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Stop sending your kids to college and stop going to college, Why the Economy Sucks Exhibit B

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posted on May, 2 2017 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: schuyler

Yeah I think it's still worth it only if

1.You are attending a cheap college to begin with

2. You are majoring only in something that gives you specialized skills that are in demand

3. Your college is in an area where you have access to summer internships that are in your field of study

If you want a degree in something you can learn just by beginning to work in that area, don't waste your time and money on college. I work in IT and it is very common for people to have no degree at all!




posted on May, 2 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I'm a QA tester who recently learned to code.

Wrote my first heavy duty automated testing tool last month.

When it was done I sat back and broke into a cold sweat as it dawned on me that I had just made myself several degrees more obsolete.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: olddognewtricks

Coders are the least safe.

Do they really think machines can't drag and drop???

They can already deep learn how to correct their own code. It's only a matter of time before they can use the internet as a resource for problem solving and drag drop the solution.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 11:18 AM
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This thread is pain staking, only because I feel like I am caught between a rock and hard place. I have been to college I have a lot of different units in Computer Science/Environmental Tech and Business Administration. I have not graduated from college but I do have enough units to get a Liberal arts degree. I have a lot of different types of field experiences in Hazardous Waste, Aluminum Manufacturing, Computer software/hardware troubleshooting, accounting, military and HVAC. I am forced to believe that I need to go back to school to get a Bachelors or a Masters to achieve an awesome dream job. I am fairing off ok, but I do find myself sharper than most in certain subject matters who go or have been to accredited schools to get a bachelors or masters. I have had jobs in different fields, and had to start from the bottom of minimum wage. Will I ever go back to school no. I might as well just ride the wave now. Tired of swimming back and forth against the currents.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks
a reply to: toysforadults

Education doesn't make you stupid, and not everyone wants to grow up to be a worker bee.

The benefits of higher education aren't all about finding a job.


Exactly higher education was set up for the love of higher wisdom, unfortunately somewhere along the blurred lines it became an over-priced debt machine for millions of brainwashed people.

Years ago when people wanted to learn something they got their experience hands-on, or apprenticed for a master somewhere with a small stipend paid to them to live on.

Something is very broke in our world, people accept stupid debt and misery for years to become many times more miserable, because they chose the wrong career, and now they are 100k plus or more in debt.

No wonder our society has people going postal every other day.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 07:01 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: olddognewtricks

Coders are the least safe.

Do they really think machines can't drag and drop???

They can already deep learn how to correct their own code. It's only a matter of time before they can use the internet as a resource for problem solving and drag drop the solution.


Programming is the safest job there is. It's what's eventually going to automate everything else. Once you automate programming, every other job will become automated soon after.

And coding isn't really about dragging and dropping. It's much more about alogrithmic design. USUALLY, code runs at a hit to machine efficiency in favor of making it more human readable. There does exist a few layers of abstraction though between coding and translating to machine language, where those efficiencies are reintroduced... to an extent.

You'll never get this from an early coding class (or atleast, from most of them), but in the upper levels of CS a lot of the problems simply cannot be googled. Solutions don't exist to the problems, they have to be derived.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 07:06 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah
Because sometimes it's not about money, but what the job offers you in those little daily experiences. I wouldn't encourage anyone to get into the tourism industry (hotels and the like) expecting to get rich. But it's a great way to expand your world view if you don't have the desire or ability to go out & explore the world yourself. My income wasn't all that great, but frankly, the reward of interacting with & learning from the foreigners vacationing here on a daily basis was well worth it, and thus to me was something that a fatter bank account can't rival.


That's fair. I think there's two types of jobs.

There's jobs you work for personal fulfillment. This is to stay busy, to accomplish a personal goal, maybe because the working conditions are interesting.

On the other hand are the jobs you work for financial fulfillment. This is where wage, or rather total compensation matters.

Given how many hours there are in the day, any job you choose to work, usually needs to involve an accepable intersection of those two types. To me a dream job is work where both of these things meet on the far end of the scale.

I do however stand by my statement that wages are largely a joke. They have no bearing on the value of the work done, or on how difficult the work is. It's more about percieved value and personal negotiating ability, and of course the cost of living differences in the US that make wages from on region totally incomparable to wages from another (which is another strike against the 100k milestone).



