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52 percent energy yield from cow dung fermentation

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posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 04:14 PM
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I have seen a few technologies that allow natural gas to provide household energy. A favorite is a nearly zero emission box that is installed in your back yard by whoever your provider/developer is that is fed natural gas. This gas is then used to fuel a generator that captures and recombusts emissions.

You get a slightly more efficient use of energy, but using an electric stove really sucks.

I wonder if the idea of having individual power plants would catch on? I would personally prefer that as it would lower the long term costs (presuming it didn't break all the time). I don't even limit the idea to natural gas. Although I think capturing and refining it is likely a better idea as our current waste begins to release it.




posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

We do recycling containers and composting, though I'm admittedly still learning with my own composting. My 1st container is way too big and way too full, which makes it hard to mix. I suspect that a lot of it isn't breaking down fast enough. So I'm working on 2 more DIY containers so I can thin it out & give it more room to breathe.

a reply to: BuzzyWigs

I wish I could say we don't use any inorganic things but I still use this one mosquito spray in the lawn & non-fruit trees. I think it's the type of composted manure we get, but that crap (pun intended) always seems to be infested with mosquitoes. Every 2 weeks or so, my nephew (and sometimes his sisters) come over and I finished with having them get bit up. And I had to declare war on stinkbugs last year because they swarmed & killed my Mom's squash plants, cucumber plants, and watermelon vines.

I'm torn now on organic vs results. Almost all of our stuff is organic, but I'm personally not really growing stuff for that reason. I've been running all kinds of experiments on how to grow various things, companion crops for other crops, etc and simply want results. My main purpose is to reteach people how to have their own productive food supplies at home, be it in an apartment or a full lawn. But at the same time, there's no point growing a ton of food if it has no nutrients, is covered in poisons, and kills off all of the bees and other pollinators. I also have a personal grudge w/Monsanto so I hate all of their products regardless of how they fit into my equation. Trying to find a balance sucks. lol
edit on 21-4-2017 by enlightenedservant because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 06:47 PM
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"Who run Bartertown? Who... run... Bartertown?"
Anyway good news!



posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: galien8

I was wondering because I saw this in an article not too long ago:



A commercial farm in Kenya has become Africa's first electricity producer powered by biogas to sell surplus electricity to the national grid, cutting the carbon emissions associated with oil-powered generation.

The Gorge Farm Energy Park in Naivasha produces 2 megawatts (MW) of electricity - more than enough to cultivate its 706 hectares (1,740 acres) of vegetables and flowers, and with sufficient surplus to meet the power needs of 5,000-6,000 rural homes.



The plant produces biogas through anaerobic digestion, a process in which crop residue from the farm is digested by micro-organisms. The biogas produced is burned in two engines, producing both electricity and heat in a process called cogeneration.

Producing the same amount of energy using diesel would require 5 million litres of fuel annually, Nolan explained, plus the extra fuel required to transport the diesel inland from the port of Mombasa.

Africa's First Grid-Connected Biogas Plant Powers Up

From the way they described it, it seems like they simply captured the gas that came off of the crop waste as it was being composted. It made me wonder if we could eventually have small gas "catchers" coming off of at-home compost piles, which would create our own biogas. Then again, it also sounds a lot like part of the process of making alcohol, since it's letting the organic matter break down and then capturing the flammable gases that come off it. So I don't know if they'd allow this at home.



posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Exactly!! Our 'raised garden bed' experiment that took the place of the diseased elm that died 10 years ago never did grow anything very well.

We are under black walnuts, also. Had the trees trimmed by an arborist, and thought I'd have more "full sun." But no.
The other trees just moved into the empty canopy space.



posted on Apr, 22 2017 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

#nicholastesla

Which begs the question if they suppress technology when do we see a change for the better
edit on 22-4-2017 by Sillyosaurus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2017 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

en.wikipedia.org...

with this technology we can generate enough energy to give 99% coverage of world energy demand (numbers from 1996)

if all organic waste (agriculture, life stock manure, household waste etc.) is used as the feed


edit on 2017-4-22 by galien8 because: extra info



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