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Where Did the Gods Go?

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posted on Apr, 27 2017 @ 03:21 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Sahabi

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Sahabi
a reply to: PuRe EnErGy

Looking for outward gods is the path of the exoteric,
while the esoteric was prescribed by Jesus:

"The Kingdom of God comes not with observation:
Neither shall they say, See here! or, see there!
For, behold, the Kingdom of God is within you."

- Luke 17:20-21





The Kingdom of God refers to the rule of God. Like a king has a kingdom (an area in which the king rules).

Although we are no longer ruled by royalty, the meaning of what Jesus said is quite clear and obvious; both to His original audience, and to us, today.

God, in Christianity is external and 'other' to us. Jesus was not saying you will find God by being introspective. He was saying that God's rule is internal to us and not external.


Hello my Brother chr0naut.

There is nothing wrong with your opinion and interpretation, for each being different, there are countless denominations, sects, churches, and interpretations based upon the Hebrew religion and teachings of Jesus.

I accept your opinion as valid, however, my subjective interpretation more aligns to my personal view of God and His Kingdom being within us.


• In John 10:30, Jesus says that he is one with the Father:
"I and my Father are one."


• John 17:20-21, speaks of the unity and oneness of devotees, of Jesus with God, and all being within:
"Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on me through their word; That they all may be one; as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that you have sent me."


• When considering that Jesus is within God and that God is within Jesus, in John 14:20, Jesus plainly tells us:
"At that day you shall know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you."


• Additionally, as God is Light (1 John 1:5), Jesus taught that we have this Light within us and should radiate it outwardly (Matthew 5:16):
- "God is Light; in Him there is no darkness at all."
- "Let your Light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in Heaven."


 


This is my Biblical argument for God being within us. I am well aware that you could quote many verses supporting your view, so I must accept your view as a valid and appropriate for you, with my view being appropriate for me. May Peace be with you!


Hi there,

I'm not exactly sure that I disagree with you but I was hoping to to say (rather ineptly, it would seem) that having the kingdom of Got apparent as an internal truth does not imply that you (or I, or anyone else) are God (or a 'part of God" as some may wish to believe, to dilute the offense).

We and God are separate. We may be a simulation within the mind of God and owe our every moment and expression to God but we definitely have our own individuality. This is the greatness of God, in that we can have individuality, that we aren't drones controlled by the greater and by the source.

So the indicators of God's supremacy in our life are internal to us. The fullness of God is beyond us.



I think that's what this means...

I mean... I could be wrong ... but, I guess it's just perspective





Blessed is he who has seen himself as a fourth one in heaven!

But Peter replied to these words and said, "Sometimes you urge us on to the kingdom of heaven, and then again you turn us back, Lord; sometimes you persuade and draw us to faith and promise us life, and then again you cast us forth from the kingdom of heaven."

But the Lord answered and said to us, "I have given you faith many times; moreover, I have revealed myself to you, James, and you (all) have not known me. Now again, I see you rejoicing many times; and when you are elated at the promise of life, are you yet sad, and do you grieve, when you are instructed in the kingdom? But you, through faith and knowledge, have received life. Therefore, disdain the rejection when you hear it, but when you hear the promise, rejoice the more. Verily, I say unto you, he who will receive life and believe in the kingdom will never leave it, not even if the Father wishes to banish him."




posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: PuRe EnErGy

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Sahabi

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: Sahabi
a reply to: PuRe EnErGy

Looking for outward gods is the path of the exoteric,
while the esoteric was prescribed by Jesus:

"The Kingdom of God comes not with observation:
Neither shall they say, See here! or, see there!
For, behold, the Kingdom of God is within you."

- Luke 17:20-21





The Kingdom of God refers to the rule of God. Like a king has a kingdom (an area in which the king rules).

Although we are no longer ruled by royalty, the meaning of what Jesus said is quite clear and obvious; both to His original audience, and to us, today.

God, in Christianity is external and 'other' to us. Jesus was not saying you will find God by being introspective. He was saying that God's rule is internal to us and not external.


Hello my Brother chr0naut.

There is nothing wrong with your opinion and interpretation, for each being different, there are countless denominations, sects, churches, and interpretations based upon the Hebrew religion and teachings of Jesus.

I accept your opinion as valid, however, my subjective interpretation more aligns to my personal view of God and His Kingdom being within us.


• In John 10:30, Jesus says that he is one with the Father:
"I and my Father are one."


• John 17:20-21, speaks of the unity and oneness of devotees, of Jesus with God, and all being within:
"Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on me through their word; That they all may be one; as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that you have sent me."


