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10 year old autistic boy gets arrested at school

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posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 12:48 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: ketsuko

He attacked a staff 6 months ago and the man pressed charges. Pretty petty imo.


I know a child who was violent to teachers at age 5 actually scared a teacher enough for her to call the police. His parent did nothing but stand by the kid instead of actually telling him what he did was wrong, he killed people at age 20 by blowing them up.

The mother's response to his violence seem condoning to me, autistic is a term that covers many variables we can't consider all who are called autistic the same but regardless of their condition teaching right from wrong should and can be done.




posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: AboveBoard




At least with time-outs he was actually feeling punished because he had to stop what he wanted to do and go to his room. Anyway. Just a parenting story for those who think "soft parenting" is the problem...

Your son has severe autism so is not the same as the Op but I am
curious how you forced or enforced the time outs? Many would simply refuse what do you do then?



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: knowledgehunter0986
Its interesting. I read the headline and thought out loud "oh I guess Florida is not the only state that does not hesitate to arrest children". Then I continue reading. That just brought me back some flashback. Walk of shame through the mall at ten in cuffs, I know how he feels.


Please take a few moments to look up child crime. There are children age 5 who murder and today it is worse then ever before if maybe something was done to prevent their crimes instead of feeling that their age prevented it maybe it would not have happened.
Example page of crimes by kids



Christopher Pittman was a young 12-year-old boy who was convicted of murdering his grandparents while they slept. The matter of the case was what made it very disturbing. Christopher was a troubled child who had issues with anger and depression.


www.therichest.com...



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie




i have no doubt that the kid has more problems than the school or his mother are capable of dealing with. but to arrest and keep him overnight away from his mother, the one thing that more then likely keeps him clam is kinda over the top.

I saw a case where this was done to show the child their future it they persist because their parent only protected the child from the consequences of the behaviors some parents might even enjoy the attention they get in this situation. The separation says "you can be taken away from the parent" if you don't stop the behavior we will.



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 01:20 PM
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citizen obeys rules
age and mental problems no matter
citizen obeys rules
obeys rules
obeys
obey



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: AboveBoard




At least with time-outs he was actually feeling punished because he had to stop what he wanted to do and go to his room. Anyway. Just a parenting story for those who think "soft parenting" is the problem...

Your son has severe autism so is not the same as the Op but I am
curious how you forced or enforced the time outs? Many would simply refuse what do you do then?


Well, we were lucky. My son is able to process language that he hears very well, so I knew he understood what we were asking him to do. Occasionally, he would refuse and become upset. We would simply wait him out - then he would get the time-out. We could close his door and know that he was in a safe environment, as his room was designed for him to be able to be in it without constant supervision.

The bottom line is if he refused, everything would stop until he complied. The movie would turn off, or whatever he was playing with would disappear, or the food would be removed from the table, or when he was little, we'd simply pick him up and put him there... Afterwards, we would explain again why he had a time-out and what we expected of him. It took a lot of work and constant reminders. It was slow work!

I have to say, on the other side of it, I'm a BIG believer in "catching kids doing things right." It is more of a positive-discipline approach that focusses on praising what is well done and picking one's battles carefully over behaviors to "prune."




posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: ketsuko

He attacked a staff 6 months ago and the man pressed charges. Pretty petty imo.


I know a child who was violent to teachers at age 5 actually scared a teacher enough for her to call the police. His parent did nothing but stand by the kid instead of actually telling him what he did was wrong, he killed people at age 20 by blowing them up.

The mother's response to his violence seem condoning to me, autistic is a term that covers many variables we can't consider all who are called autistic the same but regardless of their condition teaching right from wrong should and can be done.


Hm. Sounds like he had more going on than "autism." I would say "autism" with psychopathic tendencies??
Autism is a spectrum disorder and without knowing his case or what meds he was on or how he was being worked with, it's impossible to say why he turned out the way he did. Sounds quite extreme.




posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: RoScoLaz5
citizen obeys rules
age and mental problems no matter
citizen obeys rules
obeys rules
obeys
obey


Stop! Citizen, OBEY.

