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Nearly a third of food samples in CFIA testing contain glyphosate residues

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posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 03:22 AM
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It is certainly dangerous, through multiple chemical pathways.

Check this paper:

Aluminum and Glyphosate Can Synergistically Induce Pineal Gland Pathology: Connection to Gut Dysbiosis and Neurological Disease

Agricultural Sciences 2015,,6,42-70

There are 30 pages packed with hard statistics showing increases in a wide range of illnesses in the US plotted against increased use of glyphosate in the US.

Also extensive discussion of key biochemical pathways by which glyphosate can cause illness in humans.

Monsanto have gone to a lot of trouble to get many papers scuttled, but the weight of evidence has become too great to ignore.




posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 10:11 AM
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There's an enlightening documentary on Amazon Video called "What's with Wheat" that goes in to a lot of the science and pharmacology behind Glyphosphate in our wheat and how, as it has slowly been incorporated into more and more of our diets and lifestyles (used in cosmetics etc), health problems have grown almost reciprocal.

To me, this totally answers the "WHY/HOW" of the rise in Autism/behavior and attention-based disorders that were non existent when I was young (70's & 80's) but so common now.



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

Heres where folks are uninformed. Its patented as an antibiotic, meaning as you know...it kills all microbial, bacterial life.

We all realize they add patents for extending proprietorship over a substance, however they must show efficacy. So spraying this crap all over soil and food is killing the very flora we require to live.

You are 90% bacterial cells, 10% human



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: TXRabbit

Here's an appendum to the Whats With Wheat documentary.
link



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 04:06 PM
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I've been in the farming industry, anyone who thinks a farmer actually reads (if they can read) the labels of the chemicals they are spraying, since monkey see monkey do with their buddies next door, are In for a rude awakening. They have supposed "scouts" usually paid or employed by the chemical company to check the farmers fields, then recommend to the farmer what conglomeration of chemicals to treat any deficiencies or pests. Hmmmm.

That farmer will shell out $$$ to apply these chemicals at rates recommended again by the "scout", and I'm sure 90% of the farmers never read the label. The Label is the information bible to that chemical.

You know when the instructions say add a teaspoon, but you add a tablespoon thinking the more there is the better it must perform? Well it's kinda like that in the farming industry.



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: 38181

Im a farmer
Only organic permaculture
Not the idiotic malarkey taking place all over tve world....its not the farmers fault..just the useless breeders



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 06:16 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: 38181

Im a farmer
Only organic permaculture
Not the idiotic malarkey taking place all over tve world....its not the farmers fault..just the useless breeders

Can I ask some questions?

How do you deal with weeds and insect pests?

Do you farm on a large scale?



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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Slightly off topic. I buy organic grass feed beef from a local farmer the next state over. He was telling me that this year for the first time since recent memory , the co-ops sold out of the heirloom seeds before the GMOs. He claimed that was due to a lot of farmers in the area realizing that the yields were identical to slightly better with the heirloom versus the GMO seeds during a good season. He said that during a excessively rainy/cold season, the heirlooms performed much better for yield.

It kind of gave me hope.



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: ClovenSky
Slightly off topic. I buy organic grass feed beef from a local farmer the next state over. He was telling me that this year for the first time since recent memory , the co-ops sold out of the heirloom seeds before the GMOs. He claimed that was due to a lot of farmers in the area realizing that the yields were identical to slightly better with the heirloom versus the GMO seeds during a good season. He said that during a excessively rainy/cold season, the heirlooms performed much better for yield.

It kind of gave me hope.


What are the GMO crops?

I think they are mainly corn, soybean, cotton, canola, sugarbeet, alfalfa, papaya and squash?



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 06:58 PM
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Don't forget Wheat, found in everything.
edit on 28-4-2017 by 38181 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

In this area it is mostly corn and soybeans. But he was talking specifically about corn in this case.



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 07:19 PM
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originally posted by: 38181


Don't forget Wheat, found in everything.

Wheat is not a GMO crop. Yet.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Its very difficult to mitigate weeds. We use the permaculture method, mostly native polyculture. Weeds act as camouflage to your food bearing plants so rabbits dont get as many.

We only farm 3 acres with two adults and a child to young to make much difference. We anchor the whole place with perennial trees, shrubs succoring hedges, all nut, berry or fruit bearing...many being medicinal as well. We have a very small pond where we grow lotus root blue flag, wapato and other tubers for food and medicine....bunches of frogs and toads have moved in.

