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Students suspended for liking racist photos on Instagram

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posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

Anyway the school policy is no cyberbullying and this can be considered a form of cyberbullying. And from school's perspective it can cause disruptions at the school.




posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




Was proving a case with him about the media trying to make it appear as if those type of "liberals" are widespread and that all liberals are like this. The articles just cannot help but mention that the school is near Berkeley.


Then I'm sure that is just a coincidence, and those types of liberals are not widespread.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




Anyway the school policy is no cyberbullying and this can be considered a form of cyberbullying. And from school's perspective it can cause disruptions at the school.


School policy has no reach beyond school grounds.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

It's like the left-wing media mentioning the Westboro Baptist Church being near the school if this had happened there.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

Cyberbullying is beyond school grounds and it can cause disruptions at school, which is also against the policy.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




It's like the left-wing media mentioning the Westboro Baptist Church being near the school if this had happened there.


It isn't. The Globe and Mail is like the New York Times of Canada.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




Cyberbullying is beyond school grounds and it can cause disruptions at school, which is also against the policy.


Are you saying school policy extends beyond the borders of the school into private property? If that is the case it is more evidence of Orwellian tactics by a politically correct thought police.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

An hypthetical situation to illustrated my point.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

When it bring disruptions to the school, it becomes a school issue. Besides I wonder how the school found out about it. Someone had to bring it to the school.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




An hypthetical situation to illustrated my point.


A real example would help your case better than a hypothetical I think.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: knowledgehunter0986

I agree with the suspension of the guy posting the lynching image.

It's a reluctant burden to schools and colleges in terms of ensuring the smooth running of their places. It's been thrust upon them by necessity because FB posts can lead to discord and conflict in the schools/colleges. It's not ideal and, yes, it's understandable that you believe freedom of speech transcends everything else.

In terms of behaviour management, there could be students in the same class and one or more of them has been making extreme comments on FB. The target then exercises their 'freedom of speech' in the classroom and lessons are disrupted. Or the degree of the comments escalates to violence and requires staff to intervene or police to be called in. There's a risk of 'Balkanising' a school/college cohort that would undermine the community ethos of the establishments. Your counter argument might revolve around many educational provisions already being 'Balkanised' and it's fair comment. Nevertheless I think the aspiration to be inclusive remains.

In other examples, there might be a campaign against a vulnerable student that causes psychological damage and interferes with the safeguarding obligations of the school/college. By vulnerable, I mean they might be socially isolated and unable to draw on support from friends. They might be having treatment for depression or bereavement and thus more likely to self-harm or become suicidal.

Most people would feel a moral imperative to prevent this from happening despite the valuable need for freedom of speech.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




When it bring disruptions to the school, it becomes a school issue. Besides I wonder how the school found out about it. Someone had to bring it to the school.


We're in the twilight zone when an Instagram like can be considered a disruption.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

cy·ber·bul·ly·ing
the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature.

Someone posted a link to their policy and punishments and cyberbullying and causing disruptions are part of it.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien




cy·ber·bul·ly·ing
the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature.

Someone posted a link to their policy and punishments and cyberbullying and causing disruptions are part of it.


I'm aware of what cyber-bullying is. If the school had a policy against chewing gum would they not be allowed to chew gum off school grounds?



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

I wouldn't argue with whatever the case may be for the fellow that posted the photo. It was absolutely distasteful and wrong, and if he did violate some school regulation, than his suspension is well deserved, but if he didn't and the school decided on their own to regulate the situation, that's absolutely wrong on them. They should've atleast spoke with the parent's or reported it to the authorities for further investigation. Assuming intentions is terrible practice and opens a very dangerous road.

My issue is more with the others that liked the photo. One guy got suspended for a "yep" comment. I mentioned earlier in the thread, is there a difference between somebody that likes a photo with somebody that doesn't, even if they both feel the same way? Does liking a photo make you more racist than the other guy? I bet there were tons of students that liked the photos but didn't click the like button.

So in that regard they went too far.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: TheTory

Do other students know when you are chewing gum at home?



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: TheTory
a reply to: Deaf Alien




When it bring disruptions to the school, it becomes a school issue. Besides I wonder how the school found out about it. Someone had to bring it to the school.


We're in the twilight zone when an Instagram like can be considered a disruption.


It's really not a surprise.

Half these idiots think tweeting about feeding the homeless is the same as actually feeding the homeless.

So when some idiot does something racist online, they figure it's as bad as burning a cross on someone's lawn then shooting them then hanging them from a tree.
edit on 5-5-2017 by DBCowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Doesn't understand the point and start calling them idiots.
Who's the idiot?

Besides I was the one who agreed that the likes are ambiguous.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien

Idiots = those that wee themselves and want to suspend the OTHER idiots who did a racist meme (or whatever) online.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Ah thanks for the clarification. LOL.

Anyway this will be settled in the court hopefully.
I still want to know how it was brought to school's attention.



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