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Higher sodium intake associated with lower blood pressure. You read that right

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posted on May, 11 2017 @ 11:51 PM
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originally posted by: Cofactor
a reply to: rickymouse



Good apple cider vinegar has malic acid in it, I take about a tablespoon in some water

There is probably a minute amount of malic acid in this. I use to take a couple caps of 800mg malic acid for a couple of days, then goes back to 1x 800mg each days. This is a chelator, so extended high dosage will deplete you of mineral, not just uric acid deposit. That is if you can tolerate it, combined with HCA (Garcinia cambogia) have given me chemical colitis in the past.

I'm not familiar with benzoic acid and would be worry of it since it is based on the aromatic and reactive benzene ring, and it is a preservative. We have many problem with food preservative.








When you eat cinnamon, it is metabolized to benzoic acid. Same with various fruits and berries. Too much is no good though. Some people have problems with benzoic acids, but for most they are a medicine. When you crave it, which should be once in a while. Sodium benzoate is a medicine, it is classified as a preservative, but is also classified as a medicine. It is effective for controling TB and other infections.

A little cinnamon accentuates the apple, think of why that would be, malic acid and cinnamon and sugar. Sugar is an adjuvant, it makes medicine more bioavailable. Salt does that for some medicines too. It is also an osmolyte. But sugar and salt have different uses in the body.




posted on May, 18 2017 @ 06:21 AM
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originally posted by: Ameilia
a reply to: seasonal

This isn't news mate. We already know it. This is why sodium is added to blood pressure meds, it safely increases their effectiveness.


Please specify which antihypertensive meds you are talking about or provide evidence for your statement so I can read it.

There are many studies out there that have found a link between sodium in certain drugs (not anti-hypertensives of course) and a higher risk of hypertension and stroke.

Association between cardiovascular events and sodium-containing effervescent, dispersible, and soluble drugs: nested case-control study - 2013

Sodium in drugs and hypertension - 2013



posted on Jun, 11 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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I have never liked alot of salt , i eat healthily, i do not like sweet things, especially chocolate. So healthy you would think.... wrong, diabetic , oesteo arthritus, hiatus hernia , heart attack 2 years ago, high cholesterol, eating healthy does not equal you being healthy . Just saying....



posted on Jun, 11 2017 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

I've eaten salt like a fiend my whole life. I've never had a blood pressure over 100/70 - usually I'm 90/60.

Not saying it's for everyone but it's not done me any harm at all.

peace



posted on Jun, 11 2017 @ 06:58 PM
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a reply to: gizzy44

I don't like chocolate at all. Nor sweets. I'm a sour type person.

I heard once chocolate was great for your heart. The real heavy on the cocoa kind.

I tried it and got my first migraine.

Never again.

Sorry you're health is not well.

Have you tried fruit/veggy smoothies?

peace



posted on Jun, 12 2017 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: silo13

I do drink alot of smoothies , i also grow my own fruit an veg , so i know they have no chemicals in them or on them . Thankyou for the advice though



posted on Jun, 13 2017 @ 07:43 AM
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originally posted by: gizzy44
so i know they have no chemicals in them or on them

That's quite the claim!



posted on Jun, 14 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: FatherLukeDuke

i grow from seed, dont spray or pellet , i use egg shells to deter slugs etc, also holly, as far as i know there are no chemicals on them.



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