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The Executive Air Affair

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posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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Introduction

I was searching for some information about a certain rumored classified aircraft, and (as can sometimes happen) I fell down a small rabbit hole. Or maybe more of a rabbit slight indentation. So, what I ended up reading was a chapter on google books by an author by the name of Dr Robert Ing. The book is called "Chatter Beyond the Fringe", and is a sort of "case book" from the career of the author.

The Author

Maybe a little bit about the author first. Dr Robert Ing is a "technical security privateer who has traveled the world with letters of marque from governments and major corporations". He has written quite a few articles, and books. Some of them about the technical securty topics, and also quite a few on occult subjects. Fancy that! He has apparently also have made an appearance on several TV channels over the years, according to his web page here.

The Incident

The "case" that I stumbled across is the third such case from the book, which deals with an incident that happened aboard a Executive Jet that was flying a CEO (President) for a "major US defence contractor" from Metropolitan International Airport in Denver to an undisclosed location. The year and date is also not given, but the book was published in 2007 so it has to be prior to that.

The author was allegedly charged with techical security on the executive jet (A Cessna Citation) and did sweeps for various bugs and other threats aboard. The aircraft, also allegedly, was additionally equipped with some pretty sophisticated elecronic countermeasures and other equipment not standard on a private jet. Among them an ADVIS (Airborne Digital Video Imaging Security) system, consisting of "two computer guided Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) digital cameras mounted one on the forecastle (lower front) of the fuselage and one on the aft quarter deck"(page 67).



I checked this alleged ADVIS system and came up with just one reference to such a system in a few scholarly articles. The purpose is to provide visual identification of aircraft to supplement Transponder codes and other means of identification. I don't know if such a system is feasible, or exists, but it certainly seems plausible. Maybe someone with some knowledge can evaluate?

Curiously the author also relates that this flight "warranted a Shadow Escort" (page 66), of (presumably) military jets, and that these would depart from a different airport and shadow the flight within visual range. One in front and one in the rear, at different altitudes from the executive jet itself. Now, this raises some flags for me, because I was not aware that this level of security was provided to private citizens, no matter which company they might belong to. Maybe some more knowledgable in the field can comment on this?

Anyway, shortly after take off (about 10 minutes), the author is roused from sleep by the Executive Officer and taken to the cockpit where he is advised that the plane has lost all communications and also that navigation is offline after the appearance of a unknown aircraft flying paralell to the plane at an estimated distance of 6 miles and about 2000 feet above the plane (page 67). The plane is at about 7000 feet at this time (page 66).

The plane is not part of the shadow escort, which is about 9 minutes out, and the ADVIS system cannot identify it but calculates it to be about 269 feet in diameter. It is greyish green in colour and has no identification markings and no discernable cockpit. The unknown aircraft leaves a contrail (streak), or something similar coming out of it, and is "a disc of some sort" (page 68) which proceeds to go into a curved trajectory in front of the executive jet and "disappear in a flash of light leaving a contrail" (page 68-69).

Comms and navigation then returns, and the pilot notifies the nearest airport to file a report with the aviation administration. The rest of the four hour flight is uneventful, but upon landing the crew is debriefed extensively by airforce personell (from Air Special Investigations Unit) which swear them to secrecy with reference to the Official Secrets Act (page 70).

According to Wikipedia only the UK still has this law, whereas Canada had it until 2001. So this might be Canadians? Or US personell referring to a foreign law? Again a few flags raised?

So this is a curious tale, indeed. But there is more.

The author then claims that he a few years later discovered, in a bookstore in Washington D.C., in a "Conspiracy book" redacted FOIA documents related to this incident, published in a book and even on the backcover of it (page 71). He finds his own report there, redacted, and also finds out from the report that the ADVIS system of the corporate jet had estimated the size of the unknown aircraft to be 269,4 feet in length and 58,7 feet in height (page 72). Naturally, it is remarked that it is pretty large for a stealth plane which was seemingly also very agile.

Conclusions?

I don't know what to make of this. Is this fiction, or is there any way to verify this account? Has anybody heard anything about this before?

Relevant Links

The source book on google books

The source book on amazon

The authors website

So, what does ATS think about it all? I am posting this in the UFO forum because this is certainly an unknown flying object, but I am secretly hoping that some of the regulars in the aircraft forum can chip in as well because there really is a lot of strange things here, which I certainly lack the knowledge to evaluate. If it should properly be moved to another forum, (including I admit possibly the hoax bin), some moderator can move it perhaps.

BT
edit on 20-4-2017 by beetee because: Tidying up

edit on 20-4-2017 by beetee because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-4-2017 by beetee because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: beetee



was flying a CEO (President) for a "major US defence contractor


Spidey sense tingles
who was on the jet ?
Why did the UFO choose that plane ?


edit on 20-4-2017 by kibric because: boo



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: beetee

Excellent thread, this is what makes this site great! Thanks for the wonderful addition.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: beetee

Dbl.
edit on 20-4-2017 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 05:10 PM
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interesting stuff - like an x-files storyline. s & f



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: kibric

Hehe. Well the company is given as the "RKR Corporation", which I assume is a pseudonym, and said to be an international telecommunications company as well as one of the US top 100 corporations. And a major defence contractor.

I guess that narrows it down some :-)

BT
edit on 20-4-2017 by beetee because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: beetee

maybe raytheon or somesuch



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:15 PM
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Just one question so far, the 7000 feet bit. Yes, I know that there is a height limit in congested skies and all that, but this aircraft is fast and furious, and they cruise at a high ceiling, (max 51000feet) the quicker they get there is part of that aircraft's rationale, so why were they puttering around at 7000 feet ten minutes after take-off.
edit on 20-4-2017 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:19 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Well, maybe this is inaccurate. The story is that the author settles down for a nap after the plane kevels out at 7000 feet. He then gives no more altitude info, but is woken up about 10 minuts into his nap.

