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Oregon Officials Threaten To Seize 2,000 Acre Organic Farm, Spray It With Roundup

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posted on May, 19 2017 @ 06:47 PM
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Pretty good article. Roundup seems to actually be used for it's ability as a miticide, particularly in this case as a funguside. Dangerous fungus can grow on grains, the bleaching and bromating took care of those and the micotoxins the fungus created that are bad for people. Glyphosate is not classified as a miticide but it is actually a very powerful miticide. but for people who cannot detox this chemistry it can cause lots of problems. I did some extensive research on this chemical. I do not agree with them using it preharvest. Germany outlawed it preharvest after a couple of years because it was causing sickness. They actually found that it did not hurt their food supply to ban it for preharvest, some farmers were scared they were going to have problems, convinced by Monsanto that they would lose profits. It never happened. It was another of Monsanto's deceptions to increase sales of their product.

In my genetics I was flagged for problems with some pesticides, glyphosate, and triclosan. These are the only ones that were researched, organophosphate chemistry that I can not detox very well. I can't get information on the herbicides used on potatoes and a lot of other veggies as related to genetic risk, they have not been tested as to genetic risk yet.

I grew up on the farm in the summer, we moved in town for the winter. I was with my dad working in the fields. I didn't care much for planting strawberries, that damn planter fingers kept grabbing my fingers when I put the plant into it for planting. I was a rich kid compared to other kids. My sister and I split the self picking strawberry field sales, fifteen cents a quart, plus I got extra for picking berries to sell to the association. that was seven cents a quart. That was quite a bit back in the sixties, and I also had contracts with a couple of businesses to clean their offices. so I made way more than any other kids my age. I would pull in about three hundred bucks in the summer from working on the farm in the sixties plus my cleaning jobs money. I have a problem with society today saying kids don't need to work at all if they do not want to. By the time I was seventeen I had a new boat, my own gun, and a motorcycle I bought myself with my own money. I also had lots of camping gear and an expensive telescope and microscope I bought on my own and I also had three hundred bucks in my own savings account at the bank. By the time I was fifteen I had two hardware charge accounts I got by myself, my father told them he would guarantee I paid. I always paid my bill on time.

Sorry for getting off the topic of agriculture. I guess some companies in Canada are refusing treated oats and grains now. www.producer.com...
edit on 19-5-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 19 2017 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: markosity1973
a reply to: D8Tee

Agreed.

Glyphosate is a poison, but it's so popular because it's not as bad as others.

But one can avoid using it in some cases if they are switched on.

Case and point, instead of spraying fields or before cultivation, my Dad always turned the field over, left it for a week or so until the weed seeds in the soil started germinating then rotary hoed the entire area to a fine tilth.

This always worked well to give the crop (maize or sorghum) a chance to germinate and grow faster than any weeds. Because the crop is so dense, and weeds that germinated were soon choked out by the maize anyways.


That type of farming has been replaced with minimum tillage, continuous cropping and direct seeding.

In the area we are in, cultivation leads to moisture loss and soil erosion.

After dustbowl like conditions in the late 1980's we moved to a minimum tillage type of dryland farming and soil conditions much improved. It's no fun to watching huge dust storms lifting your topsoil and darkening the skies.

In the fall or spring, spray the weeds with a non selective herbicide, then direct seed into the stubble, deepbanding fertilizer with the seed.



posted on May, 19 2017 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

In the early 90's I had a part time job at a malt barley facility, doing the lab testing. We selected the best looking barley, suitable for the malting process. At that time, Roundup was just starting to be used for preharvest application.

The thing with Roundup applied to the crop at preharvest, it will have very low germination rates, which is vital to the malt barley being selected. Malting barley HAS to have a high germination rate. We did not do germination rates on each and every sample selected, only on certain samples that looked 'iffy'. So, we had no real way of telling if there had been Roundup applied to the crop. What we did, was put the word out that if ANY farmer gave us barley with Roundup residue found on it, never again would that farmer be selected to sell their grain to us. The funny thing was, we had no real way of knowing, aside from that germination test that we did on only a small percentage of samples lol. I think the farmers thought we had the procedures in place to actually test for it haha. Faked them out. Testing for Roundup isn't easy, you'd need some expensive Gas Cromatographs and have to invest a lot of time into testing for it.

If it kills the germination of the seed, can it be any good for the humans eating that seed?



posted on May, 19 2017 @ 07:10 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Yeah, where I am soil moisture is not an issue.

But I get it wouldn't work in semi arid climates.

That's why I said in some cases, not all.

I have often wondered if steam or flame methods would work instead of a non selective herbicide for initial spray out before cultivation in those cases.



posted on May, 19 2017 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

I don't know about whether it would effect digestion negatively.

