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The Beginning of Totalitarianism in the U.S: The destruction of the memory of The Confederacy

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posted on May, 11 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Just sharing some insight. Something to keep in perspective.


edit on 11-5-2017 by 4N0M4LY because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 11 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

I can buy that, but this is to me is a first where someones feelings were more important than historical facts. Thank you for your post my friend.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

And that is why I made this thread, to hear ALL opinions and thoughts. Thank you my friend for giving yours and yes peoples feelings do matter; it just still cannot and should not change history.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: 4N0M4LY

Thank you for your posts and perspective my firend. As dark and bloody as our history may be, it is still our history. We must remember and learn from it always, lest we keep repeating it.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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If you take away the symbols of racism, then racism will go away.

Same as if you take guns away, violence will cease and if you take away hospitals, no one will get sick.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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Is there something wrong with putting confederate memorabilia in war museums where people go to purposely observe history?

Funny I don't see the union statues in these locations. Why wasn't Sherman at the capital in SC with a torch in his hand? Would that be insensitive?



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I think it's a different issue. Possibly the same outcome but, statues of men who wanted to keep blacks enslaved in black cities seems stupid to me. Plenty of war museums to go to.

Kind of like how the flag was flown above the capital in SC after the civil rights bill passed. Kind of strange if you ask me.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Sure. Put them in a museum, then the museums will close.

I'd rather have things out in the open.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

So Sherman with his torch in down town Columbia SC? I seriously doubt it.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: luthier
a reply to: DBCowboy

So Sherman with his torch in down town Columbia SC? I seriously doubt it.




*shrugs*

History.

The only thing I care about is the issue of hiding it, "white-washing" it, distorting it, censoring it.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

OK but I am telling you the same people who support the Confederate memorials in public parks and capitals would be screaming about having a Sherman statue. Maybe the monument should be him torching a house full of confederate soldiers since peoples feelings don't matter.

Usually the loosers get a little plack with words on it

edit on 11-5-2017 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

And if you take away anything offensive from view, there is nothing left that's offensive.
Love it, I could go all day with that reality check. Thanks for the post my friend.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Similar issue but not the same. The confederate flag not only represents the confederacy, but in today's society it represents a culture. These statues simply represent history. It was logical to remove the flag, as it would be with any flag representing an Ideology or religion. Thanks for your post my friend.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: Mikemp44

Serious question, meant with good intention.

Why are there no statues in The U.S. of British Kings and Queens who where on the throne during your colonial period?

After all................this is part of your history.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: Mikemp44

What about a Sherman memorial? Why do they always object to those? Could it be feelings?



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

I think that's a good question, and it is a part of our history. i like to think Americans have shown historical traits very much associated with our British heritage. I for one love sweet tea, which has its roots of course with the British Tea trade. I would personally be fine with a statue of the Queen, or King Henry somewhere on display in the northeast; we share a common heritage.


Side note, why is KFC in England FAR SUPERIOR to KFC in Kentucky? Riddle me that! lol



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: Mikemp44




Side note, why is KFC in England FAR SUPERIOR to KFC in Kentucky?


I am afraid i can't answer your question.

I have never tried it.





posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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Is the civil war still being taught about in school? In books?

Yes?

Then it isn't being censored. Then again, I'm not permanently looking for something to become outraged about. So we may see things differently.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:32 PM
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Nobody is going to be striking down civil war memorials, but the monuments to people that held objectionable viewpoints that are completely against what this country now stands for? It's time to put away the pro-confederacy bull# that the rest of the country just ignored after reconstruction.

I have no problems with destroying monuments like "The battle of liberty place" monument. That was a post-war monument that was erected to honor a white supremacy group that died trying to take back New Orleans for the white race. That had nothing to do with the civil war, and everything to do with white supremacy. The funny thing is that a large number of these monuments were erected more than half a century after the civil war ended. There's a statue to Jefferson Davis in New Orleans that was erected in 1911. The "Southern Mount Rushmore," which depicts Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson Davis, was started in 1923, left largely unfinished for decades, then resumed in the late 50's as the civil rights movement was gaining steam. So many of these monuments aren't "A part of history" they're glorifying an inglorious history.

Honor the dead, honor the sacrifice, but honoring confederate individuals, and the social structure they espoused, is reprehensible.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: Slanter

I was just about to write the same exact thing.




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