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Calling all archeologists and amateur treasure hunters...

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posted on May, 17 2017 @ 07:26 AM
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It was intended to be a bottle opener, but failed because everyone used flippers or corks. Having it still and not knowing what to do with it, and facing the need for funds, he took it to the market trying to sell it as a door knocker. Unable and discouraged he took it home, hammered a nail into the mantle above the fireplace, where it rests to this day. Despite many queries about it's possible origin and usage, all that can be guessed at is that it is likely French.




posted on May, 17 2017 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

Ask around, get it evaluated and get a couple of quotes. If it is only a trinket then pass it on to your kids.

If you are short of money then try to dig up a Ferrari 250 GTO, they are worth 25 million dollars on average. You mentioned the trinket is one in four so that plays in your favor because it's scarce, but then a dealer will try to knock the price because of minute defects and when they point those out they are looking for a sweet deal,that's when you know it's more valuable then what they let on.

I have a few trinket's of my own dating back a century and the moment they say 'there's a problem here' reject the offer because they are trying to drive down the offering price.



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 08:02 AM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

First, congrats for such a great find. You must find out the price with discretion before taking a decision.

Second, go back to where you found it , there's a great chance you can find more.

Personally, I wouldn't sell it unless its value is more than 1000 dollars.

Cool thread !



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 08:28 AM
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originally posted by: Thecakeisalie
a reply to: Lagomorphe

Ask around, get it evaluated and get a couple of quotes. If it is only a trinket then pass it on to your kids.

If you are short of money then try to dig up a Ferrari 250 GTO, they are worth 25 million dollars on average. You mentioned the trinket is one in four so that plays in your favor because it's scarce, but then a dealer will try to knock the price because of minute defects and when they point those out they are looking for a sweet deal,that's when you know it's more valuable then what they let on.

I have a few trinket's of my own dating back a century and the moment they say 'there's a problem here' reject the offer because they are trying to drive down the offering price.



Boy have you ruined my day...

I was thinking about a Morgan or a Triumph Spitfire M2 (bottle green with the wheel on the back to look all spiffing and all that when I go out posing once every 50 Sunday.s..)

Warmest

Lags



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: Lagomorphe

First, congrats for such a great find. You must find out the price with discretion before taking a decision.

Second, go back to where you found it , there's a great chance you can find more.

Personally, I wouldn't sell it unless its value is more than 1000 dollars.

Cool thread !


I have scoured the whole garden but need a better metal detector now... I have 200m2 to dig up...

Warmest

Lags



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 08:32 AM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol
just did..

Neither was overly expensive as far as good detectors go.. £360 for the Blisstool (second hand) and the £360 for the Golden mask new. both came with two coils each.


Sorry, was juggling between my phone and Comp...

Thanks Solo, all is noted and now going on a detector finding frenzy in order to "cough" hint for fathers day...

Warmest

Lags



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 09:25 AM
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originally posted by: Lagomorphe
How much do you reckon that this item is worth?


It is obviously priceless in esthetic terms, as far as financial value is concerned...beware. Under French law, something that can be deemed an "artifact" automatically belongs to the state. I don't know if this is for the whole of France but it was part of the contract when I bought my new house here in the Charente.

May be worth checking any legal documents for you property and house purchase before considering showing this around too much.

Nice find.

I recently found a "Mosasaur" tooth and root while digging in my garden. Really good condition (and perhaps more to find). Because it is a natural object rather than man made, it doesn't come under the "artifact" laws.

cheers.

Edit to add... it may be possible to make a little money by offering your garden to be dug some more by proffessional archaeologists and/or metal detecting treasure hunters. Let others do the hard work and plan some new landscaping as a condition, sell tea and cakes and charge for admission...lol
edit on 17/5/2017 by nerbot because: stuff



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 09:31 AM
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originally posted by: nerbot

originally posted by: Lagomorphe
How much do you reckon that this item is worth?


It is obviously priceless in esthetic terms, as far as financial value is concerned...beware. Under French law, something that can be deemed an "artifact" automatically belongs to the state. I don't know if this is for the whole of France but it was part of the contract when I bought my new house here in the Charente.

May be worth checking any legal documents for you property and house purchase before considering showing this around too much.

Nice find.

