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Testing Radiation Levels in Japan's Food Market [Video] 2017

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posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 09:53 AM
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Hey ATS...just saw this clip with a person randomly testing a sample area in what I do assume a Japanese food market....



The max reading the PM1704 - Spectroscopic Personal Radiation Detector this user read was at 0.31 µSv/h (microSieverts per hour).

I was doing a small amount of research, but am no physician on this matter, and after reading this article I did a small number crunch. But first...some background guidelines they provided:


Here are some basic numbers to use as a guide (μSv means microSieverts):

10 μSv – The average radiation you received today

40 μSv – The radiation you receive by taking a flight from New York to L.A.

100 μSv – The radiation you receive during a dental x-ray

800 μSv – Total radiation dose at Three-Mile Island for the duration of the accident

3,000 μSv – Radiation dose from a mammogram

3,600 μSv – Average radiation a US citizen receives in a year from all sources

50,000 μSv – Maximum allowable yearly occupational dose (USA)

100,000 μSv – Lowest yearly dose likely linked to increased cancer risk

2,000,000 μSv – Severe radiation poisoning (sometimes fatal)

Tokyo usually has a background radiation level of .04 μSv/h. On April 5, [2011] the level was .12 μSv/h. That’s more than double, but is it dangerous? The short answer is no. If we multiply .12 by the number of hours in a year (about 8766) we see that a Tokyo resident would receive about 1,052 μSv of radiation a year at current levels. That is about 2% of the amount that the USA allows workers to receive on the job, or about a third of the amount the average American receives per year from all sources.


So taking this and doing our own math....

0.31 x 8766 = 2629.74 μSv

To anyone who would like to help conclude the dosage received by the consumer from this product would be great and would add wonderful insight into what is going on in Japan and their radiation levels.

Cheers




posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 09:59 AM
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I've thought of taking some measurements at my local supermarket(in the United States) of some of the pacific sourced sea food.

Figured it would look a bit odd though. I would still need to be able to go there and get my groceries in the future.



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011


Here is a link to a radiation chart.
I find it interesting.

xkcd.com...

On a side note.
I read somewhere that grand central station is more radioactive than is allowed at a nuclear power plant. Something to do with the granite in its construction.
I'll try to find a link to that one.

Found it...

io9.gizmodo.com...

edit on 26-4-2017 by Bluntone22 because: Link



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 10:24 AM
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I need to get me one of those. I work with lasers and am wondering how much such daily close proximity of lasers is giving me



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock
I've thought of taking some measurements at my local supermarket(in the United States) of some of the pacific sourced sea food.

Figured it would look a bit odd though. I would still need to be able to go there and get my groceries in the future.


Why not just buy the seafood and measure it back at home before you cook/eat it ? Unless you don't eat sea food in which case it's a bit of a waste (not sure why you'd be concerned about radiation in sea food if you don't eat it though)



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

So radiation is safe for consumption I see.

No more mayo or mustard for me.

Can I get extra radiation on my triple burger deluxe?



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 11:00 AM
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originally posted by: Discotech

originally posted by: MisterSpock
I've thought of taking some measurements at my local supermarket(in the United States) of some of the pacific sourced sea food.

Figured it would look a bit odd though. I would still need to be able to go there and get my groceries in the future.


Why not just buy the seafood and measure it back at home before you cook/eat it ? Unless you don't eat sea food in which case it's a bit of a waste (not sure why you'd be concerned about radiation in sea food if you don't eat it though)


I don't eat seafood, but that is what I decided if I were to measure it. I'd just buy some "samples" of a few random things. The only thing I used to eat was tuna, canned. I haven't bought that in awhile.

Really though my reasoning was just more for personal knowledge or verification.



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: Skywatcher2011

Short video, not very 'scientific' approach to determining the hazard.

ANNND... this appears to be a segment from a news broadcast, that would make it NHK or some affiliate, NHK being owned by TEPCO now, so how biased is that?

Ill tell you, the alarm on the meter can be heard to be sounding, but that function is programmable for threshold,, and in this specific case, this particular display reading is .3 micro-sieverts, thats one third of one sievert, taken a few millimeters from a thin plastic covered tray of 'seafood' from(?) Japan.