• When considering that Jesus is within God and that God is within Jesus, in John 14:20, Jesus plainly tells us:
"At that day you shall know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you."


• Additionally, as God is Light (1 John 1:5), Jesus taught that we have this Light within us and should radiate it outwardly (Matthew 5:16):
- "God is Light; in Him there is no darkness at all."
- "Let your Light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in Heaven."


 


This is my Biblical argument for God being within us. I am well aware that you could quote many verses supporting your view, so I must accept your view as a valid and appropriate for you, with my view being appropriate for me. May Peace be with you!


Hi there,

I'm not exactly sure that I disagree with you but I was hoping to to say (rather ineptly, it would seem) that having the kingdom of Got apparent as an internal truth does not imply that you (or I, or anyone else) are God (or a 'part of God" as some may wish to believe, to dilute the offense).

We and God are separate. We may be a simulation within the mind of God and owe our every moment and expression to God but we definitely have our own individuality. This is the greatness of God, in that we can have individuality, that we aren't drones controlled by the greater and by the source.

So the indicators of God's supremacy in our life are internal to us. The fullness of God is beyond us.



I think that's what this means...

I mean... I could be wrong ... but, I guess it's just perspective





Blessed is he who has seen himself as a fourth one in heaven!

But Peter replied to these words and said, "Sometimes you urge us on to the kingdom of heaven, and then again you turn us back, Lord; sometimes you persuade and draw us to faith and promise us life, and then again you cast us forth from the kingdom of heaven."

But the Lord answered and said to us, "I have given you faith many times; moreover, I have revealed myself to you, James, and you (all) have not known me. Now again, I see you rejoicing many times; and when you are elated at the promise of life, are you yet sad, and do you grieve, when you are instructed in the kingdom? But you, through faith and knowledge, have received life. Therefore, disdain the rejection when you hear it, but when you hear the promise, rejoice the more. Verily, I say unto you, he who will receive life and believe in the kingdom will never leave it, not even if the Father wishes to banish him."


The Apocryphon of James, from which you took your last quote, was most likely written 200 years after Christ and is regarded as having a Gnostic heritage (evidenced in the language of the text and its use of specifically Gnostic terms, like "fullness" being a way to salvation). It isn't canon and does not integrate well with canonical scripture in a philosophical sense.

The only ancient copy of the Apocryphon of James is from the Jung Codex scroll found at Nag Hammadi. It was written in Coptic but the text contains clues that it had been translated from Greek. The text says that it was originally written in Hebrew but, barring a few Jewish nouns, does not appear to have a Hebrew pedigree.

The Apocryphon of James also gets many of its dateable events wrong. For instance it says that the dialogue between Jesus, Peter and James supposedly occurred 550 days after Jesus death but several other sources, including the canonical texts, say that Jesus ascended 40 days after his death and no longer appeared to the disciples.

James, the brother of Jesus, who is attributed to be the author of the text, died by stoning in 62 AD, significantly before the authorship of the Apocryphon of James.

Despite the interesting (and often self-contradictory) exposition it contains, and its integration into Gnostic thought, the Apocryphon of James is clearly a post-Christian fabrication and it does not contain the actual words of Jesus, Peter or James.



posted on Apr, 28 2017 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: PuRe EnErGy

"The Gods" were angels called "watchers".

They and their off-spring reeked havoc on the earth leading to the "great flood".

After the flood, Nimrod defied the Father. Languages were confused and people spread out across the continents. That is why the so called "pantheon gods" are generally the same. They sprang out of Babylon.


Where did they go?

Yahuwah punished The Watchers for their sin against mankind. Yahuwah had The Watchers buried somewhere within the valleys of the earth bound fast. The Watchers are buried for 70 generations.



posted on Apr, 29 2017 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: PuRe EnErGy

Here's a theory.

In ancient times, the world was a thriving Metropolis much like today. It's possible that stories of Atlantis came from this.

War broke out, technology was hidden and millions died. Nothing was left afterwards, save demolished cities destroyed architecture. The next Generations that came after, heard these stories, but that's all they were to them now, just stories.

Meanwhile, those who ruled before, having hidden themselves underground, still had the technology available thus, became as Gods to those who did not remember. People died early due to lack of technology amongst other things. So upon seeing these sky gods, believed what their Lords would have told them. Much like people believe what their Governments tell them today.

Now due to technological advancement, we can see how easy it is to trick the mind. And most don't fall for it anymore.



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