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Does the Moon stop moving during Full Solar Eclipse?

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posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Yes, so how does this very small difference in apparant size support your claim? This almost insignificant extra amount of distance it has to cross to clear the surface of the sun, is 2 mins worth?




posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: roadgravel

Both do not discuss the observation we are discussing here. I don't know what makes you think it does.



I think the problem here is that you are being literal when you say "the moon appears to stop", as if you are saying that the Moon actually appears to stop.

What is happing is that during those total eclipses that totality takes a little while (such as 2 minutes), totality isn't lasting that long because the moon stops, but rather because the moon (having an apparent size that is large than the Sun) takes 2 minutes to between the leading edge covering the sun and the trailing edge uncovering the Sun.

Lets use an extreme example, and say the Moon appeared TWICE as big as the Sun (which isn't possible with our current orbits, nut lets say it is), totality would last a lot longer than 2 minutes. If it were FOUR times larger, totality would last longer yet.

If it were smaller, as is the case of an annular solar eclipse, then there would be no real totality.


EDIT TO ADD:

I'll answer your question above in another post.






edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: WeirdScience

If the moon can "appear" to reverse direction during the eclipse, would that not make the time difference (your evolved question) possible at times? Hopeless...


This is what they are discussing,


So much for how eclipses happen — but one question that often comes up is, why does the eclipse go from West to East, when the Sun and Moon go the other way?


It has nothing to do with stopping, slowing down, reversing or the appearance of this. They are explaining why an eclipse seems to go the wrong way in relation to the motion of the bodies.

Don't make stuff up.




If the moon can "appear" to reverse direction during the eclipse,


They are not saying it appears to reverse direction during the eclipse....., don't make up nonsense.
edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience

originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: WeirdScience

If the moon can "appear" to reverse direction during the eclipse, would that not make the time difference (your evolved question) possible at times? Hopeless...


This is what they are discussing,


So much for how eclipses happen — but one question that often comes up is, why does the eclipse go from West to East, when the Sun and Moon go the other way?


It has nothing to do with stopping, slowing down, reversing or the appearance of this. They are explaining why an eclipse seems to go the wrong way in relation to the motion of the bodies.

Don't make stuff up.



Stop relying on others. Be intuitive and do some researching instead of wanting handouts of information, which, you can find yourself.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:59 PM
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Either the whole eclipse goes from West to East, or it goes from East to West, it has nothing to do with stopping or slowing down or the appearance of this.



You, as hard as you try, are not going to find a "the moon stops" is the answer. You cannot be sure of how accurate the videos are either.

I can see your difficulty. You have a preconceived notion and the answer may not be that notion.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




What is happing is that during those total eclipses that totality takes a little while (such as 2 minutes), totality isn't lasting that long because the moon stops, but rather because the moon (having an apparent size that is large than the Sun) takes 2 minutes to between the leading edge covering the sun and the trailing edge uncovering the Sun.


This is complete BS because we know from the vid it crosses like 3 or 4 times such a distance in 1.5 min.




edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

No, you completely misinterpreted the point discussed in your own link and are talking nonsense. There is no reversal of direction during an eclipse. You made this up. They weren't saying that.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience


Instead of trying to get people to say what you want them to say in a feat of triumph, which isn't going to happen, how about you tell US what you think you see and how it works, and why.

Go on, tell us. This is the Space forum,, unlike skunkworks there is an expectation of actual discussion and data sharing.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:10 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Yes, so how does this very small difference in apparant size support your claim? This almost insignificant extra amount of distance it has to cross to clear the surface of the sun, is 2 mins worth?


As one of the links I posted in an earlier response to your questions describes the apparent motion of the Moon in the sky relative to the rest of the sky. Again, this is due mostly to the fact that the moon is revolving around the earth as well as the Earth rotating under the Moon, Sun, and stars.

- That apparent EASTWARD motion of the Moon is about 0.5 degree every hour (while the sky moves westward).
- 0.5 degrees is 30 arc-minutes per hour.
- 30 minutes of arch per hour is 0.5 minutes of arc per minute of time.

Going back to this graphic from another earlier post...



...we can see that the moon could potentially be 1.9 arc-minutes larger than the Sun.

If that were the case, then it could take the Moon almost 4 minutes to go that extra 1.9 arc-minutes that it is larger.

Now, I don't know if the moon was ever 1.9 arch minutes larger than the Sun during a total eclipse, but if it were only half that difference in size (say about 1 arc-minute larger), then it could really take 2 minutes for the moon to move that extra distance when it is covering the Sun.


Edit to add:
I need to mow my lawn (only dry day for a while), so I'll step away from the conversation for now.


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

It moves across a much larger stretch than that in 1.5 mins, like I just told you twice and now for the third time.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:17 PM
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Perhaps the poster of the video intentionally slowed down that section of the video but didn't tell you? So, the video may not reflect the reality. That is a possibility, is it not? I suggest you ask your video poster that question.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:18 PM
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Good god, OP, are you really too dense to type a question in to Google and hit enter? Here's your answer.