I recently found a "Mosasaur" tooth and root while digging in my garden. Really good condition (and perhaps more to find). Because it is a natural object rather than man made, it doesn't come under the "artifact" laws.

cheers.


Hi Nerbot.

I have already checked it out with our local Mairie (Town hall) and all is good and well and it belongs to me.

You are lucky living in the Charente region which is originally the very beginning of the Loire valley... Lots of fossils to be found and flints too as the Loire valley was under the sea many many years ago. And you have great oysters too...

I have some great specimens of sponge and coral fossils as well as a couple of flint tools (skin scraping devices) found in the field in front of my house.

ETA : As for the digging work, bugger that... my garden is mine... the locals here would pinch the hair of a horses back if they could make some money out of it and they only accept wine (in-laws have a vineyard and they know me)

Warmest

Lags
edit on 17-5-2017 by Lagomorphe because: Phrase added



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 09:55 AM
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a reply to: nerbot

Lots of partypoopers when it comes to fossil finds too...



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe
I hate to be the bearer of bad news good sir, but once you have removed the items from their resting place, you have destroyed their extrinsic historical knowledge. Where you find artifacts and the corresponding items in the vicinity offer vastly more knowledge to the historian than any individual item itself! To paraphrase Sir Leonard Woolley, a shard of pottery with properly documented association may change history, yet a valuable masterpiece may be historically worthless minus its context!

I am not deluded into thinking that you might undertake a proper excavation, but at the very least you should photograph its removal and note very specifically where the object was found, in what relation to other nearby objects, and the depth at which it was discovered, noting all strata (ground layers).

I am less familiar with late period European finds, but this bronze piece appears to be on the younger side of the margin by its appearance and elaborate design.

Value of an artifact is rather subjective. This piece was originally a fantastic work of art, but with oxidation is less appealing. Purely as art I would not place its value so highly as it would be as a gold or silver ornament.

As a historical piece its value sharply inclines. It is mostly in good condition and is a grand example of period artistry. A museum or private collector would surely value it higher for its significance. I would suppose it may fetch a few hundred dollars at most from the general populace, and perhaps a few thousand from dedicated purveyors of history! Good find!



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

I think we'd call it a "Chatelaine." Beautiful object!

If you choose to donate it, do write about where you found it (give a map) and show what else was with it. That will make it more valuable to a museum or collection.

Oh... and PLEASE DON'T CLEAN IT! That destroys the value oddly enough.
edit on 17-5-2017 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 10:39 AM
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Thanks Sargon good advice.

Pics and exact location were noted.

A nice thing about this is that it was found near a well which quite often artifacts can be found around as was a common resting place.

Warmest

Lags

a reply to: SargonThrall



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

Great find - That would look awesome on my front door - Hint



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 10:41 AM
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I would NEVER clean it lol. The pic you see is how it is after only rinsing with water and mild hand soap.

I'm a keen coin collector and am careful.

Warmest

Lags


originally posted by: Byrd
a reply to: Lagomorphe

I think we'd call it a "Chatelaine." Beautiful object!

If you choose to donate it, do write about where you found it (give a map) and show what else was with it. That will make it more valuable to a museum or collection.

Oh... and PLEASE DON'T CLEAN IT! That destroys the value oddly enough.



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: Gargoyle91
a reply to: Lagomorphe

Great find - That would look awesome on my front door - Hint


10 grand And it's yours...



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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To me, the design suggests a type of harness, one piece of two.



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: Plotus
To me, the design suggests a type of harness, one piece of two.


That was my first impression before I did some research on it (See description in my first post along with another poster)

Warmest

Lags



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: Lagomorphe

I just noticed you said you found it at 40 centimeters deep. That's a lot.

Here in USA I found most of my relics at 4 to 7 inches, that's between 10 to 20 centimeters. I confess got 12 inches deep signals ignored a couple of times.

Big mistake



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: Lagomorphe

I just noticed you said you found it at 40 centimeters deep. That's a lot.

Here in USA I found most of my relics at 4 to 7 inches, that's between 10 to 20 centimeters. I confess got 12 inches deep signals ignored a couple of times.

Big mistake


Roughly about 40cm yep but also have to take into account that my garden was once fields too so much soil turnover due to plowing.

Warmest

Lags



posted on May, 17 2017 @ 01:27 PM
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Found a clavandier on EBAY priced at $800 USD



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