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Does the Moon stop moving during Full Solar Eclipse?

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posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




I really gotta leave for now, but it seems you might be getting arc-minutes and minutes of time mixed up (maybe? I can't tell at the moment).


I'm not getting anything mixed. The amount of apparant distance (across) you say the moons is bigger, causing it to be able to cover the complete sun for two minutes, is crossed in 1.5 mins in the beginning of the vid. Acually twice or three times that distance.




posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:32 PM
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a reply to: Martin75




You have been given answers.


And I refuted them. If you have nothing of substance to add why post?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:32 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
I was watching some footage of solar eclipses and noticed that the moon appears to stop moving for minutes once it completely covers the sun.

Here is a hint.

You can see the total eclipse (sun completely covered) as long as you are in the shadow(umbra) of the moon. You don't have to be perfectly aligned with the sun and moon for it.

Can you explain why?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:34 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




I really gotta leave for now, but it seems you might be getting arc-minutes and minutes of time mixed up (maybe? I can't tell at the moment).


I'm not getting anything mixed. The amount of apparant distance (across) you say the moons is bigger, causing it to be able to cover the complete sun for two minutes, is crossed in 1.5 mins in the beginning of the vid. Acually twice or three times that distance.

You're getting something seriously wrong here, because, in real-time, there's no way the Moon can cross the Sun in 1.5 minutes. If you're talking about a timelapse video, the totality itself would last seconds.

Please see my post on the previous page.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: wildespace




Phew, finally we're getting somewhere. I'm so dissapointed with most of you in this thread. A person asks a genuine question, but instead of an explanation, you just get impatient, superior, and tell him "just Google it".


Exactly, thank you.




In the second of OP's videos, the timelapse is clearly slowed down for the totality, then sped up again. The important point to note here is that the speed of the Moon relative to the Sun remains constant. The Moon doesn't stop or slow down during the totality.


I don't think so, it shows the same as the first one, only sped up.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

I didn't say cross the sun. I am talking about the section of sun it crosses in the vid in the first 1.5 min of the vid. It is wider than the max difference in apparent size of sun and moon, of which you claim the distance takes 2 mins to cross.
edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
In the second of OP's videos, the timelapse is clearly slowed down for the totality, then sped up again.

This is patently obvious, it practically hit the brakes in the video, so much so that I thought they were still shots during totality.


The important point to note here is that the speed of the Moon relative to the Sun remains constant. The Moon doesn't stop or slow down during the totality.

This is what everyone keeps trying to explain to the OP. The video is misleading and basic math doesn't support the timing, there's no pause button for eclipses. Why he's arguing it is beyond a lot of us, evidently.

edit on 5/8/2017 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah




This is patently obvious, it practically hit the brakes in the video, so much so that I thought they were still shots during totality.


It stands still for 2 mins in the realtime video so how does it not show the same thing. And even then, it stands still for 2 mins in the first vid......



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience
I linked you a timelapse where the Moon is clearly moving while it's eclipsing the Sun. In real-time footage, the motion is very slow to easily notice (apart from the moment the Moon covers or uncovers the tiny sliver of the Sun).

But, as I've just discovered myself, many timelapse videos of eclipses are edited to speed up or slow down the footage, so please don't rely on every video you come across for 100% truth.

What you need to look at is an unadulterated timelapse, or a sped-up real-time footage, zooming on the Sun and the Moon close enough. Then, you'll see that the Moon is still moving while completely covering the Sun.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 06:07 PM
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Here's some cool time-lapse footage: www.youtube.com...



Although it uses greatly sped-up parts leading to and following the totality, the totality itself, when watched at x2 speed, shows that the Moon is moving relative to the Sun's corona.

Ooh, and here's the best video I just found, showing the Moon's movement: www.youtube.com...

Watch at x2 speed.
edit on 8-5-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 06:13 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Nyiah




This is patently obvious, it practically hit the brakes in the video, so much so that I thought they were still shots during totality.


It stands still for 2 mins in the realtime video so how does it not show the same thing. And even then, it stands still for 2 mins in the first vid......
The video you watching must have been doctored. The moon does not ever stop moving.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 06:17 PM
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posted on May, 8 2017 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: Martin75

This video is completely garbage.. A guy wannabe Wikipedia scientist explains to the viewer like children something about the biggest coincidence in our universe about time and space and sun and moon.. pfffff I guess he also believes in Santa Clause
Nothing in/on/around our world is coincidence..
Absolutely nothing




posted on May, 8 2017 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: D8Tee

originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Nyiah




This is patently obvious, it practically hit the brakes in the video, so much so that I thought they were still shots during totality.


It stands still for 2 mins in the realtime video so how does it not show the same thing. And even then, it stands still for 2 mins in the first vid......
The video you watching must have been doctored. The moon does not ever stop moving.


Correct. And has already been mentioned, totality occurs at a different time depending on where you are viewing it.

Totality might happen for me "now", but for someone a few miles east of me, it will happen in a few minutes. And for someone 10s of miles from me, it will happen later than that. For someone 2000 miles east of me, totality will happen about an hour later than me.

So that begs the question:
If the Moon stops during totality, then for whose totality is it stopping?

Mine? The person a few miles from me? The person 10s to miles from me? Or maybe for the person 2000 miles from me?