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 07:11 PM
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originally posted by: olddognewtricks
a reply to: schuyler

Yeah I think it's still worth it only if

1.You are attending a cheap college to begin with

2. You are majoring only in something that gives you specialized skills that are in demand

3. Your college is in an area where you have access to summer internships that are in your field of study

If you want a degree in something you can learn just by beginning to work in that area, don't waste your time and money on college. I work in IT and it is very common for people to have no degree at all!


I know the CS side more than the IT side (though I do have a couple small IT certs). CS and IT are both fields where people can self teach. On the CS side it generally means learning and then making some projects while on the IT side it involves certs. Speaking more of the CS side though, those projects don't amount to much. They're usually of pretty minor things, and worse... they can actively work against you if you fall into not writing clean code, something very common for most self taught people. There is a massive difference in CS work between self taught and formally taught. The way you code, the way you structure problems, reactions to data structures and algorithms, and most importantly teamwork. You can get a job without a degree, but right now there are 10 people out there with CS degrees applying, for every 1 qualified undegreed person. It's much harder to establish a work history, and it limits your career advancement.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: KonquestAbySS

I would finish if I were you.

If you have credits along a diverse range of topics, then chances are your gen ed's are out of the way, and you have at least the first year classes done for some fields too. So that should put you around 20? classes out. That's two years to finish.

Another thing you could consider is to try and take an Individual Studies degree with one or two minors (depending on classes you have finished), and then if you like the idea of Grad School, leveraging that into going for a Masters.

If you have any questions on CS, just shoot me a PM.

The best time to get a degree though, is now. It's never going to get easier.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Agree. What better way to control the masses than to dumb down education, encourage all to go to college, subsidize higher education with free-flowing and ever-increasing tax dollars, allow college faculty to politicize and indoctrinate students with liberal biases as part of their "education", beset youth with massive student debt, allow corporations to limit wages of Americans by using cheaper imported labor and sending American jobs abroad, allow increasing automation of jobs to the point of complete job obsolescence and unemployment (no ethics of employment considered), set ever- increasing taxes, allow corporations to see their top hierarchy and stockholders as most important and well-compensated ... All of these set the foundation for unbridled wealth and power of the top elite - at the expense of the middle class - and limiting house/property values (previously a major form of wealth for older Americans), and poor sustainability of Social Security system... If there is no longer a solid middle class base, how is social stability maintained ? We will be back to a feudal system.



posted on May, 3 2017 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: KonquestAbySS

And we will all continue our contest against the currents until people figure out better solutions to this problem.

People are going to have to get organized again. I think my children's generation is going to have no choice but to spontaneously organize into small economic collectives if they are going to get by and meet the challenges they will have to face. This current arrangement where we are all each on our own trying fend for our own selves inside the Machine is for the birds. It is just not working for the vast majority anymore.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 10:20 PM
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Professors' opinions are increasingly bought and sold. They have to publish to keep their jobs. The things they publish have to bring revenue.

One source of academic revenue is, of course, getting hired to help out with defense contracts. So you can't be publishing things that offend defense contractors to the point where they might threaten to withdraw those contracts.

Most defense contractors are self hating Christians, who like you to tell them how bad and rotten they are, so long as you admit they are doing some good in the process. It's not that you can't be critical at all. Just have to keep it within limits.
(It doesn't pay to publish papers pointing out how much the invasions totally fail to spread democracy, but rather make the people less open to it.)


In business and economics you have to publish things that say Globalization is a good thing, even if the arguments for it are mostly spurious, half evaluations that count the benefits without ever pointing out what is getting traded away for those benefits. (The "snowball effect" argument is my favorite, where selling an additional unit of an item after lowering the price of a good by using cheap foreign labor supposedly snowballs into 20 additional transactions --- but diminishing available demand, by moving the job overseas in a way that diminishes disposable income thereby lowering how many purchases the worker will make, doesn't snowball into an additional 20 lost transactions.)

It's all a big game of "Simon Says", where "Simon" is whoever is making enough money from the prevailing paradigm to be able to spread it around to the professors. If a paradigm isn't making anybody rich, it won't be taught.



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 10:22 PM
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In other words: these days college is just a very expensive and persuasive medium for advertising.



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