I guess the plane could have changed altitude in that time.

Good point. It's details like this that can help us evaluate the story.

BT



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:36 PM
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if the plane was at 7000ft it was either shortly after takeoff or during the approach. I'm assuming the first (if the flight continued for 4 more hours like stated) but something is telling that this is a hoax.


edit on 20-4-2017 by KiwiNite because: edit: nvmd just noticed it was shortly after takeoff. I should take some sleep



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: KiwiNite

Yes, well there are other things as well that raise flags, but the altitude is 7000 feet shortly after take off, the author falls asleep, and is woken up after a short while to see the "unknown aircraft".

We don't have the actual altitude for the encounter.

I am a bit baffled that it is the altitude that raise the biggest flag, though, and not the alleged "shadow escort" or capabilities of this coroprate Cessna.

You guys have no issue with either of those?

BT



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:48 PM
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I am also curious to know if anyone has seen any "Conspiracy book" where this encounter is featured, and even prominently on the back cover?

If we can't find someone who has seen it on this site, I guess we can safely assume there is no such book :-)

BT



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: beetee

It's usually the small stuff that trips people up. First, there is not, and never has been, a Metropolitan International Airport in Denver. The primary Denver airport at that time was Stapleton Airport. Also, If it was 10 minutes after takeoff, a Citation would have been far higher than 7,000 feet. Hell, in Denver you start at 5,400 feet. In 10 minutes I would expect to be at at least21,000 feet. And you would never cruise at 7,000 feet in a Citation. The minimum legal IFR altitudes in the Denver area are 8,000 feet to the north, 15,000 to the west, 9,000 to the South, and 8,500 to the East. And aircraft don't have an "executive officer." Squadrons do, and big Navy boats do. There's more, but that's enough to leave a bad smell about the story.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 06:59 PM
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originally posted by: beetee
a reply to: kibric

Hehe. Well the company is given as the "RKR Corporation", which I assume is a pseudonym, and said to be an international telecommunications company as well as one of the US top 100 corporations. And a major defence contractor.

I guess that narrows it down some :-)

BT

Surely these details are easily checkable?

Sorry but im busy playing poker so im not into doing it



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 07:02 PM
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More reading needed I think. but this story has been copied,
occupyilluminati.com...

I will add, I think it's all a bit nutty. While it does say in the story print literally, Robert Ing, DSc, DLitt, FAPSc the link/s headings (I found another) says Dr. Robert Ing. however DSc, DLitt, FAPSc is not what to expect in titling, a full stop after the D, as in D.Sc. , or D.Litt. would be, and FAPSc could well be munching melons in Florida..sort of.
I can't find a proper reference to Ing in the given 'The Guardian' accolade either other than the 'Sherlock Holmes' phrase simile which is about something else altogether.

I will allow Mr Ing to give advice on making Runes for under $10 though...they might work.

edit on 20-4-2017 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: beetee

The good doctor, (MD or PhD?) doesn't give any background material on where he gained his knowledge of his business. No school(s) that enabled the "DR" claim nor prior work in industry or government. So I'm calling hogwash on the whole episode of Dr. Ing from start to finish.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 07:35 PM
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On top of the altitude issues already brought up, you wouldn't get a military escort like that as a civilian.

Hell, even small jets full of mixed military brass don't.

And then there's the matter of the 'Air Special Investigations Unit', I've never heard AFOSI referred to that way, and there IS no Official Secrets Act. Even if they were Canadian, AFOSI couldn't swear them to secrecy using a Canadian law.

However, I've heard a lot of people who think WE have one refer to the US' 'official secrets act', but they're just confused. I think it's pretty hinky, tbh.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 07:47 PM
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originally posted by: Aliensun
So I'm calling hogwash on the whole episode of Dr. Ing from start to finish.


Well, he sort of got his 'DSc' the way Bearden, Hulda Clark and Begich got theirs - a diploma mill.

It's a time-honored method. Plop down a few hundred bucks and get your sheepskin.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 07:54 PM
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originally posted by: SecretKnowledge

originally posted by: beetee
a reply to: kibric

Hehe. Well the company is given as the "RKR Corporation", which I assume is a pseudonym, and said to be an international telecommunications company as well as one of the US top 100 corporations. And a major defence contractor.

I guess that narrows it down some :-)

BT

Surely these details are easily checkable?

Sorry but im busy playing poker so im not into doing it


I'm not playing poker and there is not much else to do on a layover in Kinshasa, so I checked. There is an RKR Corporation in Denver. It is a small plumbing supply company and most certainly is not a "top 100" US corp. The FAA has no record of a Citation being registered in the RKR name. I'm calling BS on the whole story.



posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 01:42 AM
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Thank you all for chipping in. I too think there whole affair is starting to smell, and it is not a whiff of roses I fear.

There is the FL at 7000 feet (although not claimed)
There is the military "shadow escort" of an civillian
There is the absence of the alleged FOIA documents
There is the AFOSI weirdly referenced Air Force Special Investigations.
There is the Official Secrets Act reference.
There is the fact that nobody else has ever heard as much as a squeak about this before.
There are also other things in the story that makes one squirm a bit, as for instance the former Green Beret that is now a security guard.

The ADVIS system is also a bit suspect, in my view, because why would you want one on a civilian jet with no offensive capability?

There is also the credibility of the author, which I am not too certain about either.

To sum up, if nobody can come up with a good reason not to, I think we are slowly heading for fiction here.

What is strange, however, is that anyone would make up a story like this where there are details that can be checked and not get them right.

It is quite the outrageous claim, in the first place, so if you publish it in a book why embellish with details that are blatantly false?

BT



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