If the answer is it stops for everyone's totalities, then that means the moon is stopped for almost an hour (and it obviously is not stopped for almost an hour).


edit on 2017/5/8 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 07:26 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: chr0naut



The Moon doesn't make a point shadow on the Earth, it's shadow is quite a large circle. While we are standing in the shadow, we see the Moon as totally obscuring the Sun (as the shadow sweeps across the surface of the Earth). When we come out of the shadow, we see the Sun beginning to peep past the edge of the Moon.


The shadow of the moon on the Earth has nothing to do with it, at all. The only way the moon can obscure the sun in the sky for so long is if it stops moving. You see the speed at which it comes in and goes out again. Why does it stand still in the middle.


Umm, what?

OK, firstly, the Moon is not a flat disk moving over the flat surface of the sky (i.e: the moon is not a cut-out made of paper sliding across a black painted background). It is all very large 3D objects moving at distances (depths) that are way beyond our eyes to discern.

The moon is roughly 384,402 km away. With your eyes only approx 7cm apart, you really can't judge distance of something that far away.

With the limited focal length of our eyes, the entire surface of the Moon appears to be in focus all at the same time. This means we cannot see its 'roundness' by focussing on different parts of the moon. At the moon's distance, our focal equipment is set at 'infinity'.

So we can't judge the Moon's shape or its distance properly with our eyes. The tricks we use to do that won't work.

Now, thinking rationally, the moon must have a size, mustn't it? We can see it, so it must.

If that 'size' is moving between the Earth and the Sun, it must take time until the moon moves out of the way.

The path for the sunlight is blocked while the moon is in front of it, since the sunlight can't shine through a solid object like the Moon.

So the time when the sunlight can't get past the Moon is what we call an Eclipse.

When the light is blocked by something, it casts a shadow. When we are 'in' the Eclipse, we are 'in' the shadow of the Moon. It is that simple.

Also, the moon does remain moving, but you naturally follow it with your eyes.

There's nothing up there for you to register its movement against, so you centre it in your vision and YOU are the one who moves, following the movement of the Moon (and Sun).

It is the same with the cameras that also track the eclipse, to keep it centred. (No-one would want a video of the Eclipse disappearing off screen and so the cameras track it, just like you do with your eyes).

The shadow of the Moon definitely has everything to do with it.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




I really gotta leave for now, but it seems you might be getting arc-minutes and minutes of time mixed up (maybe? I can't tell at the moment).


I'm not getting anything mixed. The amount of apparant distance (across) you say the moons is bigger, causing it to be able to cover the complete sun for two minutes, is crossed in 1.5 mins in the beginning of the vid. Acually twice or three times that distance.


Wait -- are you talking about your second video?

There is no way to know if the time-lapse was shown at a constant speed throughout, or if the video was slowed down to show totality.

That video is not necessarily a reliable investigative tool. You are better off trying to understand the mechanics of an eclipse and figuring out what should happen during one. The Moon may take a couple of minutes between the leading edge starting totality to the time it takes the trailing edge to end totality (so all would appear black for two minutes, except fore the corona -- and maybe THAT is what you say is when the Moon stops), but the Moon would be in continuous motion and at a constant speed throughout those couple of minutes.


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 08:09 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience



Kid....


Is that you Vegeta? From Dragonball? I used to like that stuff back when I actually was a kid......


Because you ARE a child, who has seen some "flat earther" video and has totally bought the "stupid". Your Daragonball allusion highlights your true age. (Dragonball is STILL being aired - Adult Swin,Toonami). Were you a kid last year?

... and in the video, it appears to stop because the cameraman is following the action with the camera.

If the camera had been affixed to the ground and did not follow the movement of the Sun/Moon then the Earth's rotation would have swept the camera along at roughly 28 kilometres every minute. This changes the part of the sky that the camera would be looking at by 0.25 of a degree every minute (you can calculate it using 360 degrees of movement which equals one rotation, divided by 1440 minutes which equals one day).

The moon, seen from the Earth only covers 0.5166666 of a degree, on average.

So in 2 minutes the Eclipse would have moved off centre by twice the diameter of the Moon as seen from a fixed location on Earth. Some Eclipses can take 7 minutes (depending on a number of factors) which puts the eclipse way out of frame well before the eclipse is over.

edit on 8/5/2017 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: WeirdScience



Kid....


Is that you Vegeta? From Dragonball? I used to like that stuff back when I actually was a kid......


Because you ARE a child, who has seen some "flat earther" video and has totally bought the "stupid".

Can we please not get personal with each other? You don't know anything about the person who started this thread, or their intentions. Let's attack the ideas, not the people.
edit on 8-5-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 10:47 PM
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originally posted by: nothingiscoincidence
a reply to: Martin75

This video is completely garbage.. A guy wannabe Wikipedia scientist explains to the viewer like children something about the biggest coincidence in our universe about time and space and sun and moon.. pfffff I guess he also believes in Santa Clause
Nothing in/on/around our world is coincidence..
Absolutely nothing


That guy is an astronomer who has worked as part of the Hubble Space Telescope team. He knows his stuff.

The Moon looking roughly the same size as the Sun is indeed a coincidence. Stop mudding the waters.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: Martin75

Video is good, thanks for posting.



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