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Planned Parenthood executives joke about decapitating fetuses in new video

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posted on May, 26 2017 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: seasonal


Science doesn't worry about news cycle attention spans. These tests/experiments/studies takes years and years and years to do, to put it in simple terms. They don't always work out, so, sometimes we have to back and start all over again at step one.

Science take patience and tenacity.



edit on 26-5-2017 by windword because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 26 2017 @ 07:52 PM
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www.explorestemcells.co.uk...

this article was dated more recently, like....yesterday...
there seems to a few advantages to using fetal stem cells..
and it's not like outlawing fetal stem cell research is gonna reduce the numbers of abortions!!
it's more like banning it would remove a resource that has a pretty large potential from not only medical research but also many current acceptable medical practices that are in use today, and have been for many years.
like vaccine production. which I ain't sure that adult stem cells would be an adequate substitution since they don't multiply as well in a laboratory environment.
and, I am sure that if you are ever bit by a rapid dog, you would prefer that they have a supply of the vaccine ready to treat you with!!



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 11:01 PM
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originally posted by: dawnstar
www.explorestemcells.co.uk...

this article was dated more recently, like....yesterday...
there seems to a few advantages to using fetal stem cells..
and it's not like outlawing fetal stem cell research is gonna reduce the numbers of abortions!!
it's more like banning it would remove a resource that has a pretty large potential from not only medical research but also many current acceptable medical practices that are in use today, and have been for many years.
like vaccine production. which I ain't sure that adult stem cells would be an adequate substitution since they don't multiply as well in a laboratory environment.
and, I am sure that if you are ever bit by a rapid dog, you would prefer that they have a supply of the vaccine ready to treat you with!!




I'm impressed that they mentioned the need for immunosuppressants. That alone should tell people embryonic stem is not worth the effort. Nothing like having an electively suppressed ability to fend off a nasty cold, or worrying about cutting yourself and getting an infection.

They did forget to mention that embryonic stem cells have this nasty habit of continually dividing, like a cancer cell. That's because cancer cells have the same active growth genes as an embryo, not the other way around. Human babies growing from a single cell to a 7 - 10 lb organism in 9 months. That amount of growth and cellular division is unprecedented at any other point in our lives. Lucky for us, between the mother's hormones and the baby's these genes are shut off in the last weeks of the final trimester.

Quick quiz, guess what an embryonic stem cell does not have access to?

Answer: the correct hormone cocktail needed to tell the culture to slow down most cell division.

I can see the benefit of using embryonic cells for vaccines like Rubella, because most viruses and some bacteria are so specialized they will not grow in any other culture.

Conversely, our knowledge of genetics has risen to the point that vaccines can be created using non-pathogenic viruses and bacteria that have been genetically engineered to express the epitopes of real pathogens, minus the risk of actually expanding the true infectious material to hazardous levels. For example, if we could determine the markers on the Rubella virus that our immune systems normally keys on, we could generate a bacteria used in pro-biotic therapy (like a Lactobacillus) that expresses those Rubella markers and prepare the immune system minus the propagation of Rubella in the lab and chance of not adequately inactivating the infectious virus.
edit on 26-5-2017 by Teikiatsu because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Teikiatsu
seems to me that the great takeaway from the article I linked to was there are advantages and disadvantages in both cases and adult stem cells might be the best choice for some applications while not being a choice for others, while the same could be said of fetal stem cells.




Vaccines Developed Using Human Cell Strains

The first licensed vaccine made with the use of a human cell strain was the rubella vaccine developed by Stanley Plotkin, MD, at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia.

In 1941, Australian ophthalmologist Norman Gregg first realized that congenital cataracts in babies were the result of their mothers being infected with rubella during pregnancy. Along with cataracts, it was eventually determined that congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) could also cause deafness, heart disease, encephalitis, mental retardation, and pneumonia, among many other conditions. At the height of a rubella epidemic that began in Europe and spread to the United States in the mid-1960s, Plotkin calculated that 1% of all births at Philadelphia General Hospital were affected by congenital rubella syndrome. In some cases, women who were infected with rubella while pregnant terminated their pregnancies due to the serious risks from CRS.

Following one such abortion, the fetus was sent to Plotkin at the laboratory he had devoted to rubella research. Testing the kidney of the fetus, Plotkin found and isolated the rubella virus. Separately, Leonard Hayflick (also working at the Wistar Institute at that time) developed a cell strain using lung cells from an aborted fetus. Many viruses, including rubella, grew well in the resulting cell strain, and it proved to be free of contaminants and safe to use for human vaccines. The strain was called WI-38.

Plotkin grew the rubella virus he had isolated in WI-38 cells kept at 86°F (30°C), so that it eventually grew very poorly at normal body temperature. (He chose the low temperature approach following previous experiences with attenuating poliovirus.) After the virus had been grown through the cells 25 times at the lower temperature, it was no longer able to replicate enough to cause illness in a living person, but was still able to provoke a protective immune response. The rubella vaccine developed with WI-38 is still used in the United States today as part of the combined MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine.

www.historyofvaccines.org...


and yet...
one aborted fetus has provided cells that have been replicating for around 50 years that are used in rubella vacinations...


for some reason, I think using this strain we already have would be more cost effective???



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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I was using the Rubella as a like-for-like example of how current technology could avoid the use of embryonic stem cells *AND* make propagating the vaccine safer for the production site. I could just as easily have said Ebola, Zika, Hantavirus, Marburg, etc.



posted on May, 28 2017 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: dawnstar
a reply to: namelesss

ya, now we don't even get to hear the highly edited version of the recording, we just have to take their word for it....

can't help but wonder, did they bring up this dead horse because legislation is in the senate that calls for taking planned parenthood out of the options available for medicaid patients (what they term as defunding) , or is the trial against daleiden and friend about to begin...



Always suspect ulterior motives from the unethical, unLoving...!
"Follow the money trail..."! *__-




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