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United States NRQZ A lesson in Government Controlled Communications

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posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:43 PM
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I just learned of a government facility in Green Bank, West Virginia (it’s not the only one) where there is a 13,000 square mile zone of restricted use of radio frequency transmissions. The National Radio Quiet Zone (NRQZ) in West Virginia is an area in which radio transmissions are heavily restricted by law to facilitate scientific research and military intelligence. The Quiet Zone protects the telescopes of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) facility, as well as the antennas and receivers of the U.S. Navy's Information Operations Command (NIOC) at Sugar Grove. The NIOC is a key station in the ECHELON system operated by the National Security Agency (NSA).

In the Radio Quiet Zone, 2-way radio communications, cell phone, and Wi-Fi use have, for the most part, been eliminated since 1958 to prevent interference to the government’s radio telescope and NSA communications array. The Quiet Zone is strictly enforced within the 20 mile radius of the telescope to the point where citizens have had to discontinue their use of “devices emitting noticeably high amounts of electromagnetic radiation” such as microwave ovens, WiFi routers, cordless phones, wireless equipment, and unintentional radiators such as faulty electrical equipment. Gasoline-powered motor vehicles are forbidden within the zone nearest the telescope as the ignition system on spark-ignited engines generates radio interference, resulting in all vehicles and equipment needing to be diesel-powered.

With nearly 60 years of enforcing the Quiet Zone, I’m sure the government has perfected their means of controlling the local communications systems in that area. With this aspect in mind, I see this zone as a good example of the type of control that could be utilized in a scenario where the government controls all communications. Currently, there have been uses of cell phone blocking techniques and an internet “kill switch” to block sensitive communications in localities where protests and civil unrest have taken place. In the Radio Quiet Zone it seems that cell phones are not being blocked, as such a signal would probably interfere with the telescope, but rather the cell towers have been restricted by law. Apparently the only enforcement is a 50 dollar fine imposed by the F.C.C. for any RF interference created by the public.

Although most omnidirectional and high-power radio frequency transmissions are not allowed, there are some exceptions, therefore, more reason why they wouldn’t employ a frequency blocking transmission in such a situation. Not all radio transmissions are prohibited, such transmissions include emergency services (police, fire, and ambulance) and Citizen's Band radio. The only broadcast radio stations in the area are one station in the AM band, and several low-power FM stations. Broadcast transmitters in the core of the Quiet Zone are forced to operate at reduced power and use highly directional antennas. Exceptions to restrictions are usually determined on a case-by-case basis, with preference given to public safety, such as remote alarm systems, repeaters for emergency services, and NOAA Weather Radio.

So, what forms of communications are left for the citizens of Green Bank? The citizens can still use hardwired communications and satellite signals, such as land line phones, wire and fiber optic cables, satellite services such as satellite T.V., phone, and radios. Low wattage indoor WiFi is allowed when it doesn’t interfere with the telescope. Public safety broadcast communications, a commercial broadcast AM radio station and a few low powered FM radio stations are also allowed. Interestingly enough, use of the Citizens Band radio is allowed without restriction. Perhaps a combination of frequency and low power output is the reason that CBs are OK to use. Amateur Ham radio operators can broadcast from a base station with permission and when below a certain output level, this includes repeaters. Mobile Ham radios are not as restricted.

When we examine the National Radio Quiet Zone information, what can we expect when communications are being controlled by the government during an emergency or crisis? Well, this information seems to support some of my contentions concerning such a scenario. Unless you are in a hot spot that is strictly controlled, where jamming interference and an internet kill switch is used, satellite, hard wired and low powered line of sight communications may still be available.

What about a scenario where the internet, hard wired services, cell phone towers and satellite communications are blacked out entirely? Unless jammed locally, 2-way radios may be the only alternative left. Amateur radios (and their repeaters) will likely be operational at high power for official emergency purposes or perhaps used at a lower power for personal communications. Whatever the restrictions, those frequencies will be highly monitored and if personal use is being reduced to low powered transmissions, the range of Ham radios will not be much better than unlicensed 2-way radios.

CBs and other low power unlicensed 2-ways (FRS and MURS) will probably be best as these radios are cheap and readily available. Also, the low powered unlicensed frequencies are for personal public use, would be harder to receive, and are mostly ignored unless there are complaints to the F.C.C., who would likely be over burdened in a national emergency crisis. Using line of sight, horizontally polarized directional antennas for low power unlicensed transmissions would help by increasing range, making communications clearer and would be less likely to be picked up and monitored. A private WiFi meshnet network, using highly efficient directional antennas, would probably go unnoticed in addition to being encrypted and password protected.




posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:49 PM
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Would this be similar to my cell signal disrupter?
I had thought about what would happen if I hooked it to my hlly transmitter to see what kind of range I'd get.
Then I found out its big time illegal, so haven't played with it.

Do they actually kill signals other than their own? Or is it just illegal to b transmit in the area?



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

50 dollar fine? Id throw that in the garbage then throw a hotpocket in the microwave. Im crazy like that.

Sounds like a quiet town. Might not be a bad place to live once you get accustomed to using the old-school rotary phones again.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: Natas0114
Would this be similar to my cell signal disrupter?
I had thought about what would happen if I hooked it to my hlly transmitter to see what kind of range I'd get.
Then I found out its big time illegal, so haven't played with it.

Do they actually kill signals other than their own? Or is it just illegal to b transmit in the area?


They don't kill the signals that I know of, just enforce the restrictions. They allow exceptions with restrictions to prevent interference. You have to get permission when using a base station Ham radio for instance. The closer to the the government antennas, the greater the restrictions.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: Idreamofme

Apparently it's a Mecca for people who claim to be sensitive to RF emissions. These types are a bunch of looney tunes in the eyes of the life long citizens in the area. I guess they feel they can remove the tin foil hats safely while living there.
edit on 10-4-2017 by MichiganSwampBuck because: typo



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:40 PM
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Kind of makes me wonder what they are REALLY doing there.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

That would terrify the hell outof me to live in an area where everything is pure government transmissions.

It's gotta be weird as hell, like a nuclear test town mockup.



posted on Apr, 10 2017 @ 09:13 PM
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Rickymouse:
There are conspiracies surrounding the NRQZ, those aren't the focus of this thread. Although I wouldn't mind if anyone looked into that and posted it here.

Natas0114:
Your comment reminded me of the village where "The Prisoner" lived as a spy. That was a really strange TV program produced by the BBC that I would watch as a kid. Never understood it, but found it entertaining enough to watch back then. Probably no cartoons on TV during the time slot when I watched it.



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