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House Republicans Pass Bill to End Overtime Pay

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posted on May, 7 2017 @ 11:22 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: CB328
Making America suck again by taking away every opportunity and benefit from working people . . .


Isn't that who voted for him?

Will this hit home and make them wake up?



We had no other choice. Democrats couldn't come up with a clean candidate.




posted on May, 8 2017 @ 05:02 AM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

Yep, another law, another conservative principle out the door. Did Trump do that to conservatives?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: MOMof3
You know what a conservative principal is?? Granting citizens a right to choice. Be it insurance, or overtime compensation.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 01:41 PM
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See overtime pay is a scam actually. You get HEAVILY taxed on it. So in th elong run you are breaking even instead of coming out on top.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: TheRedneck

For myself and anyone else concerned; from the bill:

“(1) GENERAL RULE.—An employee may receive, in accordance with this subsection and in lieu of monetary overtime compensation, compensatory time off at a rate not less than one and one-half hours for each hour of employment for which overtime compensation is required by this section.




I don't see any issue with that, at all.

When I was a full-timer, we could only REPORT 40, and took the overtime as 'an hour' off in exchange. We didn't get paid overtime, nor did we get "an hour and a half" for each hour. No. That did not happen. Had it, it would have improved my life a lot.

But Kansas.

edit on 5/8/2017 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

I think what I am confused about, isn't there an exempt and non exempt status. This law must make exempt status moot. What would be the point of a salaried position if an employee can choose OT?



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

My understanding is that overtime is federal law and must be paid in excess of 40 hours per work week. Salaried employees are different, were you salaried? Most don't get any extra compensation for overtime, so anything above would be a perk.

I can see where this would not work so well and first hand where it would do wonders. It's all optional so that is a good thing.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 09:45 PM
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You are wrong again regarding salaried employees. Do yourself a favor and do some homework on a topic before spouting off BS. In several incidences OT pay can be awarded to salaried employees.


originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

My understanding is that overtime is federal law and must be paid in excess of 40 hours per work week. Salaried employees are different, were you salaried? Most don't get any extra compensation for overtime, so anything above would be a perk.

I can see where this would not work so well and first hand where it would do wonders. It's all optional so that is a good thing.



posted on May, 8 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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originally posted by: SeekingAlpha
You are wrong again regarding salaried employees. Do yourself a favor and do some homework on a topic before spouting off BS. In several incidences OT pay can be awarded to salaried employees.


originally posted by: JinMI
a reply to: BuzzyWigs

My understanding is that overtime is federal law and must be paid in excess of 40 hours per work week. Salaried employees are different, were you salaried? Most don't get any extra compensation for overtime, so anything above would be a perk.

I can see where this would not work so well and first hand where it would do wonders. It's all optional so that is a good thing.


The federal overtime provisions are contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Unless exempt, employees covered by the Act must receive overtime pay for hours worked over 40 in a workweek at a rate not less than time and one-half their regular rates of pay. There is no limit in the Act on the number of hours employees aged 16 and older may work in any workweek. The Act does not require overtime pay for work on Saturdays, Sundays, holidays, or regular days of rest, unless overtime is worked on such days.

www.dol.gov...

With few exceptions, to be exempt an employee must (a) be paid at least $23,600 per year ($455 per week), and (b) be paid on a salary basis, and also (c) perform exempt job duties. These requirements are outlined in the FLSA Regulations (promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor). Most employees must meet all three "tests" to be exempt.

Salary level test.

Employees who are paid less than $23,600 per year ($455 per week) are nonexempt. (Employees who earn more than $100,000 per year are almost certainly exempt.)

www.flsa.com...

I'm sorry....you were saying?

Instead of going through threads telling people to in effect, "get educated," perhaps you yourself should think before you post.

Or stop consulting Moby and the like?



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