Quite creepy. The police state rages on. Society was just on the cusp of uniting on this issue until a "side" was created and turned it into a soley race thing. Screw everyone else.

I don't care for the excuses in this thread. Arresting 10 year olds for "abusing" huge adults and then slapping a FELONY on them is ludicrous. The worst part about this whole thing is the growing number of morons who are OK with it.



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: AboveBoard

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: AboveBoard




At least with time-outs he was actually feeling punished because he had to stop what he wanted to do and go to his room. Anyway. Just a parenting story for those who think "soft parenting" is the problem...

Your son has severe autism so is not the same as the Op but I am
curious how you forced or enforced the time outs? Many would simply refuse what do you do then?


Well, we were lucky. My son is able to process language that he hears very well, so I knew he understood what we were asking him to do. Occasionally, he would refuse and become upset. We would simply wait him out - then he would get the time-out. We could close his door and know that he was in a safe environment, as his room was designed for him to be able to be in it without constant supervision.

The bottom line is if he refused, everything would stop until he complied. The movie would turn off, or whatever he was playing with would disappear, or the food would be removed from the table, or when he was little, we'd simply pick him up and put him there... Afterwards, we would explain again why he had a time-out and what we expected of him. It took a lot of work and constant reminders. It was slow work!

I have to say, on the other side of it, I'm a BIG believer in "catching kids doing things right." It is more of a positive-discipline approach that focusses on praising what is well done and picking one's battles carefully over behaviors to "prune."


To bad you can't be everyone's Parent! I am impressed.
edit on 15-4-2017 by SeaWorthy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 05:29 PM
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originally posted by: AboveBoard

originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
a reply to: ketsuko

He attacked a staff 6 months ago and the man pressed charges. Pretty petty imo.


I know a child who was violent to teachers at age 5 actually scared a teacher enough for her to call the police. His parent did nothing but stand by the kid instead of actually telling him what he did was wrong, he killed people at age 20 by blowing them up.

The mother's response to his violence seem condoning to me, autistic is a term that covers many variables we can't consider all who are called autistic the same but regardless of their condition teaching right from wrong should and can be done.


Hm. Sounds like he had more going on than "autism." I would say "autism" with psychopathic tendencies??
Autism is a spectrum disorder and without knowing his case or what meds he was on or how he was being worked with, it's impossible to say why he turned out the way he did. Sounds quite extreme.


Yesyou are quite right and I think we need to know a lot more about this boy before we judge the matter at all.



posted on Apr, 15 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: knowledgehunter0986

No amount of good parenting can change the behaviour of an autistic child. They CAN'T learn to behave normally. It's a mental disability. They will never adopt the social norms that people with all their mental faculties take for granted.

Not all autistic people are the same either. Some are very kind. Others can easily go into fits of uncontrollable rage. Aspies are notorious for this. They get social anxiety very easily and they respond to it by lashing out. The parent can harp on controlling their anger every day for 30 years, do time outs, do corporal punishment, do therapy with multiple therapists, and it will all result in nothing because they cannot learn social norms. It's not in them to do so.

The parenting wasn't a cause of this. The school staff are at fault for not accommodating him better. IMO the staff member who pressed charges should lose their job.



posted on Apr, 16 2017 @ 05:37 AM
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Why could the police not explain his rights? And why did they not allow the mother to ride in the car? Does he not have to have a responsible adult present?



posted on Apr, 16 2017 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: WilsonWilson
Why could the police not explain his rights? And why did they not allow the mother to ride in the car? Does he not have to have a responsible adult present?


That's what I was wondering, too! They were not violent but the police were very cruel to both the boy and his mother. Very strange!!



posted on Apr, 17 2017 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: knowledgehunter0986stuff
i hope this man gets bslapped by other parents and staff how petty do you got to be to swear out a warrant on a ten year old. maybe school board will get enough letters from parents demanding his termination . whether the kid is autistic or not how you gonna do that to a kid.




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