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What is the name for a person that receives donations?

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posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Naturallywired

A charity




posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: Naturallywired
Maybe precipitant?

Definitely not precipitant.

To specifically reference a donation, a donee is a person that receives a gift so that would be the correct word to specify that they are receiving a donation.

A recipient is a person that receives something, not exclusive to a donation, so that also works.

Beneficiary technically works but has a totally different connotation than the intent here.

And I have no idea where you saw "don-lee" but that doesn't appear to be a word at all and searching for it along with 'definition' returns nothing.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: Naturallywired

Nope. I do not agree. He who "receives" anything...is the "recipient" of it. Ive never..ever in fact heard the usage of "Don-ee". Ever. Anywhere in over 50 years. Sorry.

English? Its "recipient".



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:13 PM
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Heir
Recipient
Assignee
Devisee
Donee
Legatee
Awardee
Conferree




posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: EternalShadow

Badass!

Please don't correct my slang.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: EternalShadow
Several of those words have specific legal meanings that do not work in relation to giving someone a donation.

An assignee is "A person to whom a right or liability is legally transferred" so that doesn't work in regards to donations.

A devisee is someone that receives something because they were left it in a will.

A legatee is someone that receives a legacy, also specifically in regards to wills and not donations.

An awardee is in regards to receiving an award. Unless the donation is an award this doesn't really work either.

A conferee is in regards to anything so that one does work.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents
a reply to: EternalShadow
Several of those words have specific legal meanings that do not work in relation to giving someone a donation.

An assignee is "A person to whom a right or liability is legally transferred" so that doesn't work in regards to donations.

A devisee is someone that receives something because they were left it in a will.

A legatee is someone that receives a legacy, also specifically in regards to wills and not donations.

An awardee is in regards to receiving an award. Unless the donation is an award this doesn't really work either.

A conferee is in regards to anything so that one does work.
Seriously thank you for understanding this topic and your suggestions. About the don-lee it came up in my original search on yahoo. And that's when I decided to post this subject. Again thanks.


ETA: I went back to my original search on yahoo and it was "Dona-tee" Here's the Stupid link.
edit on 4 17 2017 by Naturallywired because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:35 PM
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I R S

* drops mike, walks away *



ETA: "tax person" also accepted!
edit on 17-4-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: Because tax man is sexist...



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:35 PM
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The word recipient doesn't do it when talking about donations.
You can be a recipient of things not donated.
Donations are generally considered altruistic acts (except in politics) and the people who receive donations usually benefit from the donation. That's why I believe beneficiary is the word best suited for the answer to the question.

Language and intended meaning versus perceived meaning by use of language fascinates me.
Some of the best manipulators of the English language post right here, on this website.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
I R S

* drops mike, walks away *

OK i'll admit that was funny.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:41 PM
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originally posted by: c2oden
The word recipient doesn't do it when talking about donations.
You can be a recipient of things not donated.
Donations are generally considered altruistic acts (except in politics) and the people who receive donations usually benefit from the donation. That's why I believe beneficiary is the word best suited for the answer to the question.

Language and intended meaning versus perceived meaning by use of language fascinates me.
Some of the best manipulators of the English language post right here, on this website.
Again thanks for the intelligent reply. I might just put all these words on the letter. I just want to address them and acknowledge them with my with my best regards with the proper wording.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 08:47 PM
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Thanks to Noncents, c2oden and others. I got my answer.

Mods can close unless if other want to still discuss.

I got my answer, Thanks ATS



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 09:00 PM
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a reply to: Naturallywired

It is donee. Pronounced dough-knee.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 09:21 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents
a reply to: EternalShadow
Several of those words have specific legal meanings that do not work in relation to giving someone a donation.

An assignee is "A person to whom a right or liability is legally transferred" so that doesn't work in regards to donations.

A devisee is someone that receives something because they were left it in a will.

A legatee is someone that receives a legacy, also specifically in regards to wills and not donations.

An awardee is in regards to receiving an award. Unless the donation is an award this doesn't really work either.

A conferee is in regards to anything so that one does work.



I simply used a thesaurus. Lol.

Donee works for me.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: c2oden
The word recipient doesn't do it when talking about donations.
You can be a recipient of things not donated.
Donations are generally considered altruistic acts (except in politics) and the people who receive donations usually benefit from the donation. That's why I believe beneficiary is the word best suited for the answer to the question.