Whats wrong wth this 'picture'? The short duration of the video, the mystery of the location of the seafood (what store) and the seafood itself (where caught), only one sample reading, thru plastic (which would block Alpha emissions).

More media cover up than anything. Or somebody trying to squash competition for seafood sales, who knows.

We are left going huh, what? As others have already shown, thats not a 'very' dangerous threshold level, even though there is no such thing as safe minimum dose.

If that seafood was contaminated with Alpha Emitters, that meter would not detect their presence, under those 'test' conditions.

edit on 26-4-2017 by intrptr because: sorry about the edits, clarity and spelling



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 12:20 PM
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A lot of bananas have radioactivity in them. It is radioactive potassium. I tested some I had one day and there was an increase, but the next time I tested them there wasn't hardly a change at all. I put a piece of charcoal near the stream of running water at the sink, and the charcoal absorbed the radon and it jumped up quite a bit. The type of radon we have is probably harmless. Hmmm. I am sort of bald though, but nobody else is in the house so I guess that isn't relevant..

I have not tested seaweed at all, but I would think that since there were numerous tests done on Islands in the past, it all would be a little contaminated. I guess that is why the bananas have radiation in them....at least that is what I read anyway. Knowing how misinterpretations work, I doubt if nuclear explosions had much of an effect on the bananas. When I mixed the salt and sand together in a bucket in the shed, the detector picked up radioactive activity there near the bucket. None of this was as much radiation as the dials on the baby ben or big ben clocks I have. I grew up with a big ben clock right next to my head on the nightstand when I slept, I used these alarm clocks for the first thirty five years of my life. Maybe that is why I do not have hair, my dad and brother were bald and they both slept next to the clock. Yeah, I guess I have been watching too much Sci-fi. That third eye I have is completely normal.



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 12:35 PM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock
I've thought of taking some measurements at my local supermarket(in the United States) of some of the pacific sourced sea food.

Figured it would look a bit odd though. I would still need to be able to go there and get my groceries in the future.


People have been doing what you said - I watched some videos of people finding shrimp or cod or something from Pacific ocean and measuring it. it registered for sure, I don't remember the readings thou.

stick with venison and dove, mmmmm



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 12:45 PM
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Unless the fish is caught near Fukushima, you're more likely to be poisoned with mercury than radioactivity.



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: Idreamofme
a reply to: Skywatcher2011

So radiation is safe for consumption I see.

No more mayo or mustard for me.

Can I get extra radiation on my triple burger deluxe?


I hope you don't eat spinach, or bananas, or live near granite rocks, or every other source of natural radioactivity...



posted on Apr, 26 2017 @ 11:12 PM
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Radiation is one thing, but radioactive particles are another. If the sea food had particles emitting radiation, and you ate those particles, then you are going to have those particles radiating inside you for a long time. Just getting a dose of radiation from an x-ray or what have you doesn't persist in your system, but the particles do.



posted on May, 2 2017 @ 09:21 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
A lot of bananas have radioactivity in them. It is radioactive potassium. I tested some I had one day and there was an increase, but the next time I tested them there wasn't hardly a change at all. I put a piece of charcoal near the stream of running water at the sink, and the charcoal absorbed the radon and it jumped up quite a bit. The type of radon we have is probably harmless. Hmmm. I am sort of bald though, but nobody else is in the house so I guess that isn't relevant..

I have not tested seaweed at all, but I would think that since there were numerous tests done on Islands in the past, it all would be a little contaminated. I guess that is why the bananas have radiation in them....at least that is what I read anyway. Knowing how misinterpretations work, I doubt if nuclear explosions had much of an effect on the bananas. When I mixed the salt and sand together in a bucket in the shed, the detector picked up radioactive activity there near the bucket. None of this was as much radiation as the dials on the baby ben or big ben clocks I have. I grew up with a big ben clock right next to my head on the nightstand when I slept, I used these alarm clocks for the first thirty five years of my life. Maybe that is why I do not have hair, my dad and brother were bald and they both slept next to the clock. Yeah, I guess I have been watching too much Sci-fi. That third eye I have is completely normal.


Nothing wrong with potassium radiation. Its normal and good for us. Its the other atoms that is bad for us specifically from nuclear plants are not potassium radiation.

hps.org...



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