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Does the Moon stop moving during Full Solar Eclipse?

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posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: SirKonstantin

Posters that deserve way more respect than you have already admitted that there is no such answer to be found.

If you have nothing of substance to add I will have to ask you to stop derailing my thread.




posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




To answer your question directly about "why does the Moon appear to stop", the only answer I can give you is that the motion of the moon eastward relative to the Sun and rest of the Sky happens so slowly that it is covering the Sun for those two minutes.


Yes and this answer is complete hogwash. Once again, it takes 1.5 min to cover that gap, what's different in the next two minutes of complete coverage? Your "explanation" doesn't explain this.



And the part of my answer about the moon being a little larger than the Sun during some eclipses, making totality last longer than other eclipses didn't help either?



Nope. Care to post the extent of this difference.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: SirKonstantin

Posters that deserve way more respect than you have already admitted that there is no such answer to be found.

If you have nothing of substance to add I will have to ask you to stop derailing my thread.






posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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Haven't read the thread but it appears that way because the Earth is rotating and the moon is orbiting.
Think opposite parallax. Like when you ride a car and you watch trees in the distance and they seem to stay still when nearby objects whiz by.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




To answer your question directly about "why does the Moon appear to stop", the only answer I can give you is that the motion of the moon eastward relative to the Sun and rest of the Sky happens so slowly that it is covering the Sun for those two minutes.


Yes and this answer is complete hogwash. Once again, it takes 1.5 min to cover that gap, what's different in the next two minutes of complete coverage? Your "explanation" doesn't explain this.



And the part of my answer about the moon being a little larger than the Sun during some eclipses, making totality last longer than other eclipses didn't help either?



Nope. Care to post the extent of this difference.





posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Krakatoa

Does it explain why it appears to stand still for two minutes?


This is not a serious question, right? This is just for laughs, right?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:34 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: SirKonstantin

Posters that deserve way more respect than you have already admitted that there is no such answer to be found.

If you have nothing of substance to add I will have to ask you to stop derailing my thread.



If a direct answer to a question (any question) cannot be found, then it usually takes a little investigation to logically discern an answer. In this case, that investigation would include learning details about the mechanics of an eclipse in an attempt to picture in your mind what is happening.

For example, the fact I mentioned earlier (that you ignored in your last response to me) about the moon sometimes having an apparent size that is LARGER than the apparent size of the Sun should help provide a logically-deduced explanation as to why the Moon sometimes takes two minutes to uncover the Sun.

Other times the Moon looks smaller, so logically totality will never happen, and I suppose the Moon and Sun could appear the EXACT same size, in which case we could use logic to deduce that totality would only last a few moments



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

It does not appear to stand still for 2 mins? It clearly appears to do so in the vids I posted in my OP, so, no, it is not a joke.

Did you look at the vids in my OP?


edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

So I ask you again, what is the extent of this difference in apparent size?
edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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Check out the "It goes the wrong way" and "It changes direction" at this link.

Centered on Earth or Off-center.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience

Eliptical path of the earths moon in relationship to the sun? Any movement outside of a perfect circle would cause your observed effect...what was that called back in art class?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Krakatoa

Does it explain why it appears to stand still for two minutes?


This is not a serious question, right? This is just for laughs, right?


Brah, the kid is serious with this question.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

So I ask you again, what is the extent of this difference in apparent size?


Here's a graphic (ignore the stuff written inside about the ISS and planets for the sake of this thread):


Caption: Comparison of minimum and maximum apparent sizes of the Sun and Moon (and planets). An annular eclipse can occur when the Sun has a larger apparent size than the Moon, whereas a total eclipse can occur when the Moon has a larger apparent size

And here is the source of the graphic:

en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:40 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

So I ask you again, what is the extent of this difference of apparent size?


The Earth to Moon separation (distance therefore apparent size) causes both total and annular eclipses, so it's enough to cover/not cover the sun's disk.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

Both do not discuss the observation we are discussing here. I don't know what makes you think it does.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

So I ask you again, what is the extent of this difference in apparent size?



When a problem comes along
You must Google it
Before the cream sits out too long
You must Google it
When something's going wrong
You must Google it
Now Google it
Into shape
Shape it up
Get straight



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

That is not an asnwer to that question that I asked another poster. Don't know why you think it is.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:41 PM
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Simulation.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience


Wait, low post count, recent registration....

Are you that FE guy who keeps popping into other threads, then quits when bested, only to return with another account after a couple days posting new and slightly different BS ?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience

If the moon can "appear" to reverse direction during the eclipse, would that not make the time difference (your evolved question) possible at times? Hopeless...



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