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‘Spectacular’ 3,000yo axe heads uncovered in Norwegian field

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posted on May, 4 2017 @ 07:17 PM
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[url=http://]https://www.rt.com/viral/387179-norway-ax-archaeology-discovery/?utm_source=browser&utm_medium=aplication_chrome&utm_campaign=chrome[/url ]

Wow check this out!



An archaeological treasure trove of ancient ax heads uncovered in Norway is being hailed as one of the single biggest Bronze Age discoveries of its kind in the Nordic nation.




posted on May, 4 2017 @ 07:22 PM
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For 3000 years old.

Pretty damn good shape.




posted on May, 4 2017 @ 08:09 PM
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I know huh? Even the design has not changed all that much. Which is interesting in itself really. I.e. to evolve into that shape etc.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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Cool find!
It looks smaller than I imagined. Would this have been used for wood carving instead of chopping?




posted on May, 4 2017 @ 08:42 PM
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Interesting. But, what draws me into this is how small they are! Smaller than a persons hand.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: strongfp


Indeed. My first thought was that rather than an axe, it looks more like a blacksmiths straight peen hammer head.
Modern straight peen.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: strongfp

looks more like something off a johndeer combine. if it really is 3k years old, i'm betting it was a weapon, some type of war axe.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: weirdguy

Yeah, that's what I thought too. Perhaps there were a shortage or metals or.......it's a model? One that someone was buried with or to be buried with?



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno
The bronze age ones look quite a bit different from the viking-age ones. Especially the bearded axes and the Danish style axes. But yea general shape hasnt changed much over millenia due to practicality of the shape!


a reply to: strongfp
Keep in mind people were a lot smaller back then. Copenhagen museum has a lot of tiny shields and swords that could be for children if they werent so heavy!


a reply to: weirdguy
In Scandinavia there is no real difference between a war axe and a logging axe, especially in the bronze age. The iron age had more specialised designs (like the long, thin axes for shipbuilding and skiving)



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:38 PM
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You say it's 3000 years old, eh? I'm not sure but I got a buddy who's an expert on 3000 year old axes. I gonna give him a call.

.....


Ok, the best I can do for you is $25. The market is saturated with 3000 year old ax heads. Even at $25 I'm not making anything.




posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: Ridhya
Fascinating,
The scandanavian bronze age was heavily influenced by mediteranian trade, what fascinates me, is they have adapted portions of a new technology(bronze axes), to a hybrid bronze age/paleolithic hafting system.
By the time they were casting thosd heads, nearly everybody else was using axes with a central hole, like a modern axe, but they adapt a 100 k year or more hafting system to a cast axe head.
Instead of casting a hole they cast a socket and expected twine to hold it in place, thats not going to work very well.
In other pictures of the find I saw some spear points and daggers as well, it might have been a battle field.
edit on p0000005k52542017Thu, 04 May 2017 21:52:31 -0500k by punkinworks10 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 09:45 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Sure don't look old.

Looks like it's painted green and hammer forged.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 10:26 PM
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a reply to: punkinworks10
Scandinavia was the ends of the world to Europeans, keep in mind we got pretty much every idea last. Even our boats didnt have sails until the viking age!

Bronze axes are (apparently) more difficult and brittle to cast with the hollow shaft-hole. Not to mention lighter. Probably a matter of preference because we had socketed spear heads at that time. Wood is plentiful in Scandinavia, copper/tin not so much. So we could afford to make a million handles, but couldnt afford to have weak blades.

Iron was stronger and more plentiful so holes abound:



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 10:44 PM
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I wonder if the one shown in the photo is not actually an Axe? Could it be some sort of handheld tool for shaving wood or similar as the end seems to either be a hammer or designed to fit in the palm of your hand? Just a thought. I've seen something like this before somewhere?? Help me out people....... Jewelry? Leather craft.....I can't remember.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 11:33 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Yep,too small and lite to be used as a weapon I reckon. I'd say its a finishing plane of some type, and copper based by the colour if it.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 12:13 AM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Nice!! I'd bet you could still chop down a tree with that thing!! Built to last, eh??




posted on May, 5 2017 @ 12:49 AM
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originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes
a reply to: CaptainBeno

Nice!! I'd bet you could still chop down a tree with that thing!! Built to last, eh??


Only if it's a really small tree.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Looks like a felling or splitting wedge.

That thing don't look 3000 years old.
edit on 5-5-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Splitting wedge is a good possibility man,doesn't look that flared over on the striking head though.



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 01:40 AM
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i am amazed at the level of expertise here on ATS

just by looking at one web quality photograph - the " ex-spurts " are happy to question the age and provenance of this discovery

bravo


who needs archeologists and digs and context and science

just ask ATS




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