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The first world war 7000 years ago?

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posted on Jul, 23 2018 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: Abysha




our demise will happen at a time in our societal evolution where our records are a bit more specific


and what if only a few hundred years ago another event buried our true past?

Mud flood, dirt rain, and the story of the buried buildings
www.stolenhistory.org...




posted on Jul, 24 2018 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

the utter lack of any logic on that site is amazing



posted on Jul, 24 2018 @ 05:39 PM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

the utter lack of any logic on that site is amazing


You've been here 14 years and a month and you are still experiencing amazement at what is posted here?

Well done then. Many people have their brains reduced to soggy pudding well before this.

Flee



posted on Jul, 24 2018 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune




Well done then. Many people have their brains reduced to soggy pudding well before this. Flee


oh shucks - look "circle jerking" adding to the discussion




posted on Jul, 24 2018 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

If you say so


what ever happened to ............ Codex Alimentarius ? [ teh conspiracy ]
www.abovetopsecret.com...

I noticed you like to start threads and run - didn't get the responses you were looking for?



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 01:59 AM
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Brien Forrester has a series of studies on megalithic cataclysm...





I'll be back.



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

Foerster has no studies.
Foerster has bogus claims that are meant to drum up customers for his tour company.

Harte



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 05:56 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
a reply to: FlyingFox

Foerster has no studies.
Foerster has bogus claims that are meant to drum up customers for his tour company.

Harte


Yep,

FlyingFox a suggestion look at the first Video. Do you hear him making claims about why the excavation area around Tanis has no plants? Why don't you research that claim. Use Google Earth, look at where Tanis is, the climate and rainfall - let us know what you find out. Is there a plausible and probable cause for the ground not being green OTHER than a sun storm?



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 06:04 PM
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Errr...
A Moonstorm?

Harte



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 06:24 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
Errr...
A Moonstorm?

Harte


Moon storm?

Have you been ghost writing scripts for Brien again? We talked about this before, don't make me send you to the garage for a time out.



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 07:25 PM
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originally posted by: FlyingFox
Brien Forrester has a series of studies on megalithic cataclysm...



I'll be back.


Okay... so looking at the video...

The first thing he does is give you a wrong impression by using tightly focused camera angles. The whole site is around 1/2 mile long and perhaps 1/4 mile wide (it's pretty small) and on a hill and is an archaeological site. It's in the delta and everything around it is lush and green as you can see on Google maps.

He says something about getting the granite there, and failing to mention that everything around it would have been underwater in the yearly Nile floods... so all they had to do was float the rock downstream and dock up to the docks on the hill where the site is. But he doesn't show you that.

Then he talks about the erosion... but this is the rainy area of Egypt and is frequently flooded. Erosion is no surprise. He mentions the fallen blocks without saying that the area is prone to earthquakes. He mentions the relatively pristine sarcophagus without saying that it was found in a tomb and was not exposed to the elements.

The dolly view shows you the city (which hides the greenery of the area) and is staged so you see down its length (making it look like a lot of desert around) and not the green fields behind him. Notice that all the camera angles are low.

If you look at statues that have been hit by explosives, they're not in as good condition as these. This is earthquake damage and (sometimes) Christian attempts to destroy pagan things.

Stone hit by 2000 degrees C would have melted. That's above the melting point of granite. That statue wasn't melted.

There is no evidence that the obelisks are "megaliths" or that they were constructed in predynastic times. And in spite of his insistence, there's plenty of statues (including small ones) that show that the Egyptians could work Aswan granite well and had been working it for thousands of years. By the way, it's harder to carve delicate hieroglyphs in granite than it is to shape a large statue.

...etc

So by using the right camera angles and not giving you history and geology (the Nile floods, the boat docks, etc, etc) he's building a false impression.



posted on Jul, 25 2018 @ 09:19 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

Howdy Byrd

Great answer. I answered a similar question a few days ago. This is a Google Earth image of the Tanis area.



One small correction the rain fall in the Delta is slight

Only 100–200 mm (4–8 in) of rain falls on the delta area during an average year, and most of this falls in the winter months.

Versus an average in the US of 30 inches.

I traveled in the Delta in '83, 95 and 2003 and without irrigation all you had was desert scrub and some tamarisk trees.
edit on 25/7/18 by Hanslune because: Added comment



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: Hanslune
a reply to: Byrd

Howdy Byrd

Great answer. I answered a similar question a few days ago. This is a Google Earth image of the Tanis area.



One small correction the rain fall in the Delta is slight

Only 100–200 mm (4–8 in) of rain falls on the delta area during an average year, and most of this falls in the winter months.

Versus an average in the US of 30 inches.

I traveled in the Delta in '83, 95 and 2003 and without irrigation all you had was desert scrub and some tamarisk trees.


Thanks. Same was true of the area in 2016 - I suspect the lack of Nile flooding had to do with desert scrubbiness of un-irrigated areas. On the one hand it prevents human disaster, but it wrought havoc on some natural systems.



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 01:11 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Hanslune
a reply to: Byrd

Thanks. Same was true of the area in 2016 - I suspect the lack of Nile flooding had to do with desert scrubbiness of un-irrigated areas. On the one hand it prevents human disaster, but it wrought havoc on some natural systems.


Yep the poor fellahin were having to borrow money to buy fertilizer. That and dig tunnels down dozens of feet to try and find stuff to loot.



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 01:25 AM
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At the end of the day we are still talking about working raw stone no matter how great it is... Think about it.



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 01:51 AM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero
At the end of the day we are still talking about working raw stone no matter how great it is... Think about it.


Think about it. Okay good idea....

Lets see mankind had been working with stone for about 2.6 million years. I would suspect that they had become rather good at it. They also would have developed a good sense of what kinds of properties stone had - which were good for making stone tools, the type of stone tool needed and the methods to work it.

Adults passed there skills to the their children in a long chain of about 130,000 generations.

Their stone tools were a bit crude initially starting with the Oldowan, Acheulean, Mousterian, the Aurignacian and finally to finest quality the Microlithic and neolithic industry.

One might say by when they started to replace wood and mud brick in construction that they had become experts in many aspects of stone working.



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 07:00 AM
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originally posted by: Hanslune

Their stone tools were a bit crude initially starting with the Oldowan, Acheulean, Mousterian, the Aurignacian and finally to finest quality the Microlithic and neolithic industry.

Of these, I find the Mousterian to be the most interesting by far.
It's fascinating that ancient mice developed stone tools.

Harte
edit on 7/26/2018 by Harte because: of the wonderful things he does!



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Hanslune

Their stone tools were a bit crude initially starting with the Oldowan, Acheulean, Mousterian, the Aurignacian and finally to finest quality the Microlithic and neolithic industry.

Of these, I find the Mousterian to be the most interesting by far.
It's fascinating that ancient mice developed stone tools.

Harte


Well they had to due to necessity. They had to fight off hordes of cat clans, mole men and the dreaded cheese eating zombies.



posted on Jul, 26 2018 @ 11:09 PM
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www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com/user/brienfoerster/videos



He demonstrates successive building and rebuilding construction cycles.

A good number of other sites around the world show a similar "cataclysm", like in Tannis and Baalbek.



He even has a Gozer video.



I try not to take it too seriously, it's just youtube videos.

en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramid_of_Djoser

You get what you pay for.




edit on 26-7-2018 by FlyingFox because: freedom



posted on Jul, 27 2018 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

Ah so you just treat Brien's videos as adult cartoons, ridiculous material with no scientific validity but good for 'grins and giggle' type of entertainment then.

Will leave you then to pretend.



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