It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Favorite Science Fiction Book or Series...

page: 2
9
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:20 PM
link   
a reply to: FyreByrd
Dune, up to and including God Emperor. Screw everything after that.
The Hyperion Cantos takes a very close second place.
And it's a bit newer but I really liked Ready Player One. Can't wait for the movie but accept that it's going to get messed up.
edit on 13-5-2017 by Noncents because: Replaced An Eaten Word




posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:24 PM
link   
Gordon R Dickson - any and all Chylde Cycle novels really got me into the SF genre

John Norman - banned as politically incorrect, his Scifi-fantasy GOR novels were quite intriguing as a young man, a very weird combination....

Of course, we're talking 30-40 years ago. Lately, it's been Jim Butcher's Dresden series.

ganjoa



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:25 PM
link   
I am soooo sorry, I almost forgot Jules Verne. Where could my head have been?

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Journey to the Center of the Earth
& Around the World in 80 Days



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: JDeLattre89
a reply to: FyreByrd




A Star Wars book that is scary?


For that, there are only two I can think of off the top of my head that may fit and they are both zombie books . . . 'Death Troopers' and 'Red Harvest'. And yes, I own every Star Wars book written . . . well at least all the ones written prior to Disney buying out Lucas and ruining the Star Wars universe.

But enough on that note, my favorite Sci-fi series:

1) The Star Wars Expanded Universe (all 200+ books together as a continuous series)
2) Orson Scott Card's Ender series
3) Stephen King's Dark Tower series

Runners Up:
Jim Butcher's Codex Alera series
John Ringo's Hot Gate series
Harry Turtledove's Crosstime Traffic Series
Daniel Perkarek's Ultimate Adventure trilogy
Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's Guide (all 5 books)
& H. Piper's Paratime stories

and many many more . . .

Best stand-alone Sci-Fi Novels:

1) Douglas Adams 'Shada' (A Doctor Who Novel)
2) John Ringo's 'The Last Centurian'
3) Steven Coont's 'Saucer'

ummm, well I kinda get sucked into series more than stand alones


Jim Butcher of - hmmm the magician stories - I can't think. I really enjoyed them. Not profound but lots of fun.

That's there are some here I'll look up. Particularly Turledove, he's been mentioned twice and I don't believe I've ever read anything of his.

I like series' too. Allow for so much more detailed exposition.

Makes me think of Julian May's Metaconcert - hmm may have to go back there again too - and I think there is more - yipee.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:33 PM
link   
a reply to: SBMcG




Stephen R. Donaldson "Chronicles"


Yeah I first read them in the 70's before the I read the Lord Of The Rings by Tolkien...great books - Thomas Covenant the leper, anti-hero



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:33 PM
link   
Some Steampunk, here and there but more a fan of the following- William Gibson known for "Neuromancer" and other works. Also, a lot of the book and dice RPGs in the sub genre. It's a given with Philip K. Dick.
edit on 13-5-2017 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: 4003fireglo
Asimov's books are great. I haven't read all of them, though, but he had some pretty great series, especially his Foundation series.

Terry Pratchett's Discworld series is really funny and profound.

Douglas Adam's stuff is mostly harmless. Some of it's good, though.

There was another one, but I forgot what it was.

Arthur C. Clarke's "2001" series was great.

For some reason I really liked "Dragon's Egg" by Robert L. Forward. It's about a civilization that lived on the surface of a neutron star... heavy, man...

"Logan's Run" is OK, I guess. I read it when I was a kid. Seems like "Hunger Games" and that other one... ummmmm... that Mocking Jay series, whatever it is... they're pretty similar to Logan's Run, so if anyone out there likes those series and haven't read "Logan's Run," well... get to it.

I also loved Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quintet when I was younger. I'd probably still love it. I hear there's a film adaptation of "A Wrinkle in Time" coming out soon.

"Micromegas" by Voltaire, along with a bunch of other French titles and authors... "Planet of the Apes" was a French novel before it was a film series. The French! Masters of satire and doom jazz!

Man, I need some new books.


I've never gotten into Terry Pratchet, though he comes highly recommended. I liked Logan's run too - but I thought that was just because of Michael York and Richard Jordon. LOL.

Didn't know that about the French - Doom Jazz you say.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: Noncents
a reply to: FyreByrd
Dune, up to and including God Emperor. Screw everything after that.
The Hyperion Cantos takes a very close second place.
And it's a bit newer but I really liked Ready Player One. Can't wait for the movie but accept that it's going to get messed up.


Tried and tried to get into Hyperion but couldn't. Just too dark or something ...

I did like the younger Herbert's contiuation and prequels to the classic Dune for the most part.

Ready Player One - hmmm -



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: ganjoa
Gordon R Dickson - any and all Chylde Cycle novels really got me into the SF genre

John Norman - banned as politically incorrect, his Scifi-fantasy GOR novels were quite intriguing as a young man, a very weird combination....

Of course, we're talking 30-40 years ago. Lately, it's been Jim Butcher's Dresden series.

ganjoa


You mean the BDSM novels - LOL.

Dresden that's the Butcher series I was looking for.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 08:53 PM
link   
Come on some more contemporary stuff guys...

