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Depot 22

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posted on May, 15 2017 @ 09:53 AM
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In June of 2011, IAF F-15B tail number 110 departed from Tel-Nof AFB, when it was struck by a flock of pelicans. The crew was able to land the aircraft safely, but there was a fire in the aft fuselage that resulted in the aircraft being written off as destroyed. The cockpit and forward fuselage were undamaged. Enter Depot 22.

They began working on the aircraft in 2014, and came up with a plan to return the aircraft to service, as F-15B models are invaluable. They went to the desert, and took aircraft 314 from the Ovda AFB storage yard. It had been parked for 20 years there. They approached Boeing with a plan to take the front end of 110, and mate it to the back end of 314. Boeing didn't answer, because they thought they were joking. In November 2016, the Frankeneagle returned to flight, in testing with the Flight Test Center.

The commander of Depot 22 estimates that he's brought 7 or 8 fighters that were considered write offs back to flight status. In addition, they frequently find problems with aircraft before the OEM does, and come up with work arounds that can be done quickly and more efficiently. When Lockheed warned about bulkhead cracks on the F-16 forward bulkhead, they came up with a way to map them, without defueling and disassembling the aircraft, then came up with a fix that could be done at the unit level.




TEL NOF AIR BASE, Israel – When Boeing, Lockheed Martin or any other U.S. airframe provider says something can’t be done – or that it must be done in a prescribed manner according to company procedures – Depot 22 of the Israel Air Force more often than not will come up with a plan of its own.

Take the case of Arrowhead, an F-15B that recently returned to flight operations after a 2011 mishap which prime contractor Boeing – and the Israel Air Force, at first – had considered a total loss. Next month marks six years since, shortly after takeoff, a flock of pelicans was ingested into one of its engines, sparking a massive fire. The pilot and navigator managed a controlled emergency landing, but the entire back end of the aircraft was burnt beyond repair.

For more than three years, U.S. Air Force officers debated what to do with the 35-year-old two-seater aircraft. Since the entire front end sustained no damage, many favored cannibalizing the cockpit and its avionics in support of other two-seaters in the force. But then specialists in Depot 22 proposed a plan to mate the front end of Arrowhead with the back end of an obsolete single-seater F-15 that had been parked out in the service’s desert “bone yard” for the past 20 years.

www.defensenews.com...


A badly damaged Israeli Air Force (IAF) dual-seater F-15 Baz (Falcon, as the F-15 Eagle is dubbed by IAF) fighter jet will soon return to service with parts coming from a single-seater F-15.

In Jun., 2011, the aircraft, belonging to the “Edge of the Spear” Squadron, took off from Tel-Nof AFB and when it reached 3,000 feet it was hit by a flock of pelicans. Its aircrew immediately performed an emergency landing that severely damaged the rear section of the aircraft.

According to the first accident report, the F-15’s central and rear parts were damaged beyond repair as a result of the engine burning.

theaviationgeekclub.com...




posted on May, 15 2017 @ 10:04 AM
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I have a friend that sees something in every piece of metal you could hand to him. Crazy!!!




posted on May, 15 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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The USAF did that in the 80s with the front half of a Langley bird that had a catastrophic engine fire, and the back half of a bird from the DM boneyard. The article in AF Times, ( or maybe TAC Attack )said the back half was from the Streak Eagle record setter, but I think that that may be open to debate. In any case, it kept another Eagle flying, which is always a good thing! Hats off to the IAF!



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: vinomech

They did it with an SR-71 as well. They used parts from a YF-12 and an SR-71B to make the only C model IIRC.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

And it had a rather scatalogical nickname if I recall...



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 01:36 PM
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a reply to: vinomech

That's what happens when you don't want to fly straight anymore.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 07:37 PM
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There was once a DC-3/C-47 that was damaged and considered a write off. It had one of its wings replaced from a DC-2 and was thereafter referred to as a DC-2 and a half. From memory the wingspan of the DC-2 was shorter than a DC-3 but apparently this franken Dakota flew alright, albeit with a couple of units of rudder trim permanently on I'll bet!



