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Does the Moon stop moving during Full Solar Eclipse?

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posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Are you making this up on the spot or is there any scientific literature on this that you are getting this from.



Which part do you mean? That the Sun and Moon appear to move through our sky due mostly to the rotation of the Earth? That happens because the earth is rotating, and that rotation makes the sky above appear to move.


The fact that the Moon also has a motion slowly "backward" relative to the Sun due to the Moon's orbit around the Earth is less common knowledge than why the Sun rises and sets. However, that motion of the moon becomes obvious once you consider that the moon rises about 60 minutes later each night (or day) relative to the day before. That is, if it rises ~60 minutes later, then it must be moving a little more slowly that the Stars and Sun appear to move under the rotating earth.

Here is a link describing the motion of the Moon across the sky:

cseligman.com...


As for how that all ties into the eclipse, and the fact that the Moon DOES NOT stop during totality, I wasn't getting that information from any online link, but instead just picturing in my head how all of the motions go together.

However, here is a link about how eclipses work. This link includes the eastward motion of the moon relative to the westward motion of the rest of the sky. This motion of the moon relative to the rest of the sky happens whether there is an eclipse or not. It's simply how the Moon appears to move in our sky:

cseligman.com...


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:03 PM
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It moves at a consistent speed, the speed diff optical illusion is caused by the circle shapes.
A square wouldn't allow the light to "ramp" up and down like that.

my unscientific guess

edit on 5 by Mandroid7 because: (no reason given)

edit on 5 by Mandroid7 because: correction



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Why do you act like I need to be schooled about the movement of the moon? I asked you if there was any scientific literature that discusses the fact that the moon appears to stand still for two minutes.

So is there an explanation for this that was not just made up by an ATS member?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

....and I suppose the tides would protest if the Moon stopped moving.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:07 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Krakatoa

Does it explain why it appears to stand still for two minutes?





Did you read it all, including the reference links? If not, then you are just being lazy now, IMO. And frankly, I would rather spend my time responding to someone willing to "do the work".

SMH



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:08 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




It's simply how the Moon appears to move in our sky:


Yeah, so why does it take 1.5 min to fill that gap(in thefirst vid) then 2 minutes of nothing. I mean it keeps moving at the same speed regardless of your irrelevant straw man explanation.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:08 PM
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Does the moon and/or Earth stopping in it's motion in space actually sound realistic?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

All I see sofar is people responding with stuff they just made up or vague references to information supposedly explaining this.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

That is not really the point is it. The point is why does it appear to stop for two minutes.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:14 PM
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The question was "Does it stop". So it is the point.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Why do you act like I need to be schooled about the movement of the moon? I asked you if there was any scientific literature that discusses the fact that the moon appears to stand still for two minutes.

So is there an explanation for this that was not just made up by an ATS member?



To answer your question directly about "why does the Moon appear to stop"...

the only answer I can give you is that the motion of the moon eastward relative to the Sun and rest of the Sky happens so slowly that it is covering the Sun for those two minutes.

I'm not sure if there would be scientific literature on the subject, considering it is simply due too the relative motion of the Moon being slow and subtle. That is to say, it takes about 2 minutes because it is a slow process.

In addition, the moon is NOT necessarily the exact same apparent size of the Sun during every eclipse. Depending ion where everything is in their orbits, the Sun could be farther from the earth than average making the Sun a little smaller at times, and the Moon could be closer than average at times, making the moon appear a little larger.

So it might take a little while for that slightly larger (apparent size) Moon to cross the slightly smaller (apparent size) Sun.

During other eclipses, the Moon may be farther from earth than average and the Sun closer than average, which means the Moon may appear smaller than the Sun, and there would never be real totality, but instead a ring of sunlight around the slightly smaller-looking moon.

This ring-of-sunlight-around-the-moon eclipse is called an "annular eclipse" and is sometimes referred to as the "ring of fire".


edit on 8/5/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

Sigh, I was being sarcastic. I should have known better.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience

The earth orbits the sun counterclockwise, as viewed from above.

The moon orbits the earth counterclockwise, as viewed from above.

If one uses critical thinking skills, the answer is obvious...

Alternate answer: Because the Russians.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




To answer your question directly about "why does the Moon appear to stop", the only answer I can give you is that the motion of the moon eastward relative to the Sun and rest of the Sky happens so slowly that it is covering the Sun for those two minutes.


Yes and this answer is complete hogwash. Once again, it takes 1.5 min to cover that gap, what's different in the next two minutes of complete coverage? Your "explanation" doesn't explain this.


edit on 8-5-2017 by WeirdScience because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: WeirdScience

/sarc tags do help, as sarcasm doesn't translate well on the interwebs.

No worries.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: roadgravel

Sigh, I was being sarcastic. I should have known better.


OK. Didn't seem to be a sarcastic post but that's just me, I suppose. I imagine a good bit of the "appears to" part is perception.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: roadgravel

Sigh, I was being sarcastic. I should have known better.


You,

Should have known better, known more, and known how to use google. F**k!, you have reached a level of stupid that makes a rocking chair seem smarter.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:23 PM
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a reply to: cynicalheathen




If one uses critical thinking skills, the answer is obvious...


I don't see why and how this would make it appear as if there was no motion at all for two minutes, only at the moment of full coverage. It was moving at considerable speed as it was covering the sun. It was moving at considerable speed as it moved away from the sun......the period of full coverage in between.......no visible movement at all.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




To answer your question directly about "why does the Moon appear to stop", the only answer I can give you is that the motion of the moon eastward relative to the Sun and rest of the Sky happens so slowly that it is covering the Sun for those two minutes.


Yes and this answer is complete hogwash. Once again, it takes 1.5 min to cover that gap, what's different in the next two minutes of complete coverage? Your "explanation" doesn't explain this.



And the part of my answer about the moon being a little larger than the Sun during some eclipses, making totality last longer than other eclipses didn't help either?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: WeirdScience
a reply to: cynicalheathen




If one uses critical thinking skills, the answer is obvious...


I don't see why and how this would make it appear as if there was no motion at all for two minutes, only at the moment of full coverage. It was moving at considerable speed as it was covering the sun. It was moving at considerable speed as it moved away from the sun......the period of full coverage in between.......no visible movement at all.





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