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VLA reveals new object near supermassive black hole in famous galaxy

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posted on May, 23 2017 @ 03:29 PM
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VLA images of Cygnus A from 2015 and 2016


Credit: Perley, et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, NASA


The scientists then observed Cygnus A with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) in November of 2016, clearly detecting the new object.

...

What is the new object? Based on its characteristics, the astronomers concluded it must be either a supernova explosion or an outburst from a second supermassive black hole near the galaxy's center. While they want to watch the object's future behavior to make sure, they pointed out that the object has remained too bright for too long to be consistent with any known type of supernova.

...

While the new object definitely is separate from Cygnus A's central supermassive black hole, by about 1500 light-years, it has many of the characteristics of a supermassive black hole that is rapidly feeding on surrounding material.

phys.org, May 23, 2017 - VLA reveals new object near supermassive black hole in famous galaxy.

While we patiently wait for the data to be sent out from Antarctica so we can see Event Horizon's capture, here is some news from the VLA. There are several ground based radio interferometers (radio telescopes), that can be linked creating a virtual larger aperture (Wikipedia: VLBA). The Karl G. Jansky VLA went through an upgrade from 1970's tech to more modern in 2011. It went back operational at the end of March, 2012. Being hooked up to the VLBA it is providing some awesome results! This is one.

They pointed it back at Cygnus A and found something new. It is the orange flash in the picture. Something flared up and they do not believe it was a typical nova so they are betting a second supermassive black hole is out there from a galaxy collision and merger. The picture they have is of the second one probably snacking on a star!

The size of these things are hard to imagine. The terms, "light hours" (for the supermassive ones, "light days"!!) are used as a measurement of size (it is the time light takes to travel in the given unit). What looks like a little flash is well... astronomical!

Had to share!




posted on May, 23 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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That's awesome! So are we SEEING a black hole ..? The orange burst?



posted on May, 23 2017 @ 03:48 PM
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Awesome thank you for sharing this...

I will freely admit my head will start hurting if I try to do much more than read the watered down article.




posted on May, 23 2017 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: JakeR777

The big orange dot in the center is the known supermassive black hole. They suspect the animated flare up is a second black hole circling the first one and eating a star.

These images are radio waves. What energy we can "see" when looking in that part of the spectrum. Then reconstructed for our viewing pleasure as visible light.

The rest is theory and surprises!



 


a reply to: Irishhaf

The sizes are really hard to wrap your mind around! The big orange dot is 1,500 light years away. They spent a couple months observing that small patch of space. I had/have trouble getting my mind around some of this too! So don't feel too bad!



edit on 23-5-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: tag on reply

edit on 23-5-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: clarity

edit on 23-5-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: emoticon



posted on May, 25 2017 @ 05:46 PM
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More black hole news!


Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants of the vanquished star, only to find that it disappeared out of sight.
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The star, which was 25 times as massive as our sun, should have exploded in a very bright supernova. Instead, it fizzled out—and then left behind a black hole.

"Massive fails" like this one in a nearby galaxy could explain why astronomers rarely see supernovae from the most massive stars...

phys.org, May 25, 2017 - Collapsing star gives birth to a black hole.

I always thought it was only by supernova but have just learned of "massive fail" where a star fails to explode. I think they were watching the star to watch it go nova but it went dark instead (and you can't see anything there).

Who knew?
edit on 25-5-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: grammar and clarity



posted on May, 25 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
More black hole news!


Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants of the vanquished star, only to find that it disappeared out of sight.
...

The star, which was 25 times as massive as our sun, should have exploded in a very bright supernova. Instead, it fizzled out—and then left behind a black hole.

"Massive fails" like this one in a nearby galaxy could explain why astronomers rarely see supernovae from the most massive stars...

phys.org, May 25, 2017 - Collapsing star gives birth to a black hole.

I always thought it was only by supernova but have just learned of "massive fail" where a star fails to explode. I think they were watching the star to watch it go nova but it went dark instead (and you can't see anything there).

Who knew?

Never heard of sucha thing. By definition, a massive star collapsing into a black hole should produce a massive and very bright explosion (aka the supernova).

Will have to read up on this more...



posted on May, 26 2017 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Black holes are strange.

They're like quantum things in the macro world. Spinning, light can't escape, twisting the fabric of space-time itself, light hours wide even light days wide... mind boggling really! I find them fascinating.




posted on May, 28 2017 @ 03:26 AM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
More black hole news!


Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants of the vanquished star, only to find that it disappeared out of sight.
...

The star, which was 25 times as massive as our sun, should have exploded in a very bright supernova. Instead, it fizzled out—and then left behind a black hole.

"Massive fails" like this one in a nearby galaxy could explain why astronomers rarely see supernovae from the most massive stars...

phys.org, May 25, 2017 - Collapsing star gives birth to a black hole.

I always thought it was only by supernova but have just learned of "massive fail" where a star fails to explode. I think they were watching the star to watch it go nova but it went dark instead (and you can't see anything there).

Who knew?

I've had a look at various all-sky surveys at different wavelengths over at skyview.gsfc.nasa.gov... , and that star already appears to be gone in those images.

DSS (visible light):


WISE (near-infrared):


2MASS (near-infreared):


Permalink to Sky-Map.org

I hope the James Webb telescope will be pointed at that location soon after it becomes functional, we might see some remnants of this event, and perhaps even the black hole itself.
edit on 28-5-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2017 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

JWST is going to blow people's minds!!

There are going to be rethinks of even fundamental ideas. And space is going to be found to be way different than we thought.

Heck, Tabby's star is just the beginning.




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