers to suspect it's instead a "Low Energy Nuclear Reaction" or something else unknown, which can be exploited for energy production.

The experimental method is known as "calorimetry" which involves accounting for all your heat sources and heat losses and looking at expected input versus expected output. Let's say you take a D-cell battery and short out the terminals, it will start heating up. If you submerge the battery in water you can measure the exact temperature rise in the given amount of water which tells you the calories of heat given off by the battery (hence the name calorimetry).

What LENR researchers hope to see is a heat output that's far greater than what could be explained by such a battery reaction or other chemical reaction, but in such experiments it's notoriously difficult to control all the variables to get exact results, which was a problem with the original "cold fusion" experiments, so the scientific community's reaction to anomalous results is to consider them dubious until replicated carefully in another lab and many such results have not been repeatable.

Of course there's also a difference between running a small calorimetry experiment and commercial energy production.

edit on 2017526 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 10:37 AM
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Looks like the second test run has just started.

Live data plot:
plot.ly...

So far not much to see, as the data is all over the place.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 10:45 AM
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originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: moebius

Yes but what are they trying to achieve ?

I'm no scientist but I would have thought it you were trying to make cold fusion viable, it would take more than steam and a few buckets of water ?

That isn't meant to be sarcastic I'm genuinely curious as to what this experiment is supposed to be


The water bucket business is a simple and robust method to test whether the device produces energy as claimed.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 01:37 PM
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The test was unsuccessful today too. Looks like they'll give the guy who built the device until Monday to get it working, will try another test run then.

Sadly this seems to be quite typical for LENR claims. The inventor claims to have seen excess energy, but any independent testing/replication fails to reproduce it.



posted on May, 29 2017 @ 10:29 AM
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The third test round has begun a short time ago. Nothing interesting so far according to the data plot, pulsed input power and lagging output response. At least the test setup seems to be working.



posted on May, 29 2017 @ 02:58 PM
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And the test is over. They've measured a solid COP of 1.

Still, it is great that the test happened. I wish more LENR researchers would allow independent testing.




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