We buy whole grain organic rolled oats, whole grain organic barley, and whole grain organic Rye by the twenty five pound bag and split it among us and my two daughters and their kids. We mix a third of all three of those together and put a half cup in a pot with a cup of water and cook them for fifteen minutes in the mornings a couple times a week. The daughters make a way bigger amount for their families. That is a really tasty combination, add a little sugar or some homemade jam and it fills your mouth with flavor.

Wheat was chosen to push because it actually calms society, it has some powerful opioid peptides, they did not know what it was thousands of years ago but they knew it made the slaves and surfs more content and controllable. In northern Europe they collected Rye and Barley for their grains, I am not sure if oats were in their original grains there or not. Those three grains have some calming chemistry but have lots better food chemistry than Wheat. Wheat actually came from way down in Egypt originally I think. Now remember, they had barley down there two, it is one of mans oldest foods....till they learned to make beer from it over two thousand years ago. Beer was a commodity that brought good money, it gobbled up most of the Barley.

If I am going to study food chemistry, I might as well study some of the real interesting stuff too. When they built the pyramids, the workers supposedly got paid in beer. No wonder they took away woman's rights back then, they were probably real bitchy because their old men were drunk all the time and didn't bring anything home for the kids to eat.



posted on May, 22 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

I live in a part of the world where an invasive plant is causing trouble (Salt Cedar). So i get the need to eradicate and/or control species.

But Roundup....i predict it will be off the market in 10 years. Ther eis a massive collapse of insect species that is currently under reported or just flat out not reported. Bees aren't the only "at risk" insect species. And I suspect we will find pesticides and herbicides at fault.



posted on May, 22 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: dreamingawake

I live in a part of the world where an invasive plant is causing trouble (Salt Cedar). So i get the need to eradicate and/or control species.

But Roundup....i predict it will be off the market in 10 years. Ther eis a massive collapse of insect species that is currently under reported or just flat out not reported. Bees aren't the only "at risk" insect species. And I suspect we will find pesticides and herbicides at fault.
What will it be replaced with?

You take away herbicides and crop yields are going to go WAY down.

Roundup, if you look into it, is not as toxic as it's replacements.



posted on May, 23 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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edit on 23-5-2017 by aliensanonymous because: Issues double quoting



posted on May, 23 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan


I live in a part of the world where an invasive plant is causing trouble (Salt Cedar). So i get the need to eradicate and/or control species.

But Roundup....i predict it will be off the market in 10 years. Ther eis a massive collapse of insect species that is currently under reported or just flat out not reported. Bees aren't the only "at risk" insect species. And I suspect we will find pesticides and herbicides at fault.


No doubt Glyphosate is responsible for bug slaughter worldwide. The companies marketing it are covering up a multitude of negitive health effects associated with the product.


originally posted by: D8Tee
What will it be replaced with?

You take away herbicides and crop yields are going to go WAY down.

Roundup, if you look into it, is not as toxic as it's replacements.


There are natural herbicide replacements, crop rotation and companion planting can be utilised also. Akin to the petro chemical industry (bio diesil/solar);the corprate companies involved monoply on profits from their use would deminish due to the population not having to realy on their unethical practices to preduce, un-sustainable harmful chemicals.
edit on 23-5-2017 by aliensanonymous because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-5-2017 by aliensanonymous because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2017 @ 02:54 PM
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edit on 23-5-2017 by aliensanonymous because: Issues double quoting



posted on May, 23 2017 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: aliensanonymous




There are natural herbicide replacements.
Like what?



posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 12:45 AM
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originally posted by: D8Tee
a reply to: aliensanonymous




There are natural herbicide replacements.
Like what?


Just a brief article.


Organic Herbicides-Do They Work?



TextConsiderations

Organic herbicides all work if you have enough volume and concentration to directly contact the weeds. However, these herbicides are expensive and may not be affordable for commercial crop production at this time. Cost in 2010 was about $400 to $600 an acre for broadcast application, which may be considerably more expensive than hand weeding. Moreover, because these materials lack residual activity, repeat applications will be needed to control perennial weeds or new flushes of weed seedlings. We see these herbicides eventually being used commercially with camera-based precision applicators that “see” weeds and deliver herbicides only to the weeds, not to the crop or bare ground.



Combined with varied other methods stated earlier, can be effective, obviously more expensive and intensivley time consuming. But with the right systems implace could be effective. The money and research for developments has no doubt been stifled due to Bayers monopoly on the market.
edit on 1-6-2017 by aliensanonymous because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-6-2017 by aliensanonymous because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2017 @ 12:49 AM
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a reply to: aliensanonymous

Well, at 400 dollars an acre like you pointed out, that's just not going to work..
Compare that to Roundup at say 10 bucks an acre.

Think of it this way, that 2000 acre farm would be 1 million buks to spray at 500 bucks an acre.
edit on 1-6-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)







 
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