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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On the subject of manufacturers claiming a repair cant be done. Many years ago we had a 200 series 747 that the flight crew reported was starting to make some metallic popping, clicking and banging sounds as it ascended and descended. This sounded serious so maintenance engineers were tasked with getting to the bottom of it. The sounds were coming from the fwd section of the aircraft right near the cockpit. This area is referred to by engineers and production manufacturers as the Section 41 area. They began stripping out linings and cockpit panels and soon discovered severe cracking in the fuselage frames, waaaay... beyond limits. It was decided that the only way to fix it was to actually replace the frames which would be a massive job. So our tech services guys worked out what was causing it (pressurization cycles on those frames which in a 747 are sort of "S" shaped in that part of the fuse) and determined that replacement frames made out of a stronger alloy and with the pressure hull skins replaced by new ones also from a different alloy and one gauge thicker would do the job. They contacted Boeing and explained the problem and asked for their approval for the solution. "Sorry, that cant be done, that would be virtually impossible to do. The only solution I'm sorry is to scrap the aircraft", was the reply. "What do you mean? We have already begun the process and worked out exactly how to do it", our aeronautical engineers retorted. Boeing were open mouthed to say the least. They promptly sent out some very senior engineers, who concluded that we were indeed right. And thus begun the Section 41 mod program that virtually every existing 747 was put through world wide.

..... And they said it couldn't be done! Pfffft

edit on 15-5-2017 by thebozeian because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: thebozeian

Engineers are good at "you can't do that". I've usually found that the unit level guys have a better clue as to what can and can't be done.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 05:29 AM
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a reply to: thebozeian
Aaaahhh section 41..Many days vacuuming up scwarth,replacing hiloks and throwing rivets at grumpy Framies as they walk beneath us..Was a marvel to see one in progress,especially with the cockpit stripped back to a skeleton..



edit on 16-5-2017 by Blackfinger because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 05:32 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Had a major mover and shaker in the Uk historic aircraft fraternity tell us we couldnt hand build a British Icon in the colonies..




posted on May, 16 2017 @ 05:54 AM
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a reply to: Blackfinger
Oh really? Which British Icon was that?
My father as an engineering apprentice worked on making the dies to manufacture Avon engine turbine and compressor blades under license in Australia. The Poms tried to make out we wouldn't be able to do that either. Those engines ended up in NA F-86 Sabres that we flew from the mid/late fifties until the early seventies. I think NA said we wouldn't be able to re-engineer the Sabre to take it, we did and they performed really well. Seems putting down smaller allies and belittling there abilities is a common theme. I guess that's how major powers stave off potential competition and profit at the same time. Occasionally though they end up with egg on their face.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Boeing is in the business of selling aircraft, of course they are going to tell you it can't be done.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

Heh. While working as a watchmaker at a swiss watch company I discovered that the swiss manufacturers sometimes sucked.

On several occasions we had to figure out work arounds for things that the manufacturer couldn't do. Or things that "could not be done". Experience repairing and experience manufacturing are truly 2 different things.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

I've even had the Depot say it couldn't be done. And we went and did it anyway.



posted on May, 16 2017 @ 06:06 PM
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I wonder if the Israelis carried out the longeron mod on the cockpit section while they were at it? Good time to do it.



posted on May, 21 2017 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

www.google.ca...


I give you the Franken Otter.

I am not sure how many planes are involved.



posted on May, 22 2017 @ 03:35 AM
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posted on May, 22 2017 @ 03:40 AM
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Oh really? Which British Icon was that?

Spitfire of course...



posted on May, 22 2017 @ 03:46 AM
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a reply to: Blackfinger
Now THAT was a challenging repair. Do you remember the C-130 that was recovered down there about 25 years ago? I think it was abandoned after a landing accident for quite a few years before recovery.



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