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Study Reveals That a Strange Force Is Affecting the Quantum World

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posted on Apr, 19 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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Force in a Vacuum

The world of nanoparticles can be very different from the world we see. For starters, it’s already unique in terms of mass — these objects are tiny — but more than that, the nano world is governed by a different set of physical laws, which we have taken to calling quantum physics. Many of the interactions that take place in this nano realm can be difficult to spot, and one such elusive phenomenon is the subject of a study by an international team of researchers led by Alejandro Manjavacas, assistant professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of New Mexico (UNM).

In a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers observed what’s known as the Casimir effect, a force found between quantum objects inside a vacuum due to fluctuations of electromagnetic waves. When viewed through the paradigm of classical physics, the force can’t be seen. Researchers have to apply quantum field theory to spot it.
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futurism.com...

This mysterious "Casimir effect" only occurs "when viewed through the paradigm of classical physics." only when the quantum field theory is applied can researchers see this effect.




Casimir Effect

But this is not the only discovery that caught my attention which could rewrite our current understanding of particle physics, and quantum physics.

Recently the LHC found also an intriguing anomaly.


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The experiment found that some particles decay less often than expected under a particular set of circumstances, and researchers are now working to determine if this is sign of new physics phenomena, or simply a statistical error.
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In the Standard Model, this property predicts that 'up to a small and calculable effect due to the mass difference, electron and muons should be produced with the same probability in this specific B0 decay.’

But, in the LHCb experiment, the researchers found that decays involving muons were less frequent.
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The Large Hadron Collider finds 'intriguing anomalies' that could rewrite the rules of physics

The second anomaly that regards the decay of muons still has to be verified. I would like to know exactly what "sets of circumstances" caused the decay of muons to be less frequent.


...The anomaly was detected in the entire data sample from the Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider, and if seen in the data from Run 2, it could suggest physics beyond the Standard Model.
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www.dailymail.co.uk...




edit on 19-4-2017 by ElectricUniverse because: correct excerpt.




posted on Apr, 19 2017 @ 10:07 PM
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Does this have anything to do with dark matter?



posted on Apr, 19 2017 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

The physics is beyond me so I'm just going be cheeky to say its Mandela's fault

S & F



posted on Apr, 19 2017 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

This looks eerily similar to the double layering effects being studied by the Saphire project.

Though the Saphire project is a completely different study.
edit on 19-4-2017 by Bobaganoosh because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2017 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: Bobaganoosh

I think people need to spend a little more time on understanding the katchina if they are going to look through the quantum physics lens at things that have to do with that odd thing called reality.

This was solved a long time ago, then was solved again a lot less time ago and then solved again 70 years ago and now we can't figure it out again?

/facepalm



posted on Apr, 19 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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The Casimir effect has been measured between plates, as the diagram portrays, some time ago.

This is a bit different.. a spinning atom produces a lateral force, to move along a plate. The direction is changed by the distance between atom and plate.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

What is the point of mentioning two unrelated experiments in one post?

As for the LHCb experiment. I'd say let's wait until the results are confirmed in the second run.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 01:31 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

I'd say this is proof that they really don't understand quantum physics, even as much as they think they might. Spooky stuff, indeed, lol! Perhaps it's simply that what they expected was wrong, and the results are just as they should be.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: moebius

They are two anomalies, instead of creating separate threads i added them together, and emphasized these are separate anomalies. Also explained that the second one had to be verified. It still worth it as news.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 03:10 AM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse

The world of nanoparticles can be very different from the world we see. For starters, it’s already unique in terms of mass — these objects are tiny — but more than that, the nano world is governed by a different set of physical laws, which we have taken to calling quantum physics.


Or maybe the the nano world is governed by the same exact set of physical laws, but because of the scale of it all it is observed differently, and scientists are just idiots.
edit on 20-4-2017 by anonfamily because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 04:01 AM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
a reply to: moebius

They are two anomalies, instead of creating separate threads i added them together, and emphasized these are separate anomalies. Also explained that the second one had to be verified. It still worth it as news.


I would have done the same thing... There are always nit pickers that no matter what they try to find fault.



posted on Apr, 20 2017 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
This mysterious "Casimir effect" only occurs "when viewed through the paradigm of classical physics." only when the quantum field theory is applied can researchers see this effect.
Seems like you contradict yourself here since you reference only occurs "when viewed through the paradigm of classical physics."and "only when the quantum field theory is applied" because classical physics and quantum field theory are two different things so how can it be "only" both of them? According to this paper Casimir forces are quantum forces and don't require "viewing through the paradigm of classical physics".

The Casimir Effect

Casimir effects can be formulated and Casimir forces can be computed without reference to zero point energies. They are relativistic, quantum forces between charges and currents.


The muon decay discrepancy is interesting but I wouldn't go trying to rewrite the standard model until they have more data. Some theoretical physicists probably already are re-writing it or have re-written it, that's what they do, but still the additional data is needed to confirm any revisions and there have been other anomalies reported before that turned out to not be so anomalous when more data was collected.



posted on Apr, 21 2017 @ 04:58 AM
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originally posted by: AutonomousMeatPuppet
The Casimir effect has been measured between plates, as the diagram portrays, some time ago.

This is a bit different.. a spinning atom produces a lateral force, to move along a plate. The direction is changed by the distance between atom and plate.


So are you suggesting it is the atoms that make up the plates that are causing this affect? I'm leaning toward this, has that been ruled out? I think they are saying yes. We need more data.



posted on Apr, 24 2017 @ 07:30 PM
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originally posted by: AutonomousMeatPuppet
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This is a bit different.. a spinning atom produces a lateral force, to move along a plate. The direction is changed by the distance between atom and plate.


Yes, you are right. Manjavacas states this in the article.


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Manjavacas believes that the knowledge gained from his team’s research, such as the discovery that the lateral Casimir force’s direction can be controlled by changing the distance of a particle to a surface, can help nanotech engineers design better nanoscale objects for computing, healthcare, and other applicable areas of research.
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futurism.com...



posted on Apr, 24 2017 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

They're part of the same observations so yeah they belong together,

LHCb is doing a controlled beta decay. Those are the "special conditions" glided over. The new run should add data readings to discern between special conditions and not so constrained conditions.

This run should be exciting!!

They start in May!




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