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Tattoo machines, rotary vs coil?

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posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 08:41 AM
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So what`s up folks?

I have been airbrushing for many years now, and i want to start tattooing, i have done maybe slevin pictures with my friends coil machine, but the vibration and the weight of the machine, is just not working for me, and the noise too, i am sensitive about loud noises..

So if you have any experience with these, i would appreciate some advice and opinions on this matter, i have not tried a rotary, because i do not know anyone who is using them.

Right now, i am gravitating towards the rotary, seems to be the future. (until some weird automated 3dspace laser printer is on the market)








posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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originally posted by: solve
So what`s up folks?

I have been airbrushing for many years now, and i want to start tattooing, i have done maybe slevin pictures with my friends coil machine, but the vibration and the weight of the machine, is just not working for me, and the noise too, i am sensitive about loud noises..

So if you have any experience with these, i would appreciate some advice and opinions on this matter, i have not tried a rotary, because i do not know anyone who is using them.

Right now, i am gravitating towards the rotary, seems to be the future. (until some weird automated 3dspace laser printer is on the market)






Get three cheap ones from amazon and give them a try. I think alot more depends on ability, rather than the tool.

The clackers get to me too.

edit on 03 23 2017 by blueyedevilwoman because: spelling



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 10:29 AM
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I use a coil for lining and color packing, and a rotary for shading. I like coils for having a bigger punch to them. Rotaries are nice for the consistency.
You can do damage with a rotary, literally. If your not careful you WILL tear someone up!!! So slow and steady...
Have you done any artwork using a pen? That would be the closest thing i can compare using a rotary to.
Try a couple cheap ones first, try both styles, (hybrid, full rotary) and see what you like. Rotaries can get expensive, up to 700-800. For a good mid-grade machine that will cost you you 150-250, i would recommend checking out FRICTION tattoo supply. I use a Friction Storm ($250) and it does what i need it too, and is reliable af.
The debate will rage on on which is better, coil or rotary. Its a question that can never be answered. EVERYTHING depends on the artist, and there style, as well as what theyre trying to achieve in their work. Hope this helps!

My selection of machines which includes a $7.00 machine (top right) that i added some fk irons coils to, as well as a heavier armature bar, and swapping the springs. My rotary is bottom left.

One of my favorite black and grey polka trash pieces done with my rotary.

edit on 27/4/2017 by Brian4real because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 10:36 AM
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They are both good, I use a coil machine to do line work, and a rotary for shading, but sometimes a coil shader is better for the job, so that's what I will use. All depends on the machine as well, if you buy cheap equipment it will show in your work.
Yes there is a difference between a 20 dollar machine from China and a 300 professional machine , and you need to know how to tune a coil machine as well.
There is a lot of information out there on both.
Then you need to know how to set it up properly so you don't jack up someone's skin and leave them with a scared up tattoo. I have been in the business for 20 years, so don't get frustrated if you don't get it right off the bat, and it is nothing like airbrush so don't think that you can make a tattoo machine do what you can make your airbrush do the first time you pick it up. ......good luck



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: Brian4real

Good post.



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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I do like my bishop rotary for doing softer stuff with no outline, but as stated above, if you are not careful you can make hamburger meat out of your canvas really quickly if you don't know what you are doing.
And then bishop will run you around 450 -500 bucks, but it's worth it.
edit on 27100000004 by JHumm because: afterthought



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: JHumm

Thank you!
For the OP: Try this place, here
Its a tattoo forum along with articles. Very informative!!!
Id also recommend checking out "tattoo machines and their secrets" you can find a copy in pdf format online (on behest of the copyright owners so not illegal). By far the most informative tattoo machine source book ive ever read.



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: Brian4real

Very helpful, thanks, i have a scar tattoo, that was made with a coil machine with no ink, done five years ago, so i know how brutal they can also be!


The friction storm sounds like an interesting machine..

Very nice work by the way, smooth.



posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: JHumm

Definitely need to throw some cash to this project, i almost quit airbrushing, when i first started painting, then i realized, how important a proper airbrush and compressor really is.

Thanks!



posted on May, 4 2017 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: JHumm

Ironically, i was looking at a Bishop for my next machine!
Good to know!



posted on May, 5 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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Rotary...

More even stroke for deposition the coil tech is spring board doorbell business that was based off of an electronic engraver pen the hit varies in depth sometimes 1 to 3 mm in variation and the springs wear so the depth starts varying even after go... which means without proper depth control and skin varying thickness in various locations, it really means there can be blow outs going into deeper layers of skin... so what happens is when the ink hits and spreads if one hits the fatty layer then say a 3 needle liner will all of a sudden look like a 14 round mag made the line.

Bad business... scratchers think that is how to actually pack color when it is going through the skin and into the fat which will then get into the blood stream.

But rotary that's my choice; even stroke and no bounce on the needle loop when saddled up.



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