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What Type of Bird Makes This Sound..

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posted on May, 14 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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Longer version..maybe it is more recognizable now? I still don't know what it is. Maybe someone will from this audio.

Bird Call 2

Thanks again everyone.

blend57




posted on May, 14 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: blend57

Sounds just like the Carolina Wrens that are living in my birdhouses at the moment. IMHO. They're very friendly. If you sit outside, they'll come check you out. Maybe try having a sit and watching the yard?
edit on 5/14/2017 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 03:48 PM
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It's a Wren.

We have had one chirping its nuts off here for the past couple of weeks...

"Wren I'm calling yooooooouuuuuuuuuu"

Spring in the air...

Warmest

Lags



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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It sounds kinda fowl? ehahahaha I'm sorry I'm sorry I had to do it.

edit on Rpm51417v48201700000036 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 05:42 PM
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Come on, people. It's a robin.



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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I`m no expert but that sounds like more than just one bird,it sounds like 2 bird calls overlapping.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

We don't get the Redwing Blackbird here in England, but I have heard their call featured on BBC Radio Four's Tweet of the Day, which is an institution for us early risers. They are certainly very attractive birds.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 01:56 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

They always make me think of tall grass and blackberry bushes and strong summer sunshine. I can hear it in my memory.
Yes they are striking with their shiny black feathers and bright red shoulder stripes
England has its own unique bird population though doesn't it.
Your robins are much prettier than ours.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 02:07 AM
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We never ruled out the possibility that the OP recorded the cheep cheep of a chick. A baby who's voice is different from the adults. Last year I had a nest of robins in a big old azalea bush outside my living room window and the babies were louder, higher pitched and more demanding than the sound of the adults.
It was pretty amazing because we could look right down into the nest.
From egg to bald little big eyed things to fledgling and gone. They changed over night sometimes they grew so fast.
Anyway could be a baby and that's why they don't recognize it.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 02:41 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

We're very fortunate in England to have a category known as Garden Birds. Mostly made up of Finches, Thrushes, Pigeons and Doves, many are very colourful and eye-catching. Our European Jay is a quite colourful but I have to confess my envy of your Blue Jay.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 02:43 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
We never ruled out the possibility that the OP recorded the cheep cheep of a chick. A baby who's voice is different from the adults. Last year I had a nest of robins in a big old azalea bush outside my living room window and the babies were louder, higher pitched and more demanding than the sound of the adults.
It was pretty amazing because we could look right down into the nest.
From egg to bald little big eyed things to fledgling and gone. They changed over night sometimes they grew so fast.
Anyway could be a baby and that's why they don't recognize it.


It is refreshing to see you away from the USA political forums for once... Seeing a nicer, humane and more openly tolerant side of you Silly...

For information to all : Brit living in France for the past 30 years smack bang in the middle of the countryside although quite a few (too many) years in the "city" and in the army during my younger days (but had to be done for personal reasons...) AND NO... I will not prove pics n stuff to justify.

Back on topic : As an avid bird watcher for the past 50 or so years (as well as being a veterinarian surgeon with quite a few years experience in the wild animal behaviour part of things throughout the world) and taking into account that the OP is from the UK I have wangled down the bird-song to one of these two (I would say mainly the Plain warbler) :

The plain warbler :

A very plain warbler with no distinguishing features (a feature in itself!). It spends a lot of its time in the cover of trees and bushes and can be more difficult to see than its relative, the blackcap. Despite its name it is not really a garden bird, except in mature gardens next to woods. Its song is similar to that of a blackcap, but has longer mellow phrases.

Sylvia Warbler :

The Sylvia warblers are birds of scrub are perhaps the most visible of the warbler groups, at least in Britain. More robust than the other warbler groups they feed to a greater extent on fruit, particularly in autumn. They are also amongst the more colourful warblers, and are unusual in that the sexes differ in plumage (the female being duller). The Hippolais warblers have a similar body structure, but their green colouration and foraging habits more recalls the leaf warblers, but they are generally scarce visitors to Britain. (However not as scarce as they used to be).

More here : www.bto.org...

All Warblers are part of the Wren family : Sylviidae (there are over 410 species all over the world)... take this info from a veterinary surgeon...

Otherwise, a nice recipe is to have them plucked, emptied and smoke dried (add Madras curry powder if you like) and then add them to the peanuts, crisps and stuff when having an aperitive as they are pretty small when it comes to nibbling (but watch out for the bones)... Sorry, the French coming out in me...

Warmest

Lags
edit on 15-5-2017 by Lagomorphe because: Crap editing



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 05:06 AM
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a reply to: blend57

What about this Blend?
www.allaboutbirds.org...
Maybe?



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 06:29 AM
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TNMockingbird

Ok..so..I have found that there are localized songs that song birds learn from their parents and are only found in that specific area. So, the part of the song that was interesting to me (unique) isn't what I'm supposed to be looking at at all. It is the part that precedes it.


Just as humans have regional accents, some bird species develop distinct, area-specific dialects . Such variation in song often arises when populations of the same species are isolated by geographic features such as mountains, bodies of water, or stretches of unsuitable habitat. These local dialects are then passed on to the next generation of young birds, which hear the songs being performed by their father and other local males. After many generations, the birds from one area can sound quite different from those the next mountain over....


Maybe many of you knew that already, I did not. So, that is helpful.

What I am thinking is it is a Baltimore Oriole.. a couple videos for comparison of the sound:





I have looked through probably 50-75 bird videos..and read through an assortment of articles. This is the closest to what I can find with regards to hitting the different notes and such. I looked through a ton of wren videos and they didn't sound right, black birds, sparrows, cardinals,canaries, finches, warblers, pretty much everything suggested so far. But now I have to look through them again..because I wasn't looking for the preceding sound right before the "song"



Thanks to all of you for the suggestions. I really did research every one. What do you think about the Baltimore Oriole? For me the sounds are all mixing together honestly..I think I've listened to too many..so I can't even tell really anymore...lol

Thanks,
blend57

edit on 15-5-2017 by blend57 because: Always an edit! : /



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: blend57

Sounds (pitch/tone) sounds fairly close, doesn't it?
I've been trying to create a sort of bird sanctuary in my back yard (and it's working if nothing else but a feeding 'hub') so I know what you mean about listening to the sounds and they all start to run together...
On a side note, the birds and the chipmunk, who lives under the basketball goal, have struck up a partnership (of sorts) with regard to the bird feeders. I find it odd that they aren't natural enemies...LOL
The Wikipedia page has another recording of the oriole.
It's not too good but, it may strike a chord with ya.

edit on 15-5-2017 by TNMockingbird because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 07:49 AM
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That sounds like a purple finch or just a common finch are you in America?


Birds



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: 123143


That is NOT a robin.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:08 AM
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I listened to it again maybe a Orchard Oriole?



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: blend57
All I can say is watch and compare:



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: blend57

I hear a high pitch chirp and then a lower pitch chirp almost simultaneously that`s why I think it might be more than one bird call overlapping.



posted on May, 15 2017 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

I was dive bombed by a screeching jay when I was a very young child because I went near its baby on the ground. I was told this, I don't remember the incident. They are the big boys at the feeder . And in the finch family too you probably know.
I get the finches, the cardinals and sparrows and that Jay and I get those slow moving grey pink doves, plenty of insect eaters like the larks and robins, and we get tiny green humming birds, and because I'm right on the coast, sea birds and water fowl of every kind.
I learned about some birds in England from reading Dickens and Jane Austin novels. I googled Rooks when re reading David Copperfield a few years back. Much like our crows but I think bigger.
I'm enjoying this cultural bird exchange. Lol.



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