How long does a solar eclipse last? (Beginner)

It varies depending on several factors: whether it is a partial or total eclipse, how close the moon is to the earth in its elliptical orbit (this affects the apparent size and speed of the moon), how close the earth is to the sun in its orbit (this affects the apparent size of the sun), etc. In general, though, a total eclipse takes on the order of a couple of hours from start to finish, with totality (the part where the sun is completely blocked out) on the order of a couple of minutes.

It's actually pretty easy to estimate the first number - all you have to know is the apparent angular size of the sun and moon in the sky (about half a degree each) and the the time it takes the moon to orbit the earth (about one month). I'll explain how to do that in the next paragraph, but you can think about it yourself beforehand if you want...

[Answer: the entire disk of the moon (half a degree) has to move across the entire disk of the sun (half a degree), so the moon has to move one degree with respect to the sun between the start and end of the eclipse. One degree is 1/360 of the way around a circle and therefore 1/360 of the moon's orbit around the earth. 1/360 of one month is on the order of a couple hours.]

curious.astro.cornell.edu...

The short version: it's basic math. Try it.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

It moves across a much larger stretch than that in 1.5 mins, like I just told you twice and now for the third time.


No. The moon moves eastward (relative to the rest of the sky) about 0.5 degrees, or 30 minutes of arc, in 1 hour.

That means it moves 0.5 minutes of arc in 1 minute (30 arc-minutes "divided by" 60 minutes of time = 0.5 arc-minutes)

That's the speed the Moon appears to move relative to the Sun.

So if the Moon appears 1 arc-minute larger than the sun during a total eclipse, it could take 2 minutes of time between the time the leading edge of the moon covers the sun completely to the time the trailing edge begins to allow the sun to peek out.


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Look at the vid for crying out loud, the first one, look at the distance it crosses in 1.5 min to full coverage, that distance is way bigger than the max difference in apparent size.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: chr0naut





The Moon doesn't make a point shadow on the Earth, it's shadow is quite a large circle. While we are standing in the shadow, we see the Moon as totally obscuring the Sun (as the shadow sweeps across the surface of the Earth). When we come out of the shadow, we see the Sun beginning to peep past the edge of the Moon.


The shadow of the moon on the Earth has nothing to do with it, at all. The only way the moon can obscure the sun in the sky for so long is if it stops moving. You see the speed at which it comes in and goes out again. Why does it stand still in the middle.

Have you had science?
Why do you ask a question and then argue with the person who gives you an answer?
If you knew the answer, why ask?
If you don't know the answer, why argue?
You have been given answers.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:24 PM
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Ok, here is your answer.

It is magic.

I'm outta here before my IQ drops another 10 points.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah


It's actually pretty easy to estimate the first number


The first number which is this,


In general, though, a total eclipse takes on the order of a couple of hours from start to finish,


Not this,


with totality (the part where the sun is completely blocked out) on the order of a couple of minutes.


So it is not easy to estimate the time of totality? Why, it's simple math right.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa




I'm outta here before my IQ drops another 10 points


Impossible.
edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Look at the vid for crying out loud, the first one, look at the distance it crosses in 1.5 min to full coverage, that distance is way bigger than the max difference in apparent size.


I really gotta leave for now, but it seems you might be getting arc-minutes and minutes of time mixed up (maybe? I can't tell at the moment).

However, as I mentioned above, the bottom line is this:

Given the apparent speed of the Moon eastward against the rest of the sky (and the Sun), if the Moon appears 1 arc-minute larger than the sun during a total eclipse, it could take 2 minutes of time between the time the leading edge of the moon covers the sun completely to the time the trailing edge begins to allow the sun to peek out.


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Why do you act like I need to be schooled about the movement of the moon? I asked you if there was any scientific literature that discusses the fact that the moon appears to stand still for two minutes.

So is there an explanation for this that was not just made up by an ATS member?


In addition, the moon is NOT necessarily the exact same apparent size of the Sun during every eclipse. Depending ion where everything is in their orbits, the Sun could be farther from the earth than average making the Sun a little smaller at times, and the Moon could be closer than average at times, making the moon appear a little larger.

So it might take a little while for that slightly larger (apparent size) Moon to cross the slightly smaller (apparent size) Sun.

Phew, finally we're getting somewhere. I'm so dissapointed with most of you in this thread. A person asks a genuine question, but instead of an explanation, you just get impatient, superior, and tell him "just Google it".

I can see where the OP's coming from; when I first saw total solar eclipse footage, I also wondered by does the Moon seem to just stop there and cover the Sun for a couple of minutes.

I beleive Soylent Green has given the correct answer here - in such cases of a total solar eclipse, the Moon is slightly larger than the Sun, and thus covers it completely for a bit longer.

I can confirm this from my own experience watching a video of a total solar eclipse: during the totality, the black disc of the Moon kept on moving, gradually covering more of the corona ahead of it, and uncovering the corona behind it (all the while completely covering the Sun).

Here's a great timelapse showing that the Moon is still moving as usual: www.youtube.com...

(wach it at x0.25 speed)

In a total eclipse where the apparent diameters of the Moon and the Sun were exactly the same, the totality would last just a few seconds.

In the second of OP's videos, the timelapse is clearly slowed down for the totality, then sped up again. The important point to note here is that the speed of the Moon relative to the Sun remains constant. The Moon doesn't stop or slow down during the totality.
edit on 8-5-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



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