We keep 25 chickens which helps soil and control bugs (as do the frogs) and provide near 23 eggs a day. Frankly, for us moles rabbits and vine boring insects are our greatest issues. To mitigate we use the polyculture mentioned above, vermaculture(worm castings)...raised beds lined with hardware cloth for seasonal annual veggies to keep out the moles and rabbit fencing around 3600ft for those beds to keep the rabbits out.

We utilize lasagna beds and other methods to better utilize water and do not need to irrigate to often. We use neem oil for insect pests and a knife for the vine borers.

By allowing all the natural occurring weeds to grow within our 3600ft of raised beds (both double dug and wood) it confuses the rabbits and other predators and we lose less yield. We simply mow winding paths which are attractive and functional...at least to us.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 08:14 AM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: D8Tee

Its very difficult to mitigate weeds. We use the permaculture method, mostly native polyculture. Weeds act as camouflage to your food bearing plants so rabbits dont get as many.

We only farm 3 acres with two adults and a child to young to make much difference. We anchor the whole place with perennial trees, shrubs succoring hedges, all nut, berry or fruit bearing...many being medicinal as well. We have a very small pond where we grow lotus root blue flag, wapato and other tubers for food and medicine....bunches of frogs and toads have moved in.

We keep 25 chickens which helps soil and control bugs (as do the frogs) and provide near 23 eggs a day. Frankly, for us moles rabbits and vine boring insects are our greatest issues. To mitigate we use the polyculture mentioned above, vermaculture(worm castings)...raised beds lined with hardware cloth for seasonal annual veggies to keep out the moles and rabbit fencing around 3600ft for those beds to keep the rabbits out.

We utilize lasagna beds and other methods to better utilize water and do not need to irrigate to often. We use neem oil for insect pests and a knife for the vine borers.

By allowing all the natural occurring weeds to grow within our 3600ft of raised beds (both double dug and wood) it confuses the rabbits and other predators and we lose less yield. We simply mow winding paths which are attractive and functional...at least to us.


That is fricken awesome. You are living my ideal life if I weren't so lazy. Those chicken eggs must taste divine. I bet you won't even be able to eat store bought eggs any more because they just don't compare. Spring is finally here and our farmers market should be starting up soon. I am getting pumped.

I like to dream that your lifestyle will be the wave of the future. Communities centered around growing, providing and building/making their own products. Healthy. I wonder how many of our physical ailments would just disappear in that type of environment?



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 08:29 AM
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Shame of it is this was all forced on farmers.
Either use Monsanto or get sued and go bust.
That's American freedom for you.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: ClovenSky

I agree with your ideal future, as does my family. Regarding the eggs? You better believe it! They free range plus we ferment table scraps and use only organic feed, yoks are dark orange. I cant go out to breakfast joints anymore regular eggs taste like tofu to me now.

And hey, we are all lazy...modern convenience has bred out of us that certain urgency our species used to require to survive from one day to the next. We fall far behind by the end of August, but the perennials keep growing and the animals are well fed as are we and every year we get a little closer to independence



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
Shame of it is this was all forced on farmers.
Either use Monsanto or get sued and go bust.
That's American freedom for you.


Farmers are not forced to use Monsanto under threat of lawsuit.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

Heres another point...it has been said we have 2-3 inches of topsoil left in the Western industrialized world. It takes something like 100 years under natural conditions to create 1 inch of topsoil. Tap roots of weeds like dandelion, poke root, plantain etc... pull nutrients from clay and minerals below up to the surface where, once they die back or get cut and laid over begin rebuilding soil.

Weeds arent the enemy, in fact the competition they bring bring stronger more vital food crops, not too mention all the weeds I just mentioned are excellent foods and medicines as well. I let dandelion go crazy, we live on the leaves in the spring, the roots in the fall along with other nutritious plants. We feed our animals their roots and make fritters from their flowers...

"Weeds" are wonderful.
Composting is essential as is small homestead farming and local living...our present system is finite and its terminus approaches ever faster.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: D8Tee

large scale mono-cropping kinda did make them buy Monsanto or similar due to cross pollination law suits. Another reason for small local poly/perma-culture homesteading and artisan guilds returning.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 04:18 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: D8Tee

large scale mono-cropping kinda did make them buy Monsanto or similar due to cross pollination law suits. Another reason for small local poly/perma-culture homesteading and artisan guilds returning.

Not that i like sticking up for Monsanto, but...

I don't agree with that.

Monsanto has not sued farmers for cross pollination.

I'm aware of the Saskatchewan case and am quite certain that it was a legal defence only, the farmer knew what he was doing.

If you have evidence they've done this in other cases I'd like to see it, as I'm not aware this has happened.
edit on 29-4-2017 by D8Tee because: (no reason given)




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