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Pics of Earth from Moon - Which is real Nasa?

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posted on May, 3 2017 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Can you PM me if you do? I agree.




posted on May, 3 2017 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Exactly. Just like it does here. Some evenings it looks like it's sitting at the end of my street.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 03:51 PM
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I would guess number one, but they may all be fake. Our atmosphere actually magnifies the moon but I do not think the moon actually has an atmosphere at all that would magnify earth.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 03:52 PM
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I get it, lenses are different. But why? Why would they do this? Why zoom in JUST ON EARTH, and make it look closer or further away? Also, some are saying they have seen the sun and or moon rising and different sizes. Like the difference between the 1st and 2nd picture in the OP? I don't buy it. The 3rd image to me is what I picture it looking like from the surface of the moon.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: Tekaran
I get it, lenses are different. But why? Why would they do this? Why zoom in JUST ON EARTH, and make it look closer or further away?


For aesthetics.

All photographers do this. As a photographer-for-fun I invest a proportionally HUGE amount of time in not just framing when shooting but in cropping when editing. And most of my pictures are very ordinary, but I do it anyway.

There would be no end to the care I would show a picture in post if I worked with NASA-like photos of the Earth - and you bet I would do my best to frame it in the best possible way!
edit on 3-5-2017 by DupontDeux because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 04:22 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Can you PM me if you do? I agree.


Ditto to you. I mean it.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: Tekaran
I get it, lenses are different. But why? Why would they do this? Why zoom in JUST ON EARTH, and make it look closer or further away? Also, some are saying they have seen the sun and or moon rising and different sizes. Like the difference between the 1st and 2nd picture in the OP? I don't buy it. The 3rd image to me is what I picture it looking like from the surface of the moon.


Whether you are "buying it" or not doesnt change the fact that it's true one iota



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I would guess number one, but they may all be fake. Our atmosphere actually magnifies the moon but I do not think the moon actually has an atmosphere at all that would magnify earth.


The point is that the earths atmosphere acts like a lens.the various thicknesses the light travels through from sunrise go zenith emulating various lenses.

Just like the various lenses used on these missions



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: Tekaran
I get it, lenses are different. But why? Why would they do this? Why zoom in JUST ON EARTH, and make it look closer or further away? Also, some are saying they have seen the sun and or moon rising and different sizes. Like the difference between the 1st and 2nd picture in the OP? I don't buy it. The 3rd image to me is what I picture it looking like from the surface of the moon.


I'm going to assume you've never been to the moon, so what you think the earth looks like from the moon doesn't matter.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: Tekaran

Those photos look faker than this McDonalds cheese burger i'm eating.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: Tekaran

Have you heard of thing called a lens?

A lens is on a camera, its at the front, it focusses light onto the film. Yes film (on the moon). Do you know what photographic film is or have you grown up with digital cameras only?

A lens can have different focal lengths so that a long focal length lens zooms in to the image.

Now when you zoom in or zoom out this has the effect of adjusting the apparent relative sizes of objects in the field of view. So the Earth can go from very small to very big.

So I can make a distant object like the moon look bigger by using a zoom lens.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: yorkshirelad
a reply to: Tekaran

Have you heard of thing called a lens?

A lens is on a camera, its at the front, it focusses light onto the film. Yes film (on the moon). Do you know what photographic film is or have you grown up with digital cameras only?

A lens can have different focal lengths so that a long focal length lens zooms in to the image.

Now when you zoom in or zoom out this has the effect of adjusting the apparent relative sizes of objects in the field of view. So the Earth can go from very small to very big.

So I can make a distant object like the moon look bigger by using a zoom lens.


I, as a member, thank each and all for never letting this became mean.



VF



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: Tekaran
I get it, lenses are different. But why? Why would they do this? Why zoom in JUST ON EARTH, and make it look closer or further away?

Photographers and robotic spacecraft use different lenses because they want to achieve different things.

The first image is from a camera with short focal length (small zoom) because they used it for photographing the astronauts on the Moon, their equipment and the LM, as well as wide shots of the lunar terrain.

The second image comes from a spacecraft's Narrow Angle Camera (lots of zoom) because the spacecraft is orbiting the Moon many miles up, but needs to take high-resolution images with good detail. So, pointing that camera at Earth will result in disproportionately large-looking Earth.

Third picture has slightly more zoom than the first one, and was used to take pictures out of the Apollo spacecraft while in space.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: rickymouse
I would guess number one, but they may all be fake. Our atmosphere actually magnifies the moon but I do not think the moon actually has an atmosphere at all that would magnify earth.


The point is that the earths atmosphere acts like a lens.the various thicknesses the light travels through from sunrise go zenith emulating various lenses.

Just like the various lenses used on these missions


So, if they did use a lens, how come I can't recognize the land mass in the second photo when comparing it to pictures of land masses on the earth. I tried spinning the image many ways to compare it in my mind, it just does not seem to match anything I could find.

Ok, I found the angle, but some parts do not seem to match well. Could be the angle that causes the distortion though. I finally found one where the area is covered from a similar angle. I still think the second one is made up, it looks like some modified representations on the net.
edit on 3-5-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 11:32 PM
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Another "Looks kinda funny therefore fake" thread.

The three images are all genuine, and it is quite easy to verify this using the information in them.