Language and intended meaning versus perceived meaning by use of language fascinates me.
Some of the best manipulators of the English language post right here, on this website.


Black's Law editions are very interesting....mind blowing at times.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: EternalShadow

Pfft I was thinking you were an English teacher.
edit on 4/17/2017 by Kali74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: Naturallywired

Needy Recipients or Organization in need of (research, outreach, etc.) funds.



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: Naturallywired


There are several type's of people that recieve donation's, charity workers and charity collector's, beggers and of course my most disliked BIG charity managing directors and chief executive's, while I care about the Beggers, the cause of the charity's themselves these day's too many charity's in the UK and perhaps the US as well are created as false front's in order to allow tax write off schemes for big corporation's, on other word's many charity's including some big name one's could be argued to be largely bogus.

Now why do I dislike these Charity chief executives and managing director's, there pay packet you see they tend NOT to do there job's for nothing and are indeed often paid just as much as Corporate head's are paid, yes you need administration but there are many people whom would do it for far less but like anything these Employees of the charity then hold the purst string's, set here own and there sub workers pay rates and rake in the donation's of the General public (and the tax write off donation's of the Big Corporation's along with the Fixers rate's which end up in there own and of course the concerned corporate rep's and lawyers pocket's - tax free of course).

When the money get's to the source of the need for which the charity SUPPOSEDLY stand's, not very much of it in the case of some big charity's like Oxfam then and only then it is getting to were the general public donors are wanting it to get too, the Corporate donors on the other hand are more concerned with how much tax they get to write off and how much it improves there own balance sheet's than the actual supposed real recipient's of there corporate donation's.

Kind of make's you feel a little bit annoyed and just a touch jaded does it not.

Now it was worse as back in the 90's there was a scandal when the public heard how little of there donation's got to there intended recipiant's so the like's of Oxfam had to clean up there act and now about 84 percent of donation's to that charity actually get to the deserving cause but once again how much of that money is lost other than Oxfam's own administration cost's would require analysis of each of those daughter causes in turn but I suspect that it is perhaps 50 to 60 percent at the end of the road that DOES get to were you intended it to get.

SO Oxfam actually mended there act and did so rather better than some other charities around the world.

edit on 17-4-2017 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 11:00 PM
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originally posted by: LABTECH767
a reply to: Naturallywired


There are several type's of people that recieve donation's, charity workers and charity collector's, beggers and of course my most disliked BIG charity managing directors and chief executive's, while I care about the Beggers, the cause of the charity's themselves these day's too many charity's in the UK and perhaps the US as well are created as false front's in order to allow tax write off schemes for big corporation's, on other word's many charity's including some big name one's could be argued to be largely bogus.

Now why do I dislike these Charity chief executives and managing director's, there pay packet you see they tend NOT to do there job's for nothing and are indeed often paid just as much as Corporate head's are paid, yes you need administration but there are many people whom would do it for far less but like anything these Employees of the charity then hold the purst string's, set here own and there sub workers pay rates and rake in the donation's of the General public (and the tax write off donation's of the Big Corporation's along with the Fixers rate's which end up in there own and of course the concerned corporate rep's and lawyers pocket's - tax free of course).

When the money get's to the source of the need for which the charity SUPPOSEDLY stand's, not very much of it in the case of some big charity's like Oxfam then and only then it is getting to were the general public donors are wanting it to get too, the Corporate donors on the other hand are more concerned with how much tax they get to write off and how much it improves there own balance sheet's than the actual supposed real recipient's of there corporate donation's.

Kind of make's you feel a little bit annoyed and just a touch jaded does it not.

Now it was worse as back in the 90's there was a scandal when the public heard how little of there donation's got to there intended recipiant's so the like's of Oxfam had to clean up there act and now about 84 percent of donation's to that charity actually get to the deserving cause but once again how much of that money is lost other than Oxfam's own administration cost's would require analysis of each of those daughter causes in turn but I suspect that it is perhaps 50 to 60 percent at the end of the road that DOES get to were you intended it to get.

SO Oxfam actually mended there act and did so rather better than some other charities around the world.
So, Donee?



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 11:15 PM
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Dunno if this will help much but.. I have been very fortunate and awarded a few scholarships, each time when they announced them, scholarship awardees were called 'recipients'.
When sending my Thank You letters, I referred to myself as the 'donee'.
Your generosity will be greatly appreciated by someone out there!

edit on 17-4-2017 by Starcrossd because: added info




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