William Gibson wrote my favorite all time X-Files episode - Kill Switch ... but that was twenty years ago.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 09:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: FyreByrd

I've never gotten into Terry Pratchet, though he comes highly recommended. I liked Logan's run too - but I thought that was just because of Michael York and Richard Jordon. LOL.

Didn't know that about the French - Doom Jazz you say.


I thought it was Farrah Fawcett and Jenny Agutter, and Heather Menzies from the TV series. The book was a bit different, though, and actually had some sequels. There's allegedly plans for another film, but who knows...

Yeah, the French. There's a band named Magma. They're a science fiction band. Their first album was released in 1970 and was about a breakaway civilization - they left Earth to search for a legendary planet named Kobaia. They usually sing their music in Kobaian, a musical but structured language. To me, their first two albums sound like doom jazz, although they genrefied themselves as Zeuhl, which means "vibratory music" or "celestial music," depending on... well... too many variables. Anyway, the break away, search for Kobaia, and go to war with Earth. And after that, they tell a story about an archaeologist who discovers an ancient Pharaoh's tomb. The Pharaoh, Emehnthehtt Re, was learning the secrets of immortality. There's an entire trilogy about it.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 09:14 PM
link   
a reply to: 4003fireglo

A musical or written trilogy?

Learn something new and entertaining every day!!!



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 09:16 PM
link   
a reply to: FyreByrd

I'd have to say my most favorite SciFi book would be Larry Niven's "Ringworld", but I pretty much loved all his Known Space series.

After that would be Isaac Asimov's "Foundation" books.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 09:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: FyreByrd
a reply to: 4003fireglo

A musical or written trilogy?

Learn something new and entertaining every day!!!


Musical. It wasn't their first trilogy, though. The "Theusz Hamtaahk" trilogy is probably their most well known work. They're apparently playing Psycho 2017 in Las Vegas this August, along with the Melvins, Abbath (ex Immortal), Carcass, Swans, etc, which is pretty odd, I think. They are gonna shock some people there...



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 09:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: FyreByrd
Come on some more contemporary stuff guys...

Most modern entertainment of just about every medium is just formulaic garbage. There's not much that's modern worth talking about.

Old Man's War is pretty good for something more modern but it's got a noticeable Starship Troopers vibe.

I recommend Diskworld to people as well but those are (vastly) more fantasy than sci fi. One of the best authors of recent years though.

American Gods is great and the TV show is looking excellent so far. I would recommend reading it if you plan on or have started watching it. Same as Diskworld, heavy on the fantasy.

And, not modern at all but, I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream from the 60's. Beyond excellent stuff.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 10:01 PM
link   
a reply to: FyreByrd

Ender series. Extremely thought provoking and multiple viewpoints.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 10:42 PM
link   
Going back to my childhood:

Madeline L'Engle, starting with A Wringkle in Time

Verne and Wells.



posted on May, 13 2017 @ 10:55 PM
link   
a reply to: SBMcG

Love Donaldson's work. He had me reaching for a dictionary every chapter or two. The man's vocabulary was beyond belief.

I did it in reverse WWII biographies and history, then Sci-fi.
There wasn't much Sci-fi in grade school.

My favorites? Too many to acknowledge here. Nevin and Pournelle's Footfall comes to mind. E.E. Doc. Smith. Both the Lensmen series and the Skylark series. All of Heinlein's work. The old timers, mostly. More recently Robert Jordan's work was enjoyable. Goodkind, you'd enjoy....


Too many one hit wonders to even recall.



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 12:18 AM
link   
a reply to: FyreByrd




Jim Butcher of - hmmm the magician stories - I can't think. I really enjoyed them. Not profound but lots of fun.


Yeah, I never got into his paranormal investigation series (The Dresden Files), but I discovered his Codex Alera along with King's Tower series when I was deployed once with 14 others and only 5 books between us for 4 weeks. Someone had book 3 of the Dark Tower series and someone else had book 2 from Alera, so of course I had to restart both series upon returning home.

Codex Alera is an alternate planet where the armies are essentially Roman legions, but everyone has the power to control nature spirits (I know, more fantasy than Sci-Fi . . . so sue me).



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 12:34 AM
link   
Nice thread!

So much good science fiction to choose from, but if I had to pick just one, it would be DUNE.

If I think about some of the great elements/themes that SF likes to explore--technology, religion, politics, anthropology, environment issues--Herbert managed to create a novel and series that weaves all of those things into a complex tapestry on a grand scale.

Many SF works, solid in their own right, tend to focus on just one or two of those. (Which is not to criticize them for that in any way.) I'm just always amazed at how Herbert managed to work it all into his vision. That novel succeeds on so many levels.

I love the idea of the Mentat assassins and the Bene Gesserit, for example. And then there's the whole notion of the BG working with genetics to bring about a futuristic messiah/super-being--the Kwisatz Hadderach (sp?). Throw in the spice (inspired by oil), galactic geopolitics, tribalism, and giant worms to boot, and it just makes for some of the best SF there is. So DUNE gets my top vote.

Keeping it more contemporary:
Orson Scott Card's Ender books
Joe Haldeman's "The Forever War"
Neal Stephenson
Stephen King's Dark Tower (quite a genre bender in many ways, but definitely elements of SF)
Harlan Ellison
Asimov
Ray Bradbury
William Gibson




top topics



 
9
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join