The first one is from Apollo 17, and the image of Earth is absolutely correct for the time it was recorded as being taken in terms of the landmasses visible, its position in the lunar sky, the location of the terminator, and most importantly the unique time and date specific meteorological fingerprint shown by the clouds.

I've done quite a bit of work on this, as you can see here

onebigmonkey.com...

The third image in the OP is the famous Earthrise image taken by Apollo 8, and again it contains all the information you need to show that it is genuine, and in addition to the same details described above for the Apollo 17 image you can also add the details shown on the lunar surface and the position of the subsolar point.

onebigmonkey.com...

The lunar reconnaissance orbiter image is here

www.nasa.gov...

and it clearly sets out how the image was taken.

You could if you wanted to carry out some simple verification processes again with the data available from various weather satellites in Earth orbit to see if the pictures match up. You could also use software like World Wide Telescope or Celestia to see if the view is correct. You could also compare it with views of Earth taken by other countries such as China and Japan, or earlier probes such as the Lunar Orbiter probes from the 1960s.

I don't have time just now to do that, but I guarantee you that if instead of crying fake you actually took some time out to do some investigation work you'll find that the only reasons for the way the Earth appears in these photographs is the position of the observer and the camera used.

Sometimes it's also the way the image has been presented. For example these two images are the same, just cropped differently:

www.lpi.usra.edu...

images.spaceref.com...



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 03:05 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: rickymouse
I would guess number one, but they may all be fake. Our atmosphere actually magnifies the moon but I do not think the moon actually has an atmosphere at all that would magnify earth.


The point is that the earths atmosphere acts like a lens.the various thicknesses the light travels through from sunrise go zenith emulating various lenses.

Just like the various lenses used on these missions

Sorry, but I'll have to correct you on that. The atmosphere's thickness has no appreciable effect on the apparent size of the Moon or the Sun. You can verify that by taking photos of the Moon when it's high up or low on the horizon; the Moon will be the same size on both photos.

The Moon or the Sun only look bigger to us when low on the horizon due to an optical illusion.

The size of the Moon does vary slightly when seen from the ground, but only because of its slightly elliptical orbit, such as when we get "super moons".



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 03:14 AM
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a reply to: Tekaran

none are fake - please educate yourself on :

camera focal length

then all 3 pics make total sense



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 03:24 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: rickymouse
I would guess number one, but they may all be fake. Our atmosphere actually magnifies the moon but I do not think the moon actually has an atmosphere at all that would magnify earth.


The point is that the earths atmosphere acts like a lens.the various thicknesses the light travels through from sunrise go zenith emulating various lenses.

Just like the various lenses used on these missions


So, if they did use a lens, how come I can't recognize the land mass in the second photo when comparing it to pictures of land masses on the earth. I tried spinning the image many ways to compare it in my mind, it just does not seem to match anything I could find.

Ok, I found the angle, but some parts do not seem to match well. Could be the angle that causes the distortion though. I finally found one where the area is covered from a similar angle. I still think the second one is made up, it looks like some modified representations on the net.

You can't easily recognise Africa and the Arabian peninsula? I can see a bit of South America there too.

The image was taken by LRO spacecraft in Oct 12th 2015, when it was over the Compton crater. I plugged that information in Stellarium (a free planetarium software), and got this view of Earth as seen from the Moon:



The published image is somewhat "made up", because it's a composite of an image taken with a wide-angle camera and an image from a narrow-angle camera. NASA explained it in the article:

The high-resolution Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) on LRO takes black-and-white images, while the lower resolution Wide Angle Camera (WAC) takes color images, so you might wonder how we got a high-resolution picture of the Earth in color. Since the spacecraft, Earth, and moon are all in motion, we had to do some special processing to create an image that represents the view of the Earth and moon at one particular time. The final Earth image contains both WAC and NAC information. WAC provides the color, and the NAC provides high-resolution detail.

The two images they used are genuine images, but many here of course will cry "fake!" although there's nothing fake about using two or more real images to create a composite.

Here's one of the two original images they used:

WAC - wms.lroc.asu.edu...

NAC - wms.lroc.asu.edu... and wms.lroc.asu.edu...

By the way, the NAC camera is a telescopic camera with incredible resolution. Here's a full-scale crop from the resulting image (with colour from WAC), showing Egypt and the river Nile:


edit on 4-5-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 03:38 AM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

unfortunatly - ATS is actually near the pinnacle of " internet intelligence "



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 03:45 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: rickymouse
I would guess number one, but they may all be fake. Our atmosphere actually magnifies the moon but I do not think the moon actually has an atmosphere at all that would magnify earth.


The point is that the earths atmosphere acts like a lens.the various thicknesses the light travels through from sunrise go zenith emulating various lenses.

Just like the various lenses used on these missions

Sorry, but I'll have to correct you on that. The atmosphere's thickness has no appreciable effect on the apparent size of the Moon or the Sun. You can verify that by taking photos of the Moon when it's high up or low on the horizon; the Moon will be the same size on both photos.

The Moon or the Sun only look bigger to us when low on the horizon due to an optical illusion.

The size of the Moon does vary slightly when seen from the ground, but only because of its slightly elliptical orbit, such as when we get "super moons".


Yes as the moon rises it seems to get smaller. But you can use a ruler and see it doesnt. The moon just looks larger because your brain has something to compare it to. Now the moon will get larger and smaller but that is do to its distance
edit on 5/4/17 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)




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